Specific Plane details?

Old Dec 11, 18, 8:25 pm
  #16  
 
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Originally Posted by ASA_1 View Post
Facts and data matter. It's ignorant and insulting to the industry to suggest such a broad stroke accusation as fact. We should all be champions of safety and constantly set the bar higher. Out of respect for the men and women who make their living maintaining these incredibly complex engineering marvels, please leave it to the NTSB and the FAA to determine whether there's a cultural problem at an airline - that's why we give them our tax dollars.
I strongly disagree with that suggestion. I will form my own conclusions and make my own decisions accordingly. When I see one airline going decades without incident, and another having a clear pattern of issues, I'm not flying the airline with the issues, regardless of whether the FAA and NTSB uncover any problems.
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Old Dec 11, 18, 8:32 pm
  #17  
 
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Originally Posted by VegasGambler View Post
I strongly disagree with that suggestion. I will form my own conclusions and make my own decisions accordingly. When I see one airline going decades without incident, and another having a clear pattern of issues, I'm not flying the airline with the issues, regardless of whether the FAA and NTSB uncover any problems.
Absolutely, that's 100% your right as a member of the flying public - using the power of one's wallet to show dissatisfaction with a company's practices definitely get's their attention! That's the beauty of competition, and capitalism at it's finest!

But l stand by my point - let the facts and data, and trained professionals draw conclusions of root causes of problems - not wikipedia pages or opinions.
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Old Dec 11, 18, 8:57 pm
  #18  
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Good luck, James. Here's to safe flights through clear skies in the coming years. ^

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Old Dec 11, 18, 9:15 pm
  #19  
 
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Just remember that on every flight 2 of the most knowledgeable experts on that flight are sitting up in the cockpit. Moreover, they spend more time in the air in those aircraft than virtually any civilian on this board. Finally they generally have just as much interest in getting home at the end of the trip as you do. I'm not suggesting that being curious and even concerned about airline safety standards isn't ok - just that the men and women up front are far more exposed to any hazards than any of us. It's particularly difficult to even answer a question of when a plane last had maintenance because there many levels of maintenance, each with its own rolling schedule based on both flight hours and aircraft cycles (takeoff/landings). The flip answer is that whatever plane you are on probably last had "maintenance" within the last few days. At the other extreme is a heavy "D" check that probably happens every 5-10 years - but then it is nearly a rebuild of the aircraft. While it is nice in some sense to fly new aircraft look at Delta who has focused on older aircraft and yet has some of the most reliable flight dispatch in the industry. Overall, if you are flying a US or other western carrier you're going to be in good shape. As someone who did some flying on post Soviet Union startup airlines that flew old (even by their standards) Tupolov jets believe me on that one.
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Old Dec 12, 18, 8:34 am
  #20  
 
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Originally Posted by VegasGambler View Post
To compare: AS had a plane crash 19 years ago, and everyone on board died. It was partially caused by a deviation from standard inspection intervals (not letting them off the hook) but the FAA signed off on it. That is absolutely a tragedy, and they had some fault, but it's not a pattern. They have not had an incident since.
A bit more than that:

Business & Technology No criminal charges against Alaska; airline settles with whistle-blower Seattle Times Newspaper

In fairness, AS made changes in the wake of both incidents according to media reports and I have no real personal concerns about flying them.

Last edited by rustykettel; Dec 12, 18 at 8:41 am
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Old Dec 12, 18, 11:19 am
  #21  
 
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Almost every terminal incident cites “Pilots failure to...”
Personally the two fine folks up front will have a larger impact than the condition of the airframe. Between flying the Q400 and Horizon 175 I still lean with Q400 for pilots. In the 175 my trust is in the systems. Eventually Horizon will be familiar with the 175 to the same level but it takes time. Even with the mass hiring to replace the Q400 pilots who moved to the 175, there is still enough experience in the cockpit.
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Old Dec 12, 18, 12:18 pm
  #22  
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Originally Posted by pdx1M View Post
Just remember that on every flight 2 of the most knowledgeable experts on that flight are sitting up in the cockpit. Moreover, they spend more time in the air in those aircraft than virtually any civilian on this board. Finally they generally have just as much interest in getting home at the end of the trip as you do. I'm not suggesting that being curious and even concerned about airline safety standards isn't ok - just that the men and women up front are far more exposed to any hazards than any of us. It's particularly difficult to even answer a question of when a plane last had maintenance because there many levels of maintenance, each with its own rolling schedule based on both flight hours and aircraft cycles (takeoff/landings). The flip answer is that whatever plane you are on probably last had "maintenance" within the last few days. At the other extreme is a heavy "D" check that probably happens every 5-10 years - but then it is nearly a rebuild of the aircraft. While it is nice in some sense to fly new aircraft look at Delta who has focused on older aircraft and yet has some of the most reliable flight dispatch in the industry. Overall, if you are flying a US or other western carrier you're going to be in good shape. As someone who did some flying on post Soviet Union startup airlines that flew old (even by their standards) Tupolov jets believe me on that one.
Lots of concerns raised here and some good points as well. Thanks to pdx1M for his concise response above. This pretty much sums it up for me and always has, which only goes to underscore how unnecessary and generally unwarranted all of these pre-flight concerns are for those flying aboard the vast majority of non-Third World airlines.

It's not that I don't care or am totally unaware of these safety issues, but as I approach my 5,521st flight and 5.43 millionth mile safely flown aboard exactly 200 airlines around the world, the least of my concerns is aircraft maintenance practices. Keep it simple. Enjoy the flight. Oh, and may I get another dash of Tabasco with that Bloody Mary, please?
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