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Urgent - offloaded from QR due to illness

Urgent - offloaded from QR due to illness

Old Dec 31, 19, 3:40 pm
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Urgent - offloaded from QR due to illness

Currently on an AA award MEL-ASP-ADL-DOH-DUB with my 7 year old daughter. Boarded the ADL-DOH in Qsuites, changed into the pyjamas and my daughter developed at toothache and began to cry. The crew noticed and were very nice. They called their doctor and given the 14 hour flight decided she was unfit to fly. We can't get QR to rebook us, they keep saying to call AA becuase it's their ticket. As the trip has started and AA won't have award availability I think QR should rebook for tonights flight - is this right? I'm currently on hold with them they keep saying they can't, waiting on a second supervisor now.

Any ideas what to do - we need to get home.
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Old Dec 31, 19, 4:37 pm
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It is not QR's responsibility to rebook you

I would contact travel insurance company - with the medical issue, it may well cover the additional costs
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Old Dec 31, 19, 4:54 pm
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It wouldn't surprise me if QR requires a "fit to travel" letter from a doctor or dentist. Has the daughter's toothache been treated?
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Old Dec 31, 19, 8:35 pm
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Why is a toothache render someone, even a child, unfit to fly?
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Old Dec 31, 19, 8:39 pm
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Originally Posted by beachfan View Post
Why is a toothache render someone, even a child, unfit to fly?
Would you like to be seated near a screaming child for a fourteen hour flight?

Seriously, I suspect that pressure/altitude changes can exacerbate dental problems but IANAD = I am not a doctor and IANAD' = I am not an dentist.
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Old Dec 31, 19, 8:45 pm
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A timely reminder of 2 points
1) never admit to any minor malady to or within earshot of flight crew
2) pack age appropriate doses of simple analgesia and give ASAP for said minor malady

remember the lady a couple of years ago offloaded for telling the cabin crew she had period pain? Airlines just wonít take the risk of a diversion if they can possibly avoid it
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Last edited by nancypants; Dec 31, 19 at 8:57 pm
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Old Dec 31, 19, 8:45 pm
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Originally Posted by MSPeconomist View Post
Would you like to be seated near a screaming child for a fourteen hour flight?

Seriously, I suspect that pressure/altitude changes can exacerbate dental problems but IANAD = I am not a doctor and IANAD' = I am not an dentist.
thatís a different issue. Have seen many a screaming baby , never were they offloaded.

re OPs urgent issue, I would think itís QE responsibility for issues at the airport. Would be if the plane had mechanical problems.



good luck!
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Old Dec 31, 19, 8:46 pm
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Depending on what the issue is, pressure changes are something that can exacerbate tooth pain issues

Originally Posted by nancypants View Post
A timely reminder of 2 points
1) never admit to any minor malady to or within earshot of flight crew
because lying is always a better approach; great parenting approach to hide cause of pain impacting on a young child
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Old Dec 31, 19, 8:51 pm
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Originally Posted by Dave Noble View Post
because lying is always a better approach; great parenting approach to hide cause of pain impacting on a young child
I would never advocate for lying. But people get on planes in minor amounts of pain every day of the week. Once it has been brought to the airlines attention either inadvertently or advertently it unfortunately becomes something they have to react to

IAAMP and canít think of a single good medical reason to offload a child with a simple toothache. I also canít think of a single good medical explanation other than a dental cause that would result in toothache in a small child

analgesia by definition hides pain- you think leaving the child in pain is a better parenting approach? Here that is called ďneglect of medical careĒ and would be reportable to the child protection authorities

Last edited by nancypants; Dec 31, 19 at 8:56 pm
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Old Dec 31, 19, 8:53 pm
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Sorry , but pain is not a medical reason to be unfit for flying, unless there is something else serious.

Headaches can also be made worse from flying. It doesnít usually require any type of medical attention beyond Advil.
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Old Dec 31, 19, 9:02 pm
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Originally Posted by beachfan View Post
Sorry , but pain is not a medical reason to be unfit for flying, unless there is something else serious.

Headaches can also be made worse from flying. It doesn’t usually require any type of medical attention beyond Advil.
It’s one thing for an adult to make that decision for themselves. I think making the decision to allow your 7 year old child suffer in pain for a 14 hour flight crosses that line. Especially when the cause of the toothache is unknown. How do you know it isn’t ‘something else serious’? The child certainly wouldn’t be able to tell you.
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Old Dec 31, 19, 9:04 pm
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Originally Posted by Finkface View Post
Itís one thing for an adult to make that decision for themselves. I think making the decision to allow your 7 year old child suffer in pain for a 14 hour flight crosses that line. Especially when the cause of the toothache is unknown. How do you know iti snít Ďsomething else seriousí? The child certainly wouldnít be able to tell you.
this is where point 2 (above) really comes into its own 😉
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Old Dec 31, 19, 9:07 pm
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Originally Posted by nancypants View Post
this is where point 2 (above) really comes into its own 😉
You are still choosing to put your 7 year old child through a 14 hour flight in pain. As I said, IMO a parent should make a better choice than that.
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Old Dec 31, 19, 9:10 pm
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Originally Posted by Finkface View Post
You are still choosing to put your 7 year old child through a 14 hour flight in pain. As I said, IMO a parent should make a better choice than that.
nah, hard disagree. The kids analgesia guidelines in Australia no longer include codeine, so pain that doesnít respond to simple analgesia gets morphine, oxycodone or something like nitrous oxide (bearing in mind this flight departed from Adelaide so itís not like anyone locally is going to give much more, maybe antibiotics but they donít have an analgesic effect and realistically are going to take 24-48 hours to give any effect anyway)

in 20 years of practice I have never had a child with a toothache require anything more than paracetamol or ibuprofen

are we seriously saying this child required harder drugs than that?
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Old Dec 31, 19, 9:11 pm
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Originally Posted by Finkface View Post
Itís one thing for an adult to make that decision for themselves. I think making the decision to allow your 7 year old child suffer in pain for a 14 hour flight crosses that line. Especially when the cause of the toothache is unknown. How do you know it isnít Ďsomething else seriousí? The child certainly wouldnít be able to tell you.
And it isnít going to hurt on the ground? They should take the child to the ER in a foreign country?And you know an analgesic wonít help?

i think thatís the parents decision, not yours or the airline.

For it to be a serious tooth problem (infected abscess), isnít it unlikely to just start hurting? Serious toothaches start out as minor ones
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