Aa crew sharing their saliva with you

Old Nov 20, 17, 4:48 pm
  #61  
 
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Originally Posted by ryan182 View Post
wow are you being intentionally obtuse or do you actually believe that claptrap? So you can identify them, they will deny everything, say there's no proof and the complaint gets round filed.
Seems like someone has a problem with logic, let's dive in.

Odds are, the employee's union will cause the complaint to be thrown out on the grounds of the picture being a violation of the company's policy regarding onboard photography and a violation of the employee's privacy. The conversation that will end up happening will have nothing to do with the incident with the nuts. I've seen it happen.

Originally Posted by ryan182 View Post
And you really want to contend that outside aviation no other employees end up being photographed or recorded when customers think they are doing wrong....thats just embarrassing.
What is embarrassing is that you chose to ignore part of my statement to make your asinine comment. I said "You don't often see it in any industry other than aviation," which is to say the frequency in which is happens seems to be higher in the aviation field but not to say it never happens elsewhere.
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Old Nov 20, 17, 8:00 pm
  #62  
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Originally Posted by anabolism View Post
Thanks for a terrific post! ^

Nothing ironic about it. On some flights, the pillows and/or blankets are washed and wrapped in plastic, but on many they are not. People blow their nose into the blankets, sneeze into the pillows and blankets, wipe their feet on the blankets, prop up their shoes with the pillows, etc. Sick people sneeze into their hands and then adjust the air vent, use the IFE controls, adjust the seat, open the bins and lavatory door, etc. I wipe touch surfaces (including seat belts) with Super Sani-Cloth hospital-grade disinfecting wipes, and use a tissue to open and close the lavatory door. I also wipe touch surfaces in hotel rooms.
So you move the odds of contracting illness from 0.01% to 0.001%. Whatever floats your boat, I guess.

Human skin is an amazing barrier to most germs, thank God. Otherwise, given the bio load on seats, door handles, and every other surface on the planet, we'd all be sick half the time.
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Old Nov 20, 17, 8:38 pm
  #63  
 
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Originally Posted by TheSkyGuy View Post
Seems like someone has a problem with logic, let's dive in.

Odds are, the employee's union will cause the complaint to be thrown out on the grounds of the picture being a violation of the company's policy regarding onboard photography and a violation of the employee's privacy. The conversation that will end up happening will have nothing to do with the incident with the nuts. I've seen it happen.
So in lala land there's video or photographic evidence of someone violating a policy and its "thrown out" because the people violating the policy don't want people documenting them violating policy...yea I'm the one with a logic problem here . So by this "logic" if I record an AA employee stealing from a passengers baggage you think they will be dandy? Or if they are violating a FAR...sure no problemo the pax shouldn't have recorded that. FWIW the incident in question is most certainly a health code violation - good luck with your "we cant be photographed" defense.

What is embarrassing is that you chose to ignore part of my statement to make your asinine comment. I said "You don't often see it in any industry other than aviation," which is to say the frequency in which is happens seems to be higher in the aviation field but not to say it never happens elsewhere.
I didn't ingore it at all, the simple fact is its 2017 - everyone in any industry that's customer facing has or will have incidents whereby customers record them and post to social media and you have exactly 0 data to support the contention that it happens more in aviation which makes sense because there is none and you're wrong.
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Old Nov 20, 17, 9:09 pm
  #64  
 
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Originally Posted by DenverBrian View Post
So you move the odds of contracting illness from 0.01% to 0.001%. Whatever floats your boat, I guess.

Human skin is an amazing barrier to most germs, thank God. Otherwise, given the bio load on seats, door handles, and every other surface on the planet, we'd all be sick half the time.
Many frequent flyers do get sick roughly half the time they fly. I used to, before becoming more careful. I know my coworkers do, too. I'm not sure what your point is about skin. I never suggested we get infected through osmosis. More likely, a sick person sneezes into his/her hands, touches surfaces, someone not sick touches the surfaces and later scratches his or her nose or eye, and three days later comes down with a cold or flu.
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Old Nov 20, 17, 9:23 pm
  #65  
 
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Originally Posted by anabolism View Post
Thanks for a terrific post! ^

Nothing ironic about it. On some flights, the pillows and/or blankets are washed and wrapped in plastic, but on many they are not. People blow their nose into the blankets, sneeze into the pillows and blankets, wipe their feet on the blankets, prop up their shoes with the pillows, etc. Sick people sneeze into their hands and then adjust the air vent, use the IFE controls, adjust the seat, open the bins and lavatory door, etc. I wipe touch surfaces (including seat belts) with Super Sani-Cloth hospital-grade disinfecting wipes, and use a tissue to open and close the lavatory door. I also wipe touch surfaces in hotel rooms.

I understand there are no guarantees. A FA may wash his or her hands before serving, but pick up the dirty dishes and utensils of a sick passenger before bringing me my meal. The wipes help improve the odds.
How's it work dating? Or with your significant other? I mean the number of wipes you have to have to make your sterile bubble must be overwhelming. Embrace the germs. All the hospital grade anti-bacterial stuff is lowering people's body's immune system, makes it harder to fight of the germs that you forgot to wipe off in the rental car, the rental car shuttle, the grocery store, the theme park, at school, at work, I mean really.

This thread really needs to be re titled, and germaphobes relax.
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Old Nov 20, 17, 10:46 pm
  #66  
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Originally Posted by anabolism View Post
Many frequent flyers do get sick roughly half the time they fly. I used to, before becoming more careful. I know my coworkers do, too. I'm not sure what your point is about skin. I never suggested we get infected through osmosis. More likely, a sick person sneezes into his/her hands, touches surfaces, someone not sick touches the surfaces and later scratches his or her nose or eye, and three days later comes down with a cold or flu.
"Many" frequent flyers get sick half the time they fly? Source? Other than your coworkers?

I'll see your anecdote and raise you my own: I haven't gotten sick from flying in any of over 1,000 flights over the last 20 years. None of my coworkers have either.
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Old Nov 20, 17, 11:20 pm
  #67  
 
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Originally Posted by DenverBrian View Post
Human skin is an amazing barrier to most germs, thank God. Otherwise, given the bio load on seats, door handles, and every other surface on the planet, we'd all be sick half the time.
True... human skin is somewhat impervious. But, there is always a pathway. You have broken, chapped skin, a rash, a cut, etc. Now your barrier is broken:

Once the germs are on the surface of your "barrier" people touch noses, mouths, eyes and pass the germs across mucosal membranes and what have you.

Alcohol wipes will help keep some organisms in control, others it will have no effect.
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Old Nov 21, 17, 5:07 am
  #68  
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This thread has gone off the tracks and traveled from hyperbole to extensive medical discussion and speculation. Some posters have begun posting opinion etc. about other posters. This thread will rest now.

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