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Time to Ban This Passenger! (Pax offered disembarkation at gate, demands on apron)

Time to Ban This Passenger! (Pax offered disembarkation at gate, demands on apron)

Old Jul 23, 19, 10:55 pm
  #16  
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Originally Posted by Austin787 View Post
So one passenger can ask to get off the plane while taxiing to the runway, and the crew complies with that passenger? Doesn't seem fair to the other passengers who will be further delayed, not to mention future flights scheduled on that plane would also be delayed. Unless the crew deems the demanding passenger a potential disruption or threat to the flight, then I can understand why they would turn the plane back to off load the passenger.
I agree, missing a meeting is not ample excuse to get off a flight while it is heading to the runway
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Old Jul 23, 19, 10:58 pm
  #17  
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Originally Posted by spin88 View Post
While I agree its sort of a dick move on the guys part, I also understand the "my flight has become in vane" part. A self centered person (or one wanting to save themselves the cost of the trip) would want off.

The problem with your suggestion is that he has a legal right to get off the plane. If AA were to punish him for excising that right, I doubt that DOT would be pleased... There are regulations, and if you exercise your rights under them, and get punished by AA, well AA is going to be in a world of legal trouble. Just reality.
Also, if AA were to punish this guy, should they also punish someone who, for instance, has a heart attack in flight and "causes" a medical diversion? That's likely to inconvenience more people, cause more missed connections, and be much more expensive for the airline than a return to gate situation.
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Old Jul 23, 19, 11:14 pm
  #18  
 
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Originally Posted by Austin787 View Post
So one passenger can ask to get off the plane while taxiing to the runway, and the crew complies with that passenger? Doesn't seem fair to the other passengers who will be further delayed, not to mention future flights scheduled on that plane would also be delayed. Unless the crew deems the demanding passenger a potential disruption or threat to the flight, then I can understand why they would turn the plane back to off load the passenger.
The correct response IMO would have been: As you're seating in row 4 you will be one of the first people off the plane...when we land in JFK. There's a cost to AA to go back to the gate plus it could end up causing further delays that not only affect everyone else but could result in crew timeouts which could have made things even worse...the guy should have been told to sit down and shut it or given a bill for the cost of returning at that point given he passed on multiple options to deplane at the gate.
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Old Jul 23, 19, 11:23 pm
  #19  
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Originally Posted by MSPeconomist View Post
Also, if AA were to punish this guy, should they also punish someone who, for instance, has a heart attack in flight and "causes" a medical diversion? That's likely to inconvenience more people, cause more missed connections, and be much more expensive for the airline than a return to gate situation.
I certainly couldn't fathom connecting those dots. The person reported by the OP is clearly a douche bag, to the extent that I would have no problem firing him as a customer. Disembarking at the gate was clearly a win-win, but he (passive aggressively) dragged the process on in a manner that affected others.
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Old Jul 23, 19, 11:41 pm
  #20  
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response from AA

received a response from AA’s social media team. implied no absolute right for a passenger to demand to exit the flight after leaving the gate, said it was at the discretion of the crew. the flight crew said several times during this process that “they were frustrated Too” including a couple of times while 4A was still on the aircraft. as someone else mentioned-perhaps they did not want a meltdown at 32,000 feet!
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Old Jul 24, 19, 2:59 am
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After the shenanigans, did they upgrade next on the list to 4A?
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Old Jul 24, 19, 6:11 am
  #22  
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@mastertrust - I hope that you personally will never have any need to request off-loading, and I wish you never be forced to fly in vane. Continue this attitude with those who liked your rant - just remember -- THEN THEY WILL COME FOR YOU.
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Old Jul 24, 19, 6:46 am
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I think, very simply, AA made a mistake here. Once that door closes, you should lose your last chance to deplane (barring a medical emergency). It isn't fair to delay all the other 100+ passengers (and possibly hundreds more for later flights that this plane needs to fly) because an individual decides the trip isn't worth it any more for himself/herself.
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Old Jul 24, 19, 8:09 am
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Originally Posted by 355F1 View Post
I thought this was going to be the same guy and a continuation of the guy in the admirals club with his feet all over the table!!!!

lolololololol!
No thats my twin brother. Ever since we got the co-branded credit card, we feel that we own the airline.
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Old Jul 24, 19, 8:39 am
  #25  
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Once the flight is closed (not just the cabin door), it is a matter of the Captain's discretion. Safety always comes first and I'm more than prepared to defer to an experienced Captain who presumably consults with the cabin crew to do their best to figure out the consequences of saying "no."

That is a separate issue from the question of what AA ought to do as a corporate matter. So long as AA is not discriminating based on a protected class such as race or religion, it all comes down to a business decision. Sometimes carriers are too focused on the individual passenger and not on the others who are inconvenienced.
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Old Jul 24, 19, 9:24 am
  #26  
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Originally Posted by m44 View Post
@mastertrust - I hope that you personally will never have any need to request off-loading, and I wish you never be forced to fly in vane. Continue this attitude with those who liked your rant - just remember -- THEN THEY WILL COME FOR YOU.
Offloading at the gate is one thing. Offloading when the plane is 4th or 5th in line to take off, due to a missed business meeting, is entirely different and could cause people to miss their business meetings, or other events
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Old Jul 24, 19, 9:26 am
  #27  
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Originally Posted by MSPeconomist View Post
Also, if AA were to punish this guy, should they also punish someone who, for instance, has a heart attack in flight and "causes" a medical diversion? That's likely to inconvenience more people, cause more missed connections, and be much more expensive for the airline than a return to gate situation.
I do not equate a medical emergency with someone who has missed their business meeting, and could have left the plane while it was at the gate. What about the other people on the plane who have somewhere to get to and have time constraints?
Should they miss their events just caused this a**wipe missed his?
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Old Jul 24, 19, 9:32 am
  #28  
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Originally Posted by GNRMatt View Post
I think, very simply, AA made a mistake here. Once that door closes, you should lose your last chance to deplane (barring a medical emergency).
if you replace "once that door closes" with "once the plane is actually taxiing to the runway", I agree, but I fervently disagree with the idea of holding passengers hostage for an extended period of time.
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Old Jul 24, 19, 12:28 pm
  #29  
 
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Can AA actually ban a passenger? I had this vague feeling that as a common carrier, they were obligated to offer transportation to anyone willing to pay the published fare. And another vague feeling that it was not possible to overrule that obligation by writing things into a CoC that the general public has not agreed to.

But maybe my vague understanding is flawed? Maybe as a practical matter they ban passengers all the time? Can they share a blacklist of undesirable customers with their "competition"? Or publish it?

Honestly, I have no idea how any of this works as a practical matter.

Thanks
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Old Jul 24, 19, 12:40 pm
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Originally Posted by moondog View Post
if you replace "once that door closes" with "once the plane is actually taxiing to the runway", I agree, but I fervently disagree with the idea of holding passengers hostage for an extended period of time.
Totally agree. But not in this case.
I quote the OP
... several times he is offered the chance to deplane while we sit at the gate for more than an hour.
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