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AA 80 DFW-LHR divert YOW, passenger dies 29 May 2019

AA 80 DFW-LHR divert YOW, passenger dies 29 May 2019

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Old May 30, 19, 4:20 pm
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AA 80 DFW-LHR divert YOW, passenger dies 29 May 2019

https://flightaware.com/live/flight/...230Z/KDFW/CYOW

https://ottawacitizen.com/news/local...ding-in-ottawa

A 52-year-old man is dead after his American Airlines flight made an emergency landing in Ottawa early Thursday.

Paramedics were called at 2:18 a.m. by a report of a man with chest pains aboard the Dallas to London flight.

He went into cardiac arrest before paramedics arrived and the flight crew began CPR.

Once on the plane sitting on the tarmac, paramedics launched advanced life support protocols, which typically include an IV to administer epinephrine and intubation to protect the patient’s airway.

They worked to save him for about 30 minutes but he was pronounced dead.

The plane departed for London at about 4:30 a.m
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Old May 30, 19, 9:30 pm
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Originally Posted by tracon View Post
https://flightaware.com/live/flight/...230Z/KDFW/CYOW

https://ottawacitizen.com/news/local...ding-in-ottawa

A 52-year-old man is dead after his American Airlines flight made an emergency landing in Ottawa early Thursday.

Paramedics were called at 2:18 a.m. by a report of a man with chest pains aboard the Dallas to London flight.

He went into cardiac arrest before paramedics arrived and the flight crew began CPR.

Once on the plane sitting on the tarmac, paramedics launched advanced life support protocols, which typically include an IV to administer epinephrine and intubation to protect the patient’s airway.

They worked to save him for about 30 minutes but he was pronounced dead.

The plane departed for London at about 4:30 a.m
I wonder how much time elapsed from the moment of his arrest to paramedics making contact with him on the ground.

I can't imagine it was that quick, and in the meantime, the flight crew presumably kept doing CPR.

That must have been a pretty dramatic scene for surrounding passengers to witness.
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Old May 31, 19, 7:29 am
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Originally Posted by metallo View Post
I wonder how much time elapsed from the moment of his arrest to paramedics making contact with him on the ground.

I can't imagine it was that quick, and in the meantime, the flight crew presumably kept doing CPR.
When I took my CPR refresher last year, we were read in on a recent case study: 2 EMT's were hiking, came across a man in cardiac arrest, they performed CPR for 72 minutes while another bystander hiked down and called for help. The victim survived w/o complications.

While this is certainly an extreme case, if you have well trained crew who know how to properly administer CPR (hard, fast, switch off to prevent fatigue), keeping the patient alive for the length of an expedited medical emergency descent is not out of the question. Additionally, most FA/CPR kits on planes have AED's now which significantly boost survival odds of a cardiac event.
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Old May 31, 19, 8:51 am
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Originally Posted by metallo View Post
I wonder how much time elapsed from the moment of his arrest to paramedics making contact with him on the ground.

I can't imagine it was that quick, and in the meantime, the flight crew presumably kept doing CPR.

That must have been a pretty dramatic scene for surrounding passengers to witness.
According to some articles, physicians onboard tended to him as well. CPR and an AED were used.
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Old May 31, 19, 8:58 am
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Originally Posted by jtav559 View Post
When I took my CPR refresher last year, we were read in on a recent case study: 2 EMT's were hiking, came across a man in cardiac arrest, they performed CPR for 72 minutes while another bystander hiked down and called for help. The victim survived w/o complications.

While this is certainly an extreme case, if you have well trained crew who know how to properly administer CPR (hard, fast, switch off to prevent fatigue), keeping the patient alive for the length of an expedited medical emergency descent is not out of the question. Additionally, most FA/CPR kits on planes have AED's now which significantly boost survival odds of a cardiac event.
As a physician I can tell you that is far from the usual.

First the out of hospital 90 day survival for cardiac arrest is something like 5%. Meaning if you have a cardiac arrest at the mall, even if you have "successful" CPR, the likelihood that you are still alive 90 days after the event is 5%.

Second, with extended CPR like described above, the likelihood of significant anoxic brain injury is very high. So that even if the person is in the 5%, they may not want to be because they may not ever go home and be functional again.

Inhospital CPR stats are much better but out in the "wild" not so much.
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Old May 31, 19, 10:52 am
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Originally Posted by mnhusker View Post
Inhospital CPR stats are much better but out in the "wild" not so much.
They're not that much better, maybe 20% at most.

Originally Posted by mnhusker View Post
Second, with extended CPR like described above, the likelihood of significant anoxic brain injury is very high. So that even if the person is in the 5%, they may not want to be because they may not ever go home and be functional again.
This. But I suppose they still really have no choice but to give it a shot anyway. Wouldn't have the right optics PR-wise if they just continued on without trying to land and obtain more assistance.
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Old May 31, 19, 11:01 am
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Originally Posted by mnhusker View Post
As a physician I can tell you that is far from the usual.
I thought the story sounded a little "pie in the sky" myself, but it certainly inspired some modicum of confidence in executing CPR when called upon in order to save a life. Agreed that you are in for a rough go at life after such a traumatic health event; easy street without complications is not the normal recovery path for someone on the mend from a cardiac event.

Of course, as per the topic of this thread, even medical professionals, well executed CPR, with the addition of an AED does not always keep someone from passing. Shouldn't keep you from trying, tho!
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Old May 31, 19, 1:29 pm
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Originally Posted by jtav559 View Post
I thought the story sounded a little "pie in the sky" myself, but it certainly inspired some modicum of confidence in executing CPR when called upon in order to save a life. Agreed that you are in for a rough go at life after such a traumatic health event; easy street without complications is not the normal recovery path for someone on the mend from a cardiac event.

Of course, as per the topic of this thread, even medical professionals, well executed CPR, with the addition of an AED does not always keep someone from passing. Shouldn't keep you from trying, tho!
Didnt mean to imply that you should not try, just that many people don't realize just how poor the outcomes of CPR really are.

It's not like on TV, especially the neurologic outcomes. The old brain does not like being without normal blood flow for any but the briefest periods of time.
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Old Jun 1, 19, 7:54 am
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My worst CPR was an hour on the beach in St. John. Was pretty hopeless, but the single EMS unit on the island was responding to a car crash at the other end of the island, and had to fight traffic. I know 2 people who were in asystole and survived with a good outcome. For both, a bystander immediately started CPR. One was on the thumper for an hour at his home before they could transport. They cooled his head for 3 days, and his worst residual was short term memory. He is back at work. The other was riding his bike to work in Philadelphia and fell over on the side walk. CPR, transport, also cooled his head, and he is back at work. Both had arrhythmias, not occlusive events.

Last edited by boerne; Jun 1, 19 at 7:55 am Reason: added data
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