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Admirals Club rates increasing, new restrictions: 2019

Admirals Club rates increasing, new restrictions: 2019

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Old Oct 19, 18, 2:02 am
  #91  
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Originally Posted by ricktoronto View Post
Your membership expires before they impose the same day boarding pass rule and you've paid for it so the price increase is not affecting you so why would they? Don't renew in 2019.

I think this is a great change. You should be flying that day on AA not a competitor. It's AA's lounge not Southwest's etc.

Better yet is quit selling memberships and limit lounges to J and F passengers on qualifying flights.
when lounges first existed they were "exclusive clubs" only available to "top fliers", but the CAB (remember them) ruled that everyone who could/would pay should be permitted access. CAB is gone, but does the "spirit" of their ruling still apply?
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Old Oct 19, 18, 6:31 am
  #92  
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Originally Posted by ricktoronto View Post
Better yet is quit selling memberships and limit lounges to J and F passengers on qualifying flights.
This X 100. Make all J/F purchases lounge qualifying. Then again, that would be lots of "qualified loungers." DFW A has 39 gates? Assuming an average of 8 paying J/D/I on domestic flights, you're up to 300+ loungers per bank. Of course there are tight connections, and much bigger airplanes in the mix, too. All gates aren't always filled / boarding / deplaning anyways, so no easy estimating.

On second thought, maybe the price increase is the good start.

Interesting thoughts here...
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Old Oct 19, 18, 6:46 am
  #93  
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Originally Posted by Dr. HFH View Post
... thus raising the question of whether AA considers a mileage redemption ticket a revenue ticket. IMO it's a revenue ticket, just using a different form of currency.

Separately, this may be to be a good reason for people who fly domestic to post enough miles to QRPC (which I had stopped using) every year to maintain QRPC PLT (OW EMD), which provides AC access, no?
You misunderstand the term. US law defines redemptions as revenue tickets. They are defined in 14 CFR as "zero dollar" in that there is no cash. "Non-revenue" refers to employees, some industry fliers and the like.

For those cancelling now, that is up to them. But, if one can still renew at the current price, one has that for a year. The "sane day" issue does not come into effect until 11/1/2019, so why would that affect a renewal today?
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Old Oct 19, 18, 6:54 am
  #94  
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As it is lines getting the AC (LAX T4 in particular) can be long. Now you are going to need to show a BP on your phone as swiping one's card. Then there will be those fiddling around trying to find their paper BPs.
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Old Oct 19, 18, 7:09 am
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Originally Posted by Often1 View Post
AC's have their greatest value for those with lengthy connections at hubs. For most business travelers, the goal is to spend the least amount of time at airports as possible, so just going to hang out early in an AC doesn't make sense.
Maybe, but I can't count the number of times I get to my airport at T-45, checked in at T-40, and get through security and sit at the gate at T-30 just to see an hour delay on the app pop up. I can only imagine that people at larger airports that need to get there earlier would encounter this more often. I definitely see a benefit in having an AC at one's home airport.


Frankly, I just don't see why anything at all needs to be done with regards to placing institutional limits on access. I've been in AC's during many peak travel times at more than a few airports and I've only seen an AC truly 'crowded' once (ATL during a stormy day; I couldn't even find a place to sit when I first got there so left, but went back 30 minutes later and it was half-emptied). Otherwise, the worse that has happened is the gauc line takes maybe a seemingly grueling 5-10 minutes. This policy change is a solution in search of a problem.
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Old Oct 19, 18, 7:22 am
  #96  
 
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Last edited by AANYC1981; Oct 19, 18 at 11:20 am
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Old Oct 19, 18, 8:15 am
  #97  
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Originally Posted by MarkOK View Post
Maybe, but I can't count the number of times I get to my airport at T-45, checked in at T-40, and get through security and sit at the gate at T-30 just to see an hour delay on the app pop up. I can only imagine that people at larger airports that need to get there earlier would encounter this more often. I definitely see a benefit in having an AC at one's home airport.


Frankly, I just don't see why anything at all needs to be done with regards to placing institutional limits on access. I've been in AC's during many peak travel times at more than a few airports and I've only seen an AC truly 'crowded' once (ATL during a stormy day; I couldn't even find a place to sit when I first got there so left, but went back 30 minutes later and it was half-emptied). Otherwise, the worse that has happened is the gauc line takes maybe a seemingly grueling 5-10 minutes. This policy change is a solution in search of a problem.
100%, not my home but my flight home today started the morning at DFW where my flight to LGA has rolling mech delays (until 10:52 now), I raced to the club and got one of the last two seats on the 10:33. Sure its only 20 minutes if they both leave on time and its a risk, BUT if that delay rolls anymore I could be stuck here for a while. Plus DFW is looking to get nasty weather today so the later it gets the better chance of more delays or a cancellation.
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Old Oct 19, 18, 8:56 am
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No reason for United to keep their policy to their clubs as being "any airline boarding pass that day." They'll match and literally nobody will have the option to use one airline's clubs for their travel regardless of ticketed airline. Reducing to the lowest common denominator. Yawn.
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Old Oct 19, 18, 9:17 am
  #99  
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Originally Posted by LovePrunes View Post
No reason for United to keep their policy to their clubs as being "any airline boarding pass that day." They'll match and literally nobody will have the option to use one airline's clubs for their travel regardless of ticketed airline. Reducing to the lowest common denominator. Yawn.
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Old Oct 19, 18, 9:40 am
  #100  
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Originally Posted by newyorkgeorge View Post
As it is lines getting the AC (LAX T4 in particular) can be long. Now you are going to need to show a BP on your phone as swiping one's card. Then there will be those fiddling around trying to find their paper BPs.
I think it makes sense to scan the BP only for most if the customer is using a OW or partner number that has access (through status or paid membership). Only those who are accruing in a different program would have to show both the membership and the BP (and maybe Alaska situations).

I would get in the habit now of only using the BP if you are an AC member (and flying an allowed carrier with your AA number).
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Old Oct 19, 18, 9:40 am
  #101  
 
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It's been said here many times but I'll just reinforce my opinion that restricting to same day AA is a big devaluation. Generally I don't use their lounge when not flying AA but there are times where it's convenient when on WN. So it seems that UA is the last of the big 3 that allow less restrictive access now.
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Old Oct 19, 18, 10:42 am
  #102  
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I find the ACs are only really crowded during flight delays, usually weather related. Or possibly if one of the ACs is closed for renovations. Even at CLT where its down to just C there is still more than ample seating.
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Old Oct 19, 18, 10:42 am
  #103  
 
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Originally Posted by AlphaTango View Post
Does that mean same day departing boarding pass? I often use the AA club on arrival to grab a coffee and a snack (and sometimes even a shower) before leaving the airport. This would be a major devaluation in the value of club membership for me if so.
I called them to ask, and the agent told me it would be fine as long as I didn't have to go through security. I send them an email as well to get that in writing.
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Old Oct 19, 18, 10:47 am
  #104  
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Originally Posted by nrr View Post
when lounges first existed they were "exclusive clubs" only available to "top fliers", but the CAB (remember them) ruled that everyone who could/would pay should be permitted access. CAB is gone, but does the "spirit" of their ruling still apply?
Not exactly.

When lounges first existed they were kind of like CK, by invitation to VIPs who could influence others supporting the airline. Some may have been top fliers, but more were industrialists, politicians, etc. Iirc they were ultimately required to have more egalitarian access due to civil rights legislation, as their “exclusivity” at least appeared to exclude most women, people of color, etc.

I’m surprised to see that the subject of D0 hasn’t been brought up, as IMO that has been a significant barrier to pre-departure lounge time.
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Old Oct 19, 18, 11:46 am
  #105  
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Originally Posted by JDiver View Post
Not exactly.

When lounges first existed they were kind of like CK, by invitation to VIPs who could influence others supporting the airline. Some may have been top fliers, but more were industrialists, politicians, etc. Iirc they were ultimately required to have more egalitarian access due to civil rights legislation, as their “exclusivity” at least appeared to exclude most women, people of color, etc.

I’m surprised to see that the subject of D0 hasn’t been brought up, as IMO that has been a significant barrier to pre-departure lounge time.
But in any event, the CAB forced airlines to allow access to lounges (for those willing to pay); fast forward to 2018, could AA only permit "upper echelons" to be AC members?
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