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-   -   Boeing 737 MAX 8 crashes and effects on AA 737 MAX 8s (NOT reaccommodation) (https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/american-airlines-aadvantage/1939333-boeing-737-max-8-crashes-effects-aa-737-max-8s-not-reaccommodation.html)

NauticalWheeler Nov 7, 18 8:38 pm


Originally Posted by Djokison (Post 30405518)


Thatís your (erroneous) interpretation, then.

This is a heads up, no more, no less. At this point in time there is no reason to believe a MAX flight is any likelier to drop from the sky than any other plane.

What other aircraft have this bulletin? Asking because I was not aware of these "bulletins" in general.

Can't the pilots disengage auto pilot when it is causing issues?

Science Goy Nov 7, 18 10:23 pm


Originally Posted by NauticalWheeler (Post 30406205)
What other aircraft have this bulletin? Asking because I was not aware of these "bulletins" in general.

I'd wager that pretty much every aircraft type in existence has active service bulletins.

tryathlete Nov 7, 18 10:38 pm

Iíd like to ďask the pilotĒ what the procedure is for a defective Angle of Attack measuring system. I was flying at U of I institute of Aviation when one of my campus professors was designing his own A of A instrument with a little bit of help from me back then. Best way to operate an aircraft in my opinion is using A of A v airspeed, but thatís not the subject here I suppose.

cova Nov 7, 18 10:59 pm

The plane is supposed to fly automatically. If there is a bug in the system, that caused this - that requires manual intervention, then the plane is unsafe and should be grounded.

737s were grounded in the past, remember the crash in Pittsburg, due to rudder.

arlflyer Nov 8, 18 7:03 am


Originally Posted by Djokison (Post 30405518)
That’s your (erroneous) interpretation, then.

I'm just a simple aerospace engineer, so I'll defer to your expertise then. Clearly nothing to see here.

DataPlumber Nov 8, 18 7:46 am


Originally Posted by cova (Post 30406481)

737s were grounded in the past, remember the crash in Pittsburg, due to rudder.

Huh? The 737 was never grounded. An AD was issued to replace the rudder pcuís. Operators were given 3 years to accomplish this, and pilots were trained on the recovery procedure on the interim.

There are airworthiness directives issued all the time. They range from what the layman would consider mundane to serious. Iíd leave the heavy lifting on these matters to the professionals that maintain and fly the planes.

jk88usa Nov 8, 18 8:32 am

For those of you looking for a more technical explanation of this... I would highly recommend looking at the extensive forum on flight 610 over on a.net.

There is nothing that would concern me about getting on a MAX. This system is also in place on the old NG -8/900 models as well, but admittedly itís ďstrongerĒ on the new MAXs (in Lehmanís terms). Boeing just issued a statement that basically says ďfollow the procedureĒ in the event of AOA instrument problems.

Runaway trim is a perfectly normal training scenario most pilots have practiced dozens of times. Until I see the NTSB or the FAA directly blame the MAX, I donít see how that should change whether you get on one. This bulletin says nothing other than a reminder of how the systems work, and what procedure to follow.

GaryZ Nov 8, 18 8:57 am

The FAA issued an Emergency Airworthiness Directive requiring carriers to rewrite their flight manuals (if necessary) concerning recovery procedures...so not exactly a "heads up" warming. So yeah, probably not the safest plane to being flying right now.

thunderlounge Nov 8, 18 9:14 am


Originally Posted by jk88usa (Post 30407557)
There is nothing that would concern me about getting on a MAX.

Not even in Y? :D

jk88usa Nov 8, 18 9:17 am


Originally Posted by GaryZ (Post 30407647)
The FAA issued an Emergency Airworthiness Directive requiring carriers to rewrite their flight manuals (if necessary) concerning recovery procedures...so not exactly a "heads up" warming. So yeah, probably not the safest plane to being flying right now.

that is an extremely dramatic way of saying the FAA now requires you to put the 3 printed pages Boeing Issued at the front of your flight manuals. Those 3 pages are simply a reminder on procedure that is included later in the manual...

jk88usa Nov 8, 18 9:20 am


Originally Posted by thunderlounge (Post 30407705)
Not even in Y? :D

Ok you got me there, like many others I canít even fit in the lav :D

formeraa Nov 8, 18 10:44 am

Instead of arguing over semantics, we should be asking what happened in the Lion Air accident. Why didn't the mechanics fix the problem, before the plane flew again? Did the previous flight crew report the problem in a coherent manner? Is there some sort of software issue that should be corrected? While the 737 has been around for nearly 50 years, this is essentially a new type of aircraft. There are always going to be issues and, unfortunately, accidents until the issues are worked out. We are fortunate these days that accidents are minimized, but look back at history of any commercial aircraft type. No need to get overly worried.

arlflyer Nov 13, 18 6:41 am


Originally Posted by Djokison (Post 30405518)


Thatís your (erroneous) interpretation, then.

This is a heads up, no more, no less. At this point in time there is no reason to believe a MAX flight is any likelier to drop from the sky than any other plane.

Awaiting your update on this, given that the pilots' union and FAA disagree with you.

IADCAflyer Nov 13, 18 8:27 am

This is turning into a rather unpleasant and serious mess for the air frame manufacturer.

econometrics Nov 13, 18 9:08 am


Originally Posted by IADCAflyer (Post 30424828)
This is turning into a rather unpleasant and serious mess for the air frame manufacturer.

Sure is.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/boeing-...ers-1542082575


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