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How to do an international booking with an open jaw & open return?

How to do an international booking with an open jaw & open return?

Old Dec 12, 18, 8:31 am
  #1  
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How to do an international booking with an open jaw & open return?

Hi, will be traveling later next year from probably SFO, DFW or LAX to SYD. I'd like to leave the return open jaw, with the date not fixed.
How do I do this? How far out from the original booking and outbound flight dates do I have to re-book the inbound?
Probably doesn't matter, but OW emerald (QFF)
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Old Dec 12, 18, 8:44 am
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Open jaw usually refers to returning from or to a different city than on the outbound flight, you seem to be looking for an open return. As far as I know you must either buy an expensive fully changeable fare or book a return well in the future and then pay the change fee and any fare increase to change to the date you require. Tickets are valid for one year from the date of issue. However, many of the low cost carriers sell one way fares if you can find one to take you all or most of the way.
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Old Dec 12, 18, 8:47 am
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Originally Posted by s115 View Post
Hi, will be traveling later next year from probably SFO, DFW or LAX to SYD. I'd like to leave the return open jaw, with the date not fixed.
How do I do this? How far out from the original booking and outbound flight dates do I have to re-book the inbound?
Probably doesn't matter, but OW emerald (QFF)
No way to do what you are saying, book a round trip but only tell the airline when and where you want to go on one leg, you will have to tell them both legs at the same time. You will have to look at the fare rules for your trip, usually 6 months is the max. You can always just pick something random and far out in dates, then pay to change the second leg later, but there will be change fees and fare differences at that time.
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Old Dec 12, 18, 10:29 am
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Originally Posted by HiAperture View Post
No way to do what you are saying, book a round trip but only tell the airline when and where you want to go on one leg, you will have to tell them both legs at the same time. You will have to look at the fare rules for your trip, usually 6 months is the max. You can always just pick something random and far out in dates, then pay to change the second leg later, but there will be change fees and fare differences at that time.
Or hope for a change that will let you avoid a fare increase and change fees
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Old Dec 12, 18, 10:37 am
  #5  
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You’re looking for an open return, not an open jaw (though you may want that too), and only if you purchase the most expensive and flexible fare (because you can change the return any time without incurring change fees and fare increases) can you practically accomplish this.

As for open jaw, the use of aa.com allows that by selecting Advanced search and using the Multi-city option. The open part of the jaw must generally be of less distance than the two ticketed sectors, among other rules. The fare is generally calculated on 1/2 of the round trip using the first flown sector plus 1/2 round trip using the second flown sector.

Examples of open jaw (and reverse open jaw) include SFO-SYD + MEL-LAX-SFO, or SFO-SYD-LAX.

This is another time one should take the time to select and read the Detailed Fare Rules thoroughly, as the composite fare will likely involve two (or more) fare types - and generally, the most restrictive rules apply to the entire ticket.
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Old Dec 12, 18, 11:29 am
  #6  
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Ah thanks, confused the open return and open jaw.
So usually valid from 12 months from date of ISSUE. Any way to extend that out, or change the inbound to further out that 12 months?
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Old Dec 12, 18, 11:35 am
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If you have enough miles, I'd recommend making a reward booking. The date and routing can be changed for free at any time. So pick a date that is available and might work, but then keep searching or set an EF alert for availability on other dates.
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Old Dec 12, 18, 12:03 pm
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Originally Posted by s115 View Post
Ah thanks, confused the open return and open jaw.
So usually valid from 12 months from date of ISSUE. Any way to extend that out, or change the inbound to further out that 12 months?
Sounds like you will have more than 12 months to make a return flight. Are you 100% certain that over 12+ months period that there is no chance that you will return to origin (home) for extended weekend or something like that?

If such is the case then maybe it is best to buy two separate tickets. It is against the ticket rule, but for international it is possible to find cheapest round trip fare which is less than full fare one way. Purchase cheap round trip fare to reach your destination, throw away return portion. When you are ready to return home after 12+ months, buy another cheap round trip ticket to get home, throwaway second half of the ticket.

Above will be likely cheaper than true open return ticket which usually has to book into most expensive full fare. And as other has mentioned that even most expensive full fare is valid for only 12 months. Also, if you are going to buy most expensive full fare then there will be no difference buying one round trip or two one way. There is no point buying round trip open return. Just buy one way ticket to get to the destination. Buy another one way ticket when you plan to go home.
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Old Dec 12, 18, 12:11 pm
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Another issue that occurs to me is that unless you have citizenship, residence, work permit, immigrant or similar status, Australia only allows, for instance, a visitor from the USA to visit for 90 days as a tourist. If that visitor doesn’t have return transportation booked within the allowed stay, the Australian immigration officers may deny entry put you on the be t flight to your origin. In fact, airline employees in the USA will apply IATA quoted rules and prohibit your boarding the outbound flight.

Use this IAMAT TIMATIC tool here to determine your admission status to Australia. It is what airline employees use to determine if you’ll be allowed to fly internationally, and it beats us guessing here on FlyerTalk.

Australian immigration is very by the book, and no airline wants to risk bringing you back on their dime and paying a large fine if you’re denied entry.
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Old Dec 12, 18, 12:17 pm
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Originally Posted by JDiver View Post
Another issue that o cuts to me is that unless you have citizenship or residence status, Australia only allows Americans, for instance, a visitor from the USA to visit for 90 days as a tourist. If that visitor doesn’t have return transportation booked within the allowed stay, the Australian immigration officers may deny entry put you on the be t flight to your origin. In fact, airline employees in the USA will apply IATA quoted rules and prohibit your boarding the outbound flight.

Use this IAMAT TIMATIC tool here to determine your admission status to Australia. It is what airline employees use to determine if you’ll be allowed to fly internationally, and it beats us guessing here on FlyerTalk.
On second post OP indicated possibly of 12+ months to make a return. Then I assumed OP will be visiting Australia using extended stay visa such as work visa or student visa which does not require return ticket to enter the country. OP could also has a citizenship or residency status at Australia.
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Old Dec 12, 18, 1:32 pm
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Originally Posted by BPCGuy View Post
If you have enough miles, I'd recommend making a reward booking. The date and routing can be changed for free at any time. So pick a date that is available and might work, but then keep searching or set an EF alert for availability on other dates.
This might be a case where it would pay to buy the miles in order to get the flexibility even though thr trips would require award space to be available. The five day hold allows for booking first and buying afterwards.
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Old Dec 12, 18, 2:05 pm
  #12  
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Originally Posted by AlwaysAisle View Post
On second post OP indicated possibly of 12+ months to make a return. Then I assumed OP will be visiting Australia using extended stay visa such as work visa or student visa which does not require return ticket to enter the country. OP could also has a citizenship or residency status at Australia.
The operative word is “could”, as such status has not been disclosed here. If not, and I mentioned those options, the OP should use the IATA TIMATIC link, as there could be unforeseen and serious consequences. I’ve seen enough of those stories here, and know of others not mentioned here, I’m not taking anything for granted.
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Old Dec 12, 18, 8:15 pm
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Originally Posted by HiAperture View Post
No way to do what you are saying, book a round trip but only tell the airline when and where you want to go on one leg, you will have to tell them both legs at the same time. You will have to look at the fare rules for your trip, usually 6 months is the max. You can always just pick something random and far out in dates, then pay to change the second leg later, but there will be change fees and fare differences at that time.
Often with incredible after departure fees and pricing differentials enough to choke a horse. Or render the change moot due to the ridiculous price.
Might be cheaper to buy a new less expensive round trip back and drop the return vs. pay to change after departure. Or the original R/T in case the date is OK and a one way with no change fees.
I think any choice meant to disrupt the original R/T price is doomed to fail.
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Old Dec 12, 18, 11:17 pm
  #14  
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I am an Australian citizen, so no issue there.
I need to fly weat coast usa to syd end oct 2019. But then would probably be coming back for canadian summer july 2019. So my options look to be wait until end july to book return, in a higher fare class or points, or ditch a return ticket. Not considering award bookings as im trying to gain lifetime status, but stance my change.
thanks for the replies
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Old Dec 13, 18, 1:51 am
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Originally Posted by AlwaysAisle View Post
Sounds like you will have more than 12 months to make a return flight. Are you 100% certain that over 12+ months period that there is no chance that you will return to origin (home) for extended weekend or something like that?

If such is the case then maybe it is best to buy two separate tickets. It is against the ticket rule, but for international it is possible to find cheapest round trip fare which is less than full fare one way. Purchase cheap round trip fare to reach your destination, throw away return portion. When you are ready to return home after 12+ months, buy another cheap round trip ticket to get home, throwaway second half of the ticket.

Above will be likely cheaper than true open return ticket which usually has to book into most expensive full fare. And as other has mentioned that even most expensive full fare is valid for only 12 months. Also, if you are going to buy most expensive full fare then there will be no difference buying one round trip or two one way. There is no point buying round trip open return. Just buy one way ticket to get to the destination. Buy another one way ticket when you plan to go home.
This is good advice provided you don't find a good one way LCC fare to your destination.
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