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Grounding of 737 Max - Effect on AC incl OMNI 767 lease

Old Mar 12, 2019, 11:26 am
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Last edit by: yyznomad
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Originally Posted by https://www.aircanada.com/ca/en/aco/home/book/travel-news-and-updates/2019/737-airspace-closure.html
If you currently have a reservation for a flight between now and September 02, 2019 that was scheduled to be operated by a Boeing 737 MAX aircraft, we've implemented a policy that makes it possible for you to make voluntary changes to your itinerary within three (3) weeks of your original travel dates.
Read below for more details.

Air Canada Timetable Effective June 27, 2019 to September 29, 2019 (AC's link: https://services.aircanada.com/porta...metable-en.pdf)
Air Canada Timetable Effective June 20, 2019 to September 22, 2019
Air Canada Timetable Effective June 13, 2019 to September 15, 2019
Air Canada Timetable Effective June 6, 2019 to September 8, 2019
Air Canada Timetable Effective May 30, 2019 to September 1, 2019
Air Canada Timetable Effective May 23, 2019 to August 25, 2019
Air Canada Timetable Effective May 16, 2019 to August 18, 2019
Air Canada Timetable Effective May 9, 2019 to August 11, 2019
Air Canada Timetable Effective May 2, 2019 to August 4, 2019
Air Canada Timetable Effective April 25, 2019 to July 28, 2019
Air Canada Timetable Effective April 18, 2019 to July 21, 2019
Air Canada Timetable Effective April 11, 2019 to July 14, 2019
Air Canada Timetable Effective March 28, 2019 to June 30, 2019



May 29, 2019
If you are travelling within the next 72 hours, call:

1-833-354-5963

If you booked through a Travel Agency, please call them for immediate assistance
In compliance with Transport Canada's safety notice closing Canadian airspace to Boeing 737 MAX aircraft operations, Air Canada has grounded its 24 737 MAX aircraft until further notice.Air Canada is now updating its May, June and July schedule to further optimize its fleet and re-accommodate customers. Because the timeline for the return to service of the 737 Max is unknown, for planning purposes and to provide customers certainty for booking and travel, Air Canada is removing all 737 MAX aircraft from its schedule until at least September 02, 2019. A summary of schedule changes for April is posted below in the following question and answer: "What is Air Canada doing to reschedule customers?". Additional schedule changes will be posted as warranted.
  • Air Canada's cancellation and rebooking policies are in place with full fee waiver for affected customers.
  • We are working to rebook impacted customers as soon as possible.
  • Given the magnitude of our 737 MAX operations which on average carry nine to twelve thousand customers per day, customers can expect delays in rebooking and in reaching Air Canada Call Centres.
  • If you are travelling within the next 72 hours, please call the number at the top of this page.
  • If you booked through a Travel Agent, you may contact them directly for assistance.
We appreciate our customers' patience as we work to get everyone on their way.

If you'd like to make other plansIf you currently have a reservation for a flight between now and September 02, 2019 that was scheduled to be operated by a Boeing 737 MAX aircraft, we've implemented a policy that makes it possible for you to make voluntary changes to your itinerary within three (3) weeks of your original travel dates.If you are impacted by this policy, you may contact Air Canada Reservations (1-888-247-2262). If you are travelling in the next 72 hours, please call Air Canada Reservations number at the top of this notice. If you purchased your ticket with AeroplanExternal site which may not meet accessibility guidelines., or Air Canada Vacations or your travel agent, please contact them directly.

****

March 19, 2019

UPDATED - INFORMATION ON IMPACTED ROUTES


**********

UPDATED - Air Canada Responds to Transport Canada's Closure of Canadian Airspace to the Boeing 737 MAX Aircraft

https://www.aircanada.com/ca/en/aco/...e-closure.html

March 19, 2019

If you are travelling within the next 72 hours, call:

1-833-354-5963

If you booked through a Travel Agency, please call them for immediate assistance

In compliance with Transport Canadas safety notice closing Canadian airspace to Boeing 737 MAX aircraft operations, Air Canada has grounded its 24 737 MAX aircraft until further notice.

Air Canada is now updating its April and May schedule to further optimize its fleet and re-accommodate customers. Because the timeline for the return to service of the 737 Max is unknown, for planning purposes and to provide customers certainty for booking and travel, Air Canada is removing all 737 MAX aircraft from its schedule until at least July 1, 2019. A summary of schedule changes for April is posted below in the following question and answer: What is Air Canada doing to reschedule customers?. Additional schedule changes will be posted as warranted.
  • Air Canada's cancellation and rebooking policies are in place with full fee waiver for affected customers.
  • We are working to rebook impacted customers as soon as possible.
  • Given the magnitude of our 737 MAX operations which on average carry nine to twelve thousand customers per day, customers can expect delays in rebooking and in reaching Air Canada Call Centres.
  • If you are travelling within the next 72 hours, please call the number at the top of this page.
  • If you booked through a Travel Agent, you may contact them directly for assistance.
We appreciate our customers' patience as we work to get everyone on their way.

If you'd like to make other plans

If you currently have a reservation for a flight that was scheduled to be operated by a Boeing 737 MAX aircraft, we've implemented a policy that makes it possible for you to make voluntary changes to your itinerary within three (3) weeks of your original travel dates.

If you are impacted by this policy, you may contact Air Canada Reservations (1-888-247-2262). If you are travelling in the next 72 hours, please call Air Canada Reservations number at the top of this notice.

If you purchased your ticket with Aeroplan, or Air Canada Vacations or your travel agent, please contact them directly.


*********
March 13, 2019

Air Canada confirmed today that it will comply immediately with Transport Canada's safety notice closing Canadian airspace to Boeing 737 MAX aircraft operations until further notice.

Air Canada's cancellation and rebooking policies are in place with full fee waiver for affected customers. We are working to rebook impacted customers as soon as possible. Given the magnitude of our 737 MAX operations which on average carry nine to twelve thousand customers per day, customers can expect delays in rebooking and in reaching Air Canada Call Centres. Priority will be given to customers travelling within the next 72 hours. We appreciate our customers' patience.

If you'd like to know what type of aircraft you are flying on, simply retrieve your booking from the My Bookings tab, then click on the 'Details' link in the Flight Details section. We also advise you to check the status of your flight before heading to the airport.

We fully support Transport Canada's decision and will continue to work with them towards a resolution of this situation as soon as possible.

Alternate Travel Plans
If you currently have a reservation for a flight operated by a Boeing 737 MAX aircraft, we've implemented a policy that makes it possible for you to make voluntary changes to your itinerary within three (3) weeks of your original travel dates.

If you are impacted by this policy, you may contact Air Canada Reservations (1-888-247-2262).

If you purchased your ticket with AeroplanExternal site which may not meet accessibility guidelines., or Air Canada Vacations or your Travel agent, please contact them directly Some questions you may have are below with our answers, but if you can't find what you need, contact us at 1-888-247-2262, or reach out to us on on FacebookExternal site which may not meet accessibility guidelines. or TwitterExternal site which may not meet accessibility guidelines..

How many Boeing 737 MAX aircraft does Air Canada have?
Air Canada has a fleet of 24 Boeing 737 MAX-8 aircraft, which have been in operation since 2017. We have a total fleet of 400 aircraft (including 24 737MAX), comprising Air Canada mainline, Air Canada Rouge and Air Canada Express aircraft.

Where do the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft fly to?
These aircraft operate flights across North America, to Mexico, the Caribbean, Hawaii, as well as from Atlantic Canada to London Heathrow.

How many Boeing 737 MAX flights are there each day, and how many passengers are affected?
We typically operate approximately 75 Boeing 737 MAX flights daily out of a total schedule of approximately 1,600 daily flights system-wide, representing less than six percent of our total flying.

We have a total fleet of 400 aircraft (including 24 Boeing 737 MAX), comprising Air Canada mainline, Air Canada Rouge and Air Canada Express aircraft.

What is Air Canada doing to reschedule customers?
We are making adjustments to our schedule to minimize the disruption to customers as much as possible, by optimizing the deployment of the rest of our fleet and looking at alternative options, including accommodating customers on other airlines.

As an example of some of our adjustments to Boeing 737 MAX flights cancelled, we have re-scheduled widebody aircraft to serve Hawaii starting today, March 13. Some flights will operate as scheduled with mainline or Air Canada Rouge aircraft, such as on Montreal-Martinique and Montreal-Guadeloupe. Other routes, notably Halifax-London and St. John's-London are cancelled in the short term, with customers being re-routed through our Montreal and Toronto hubs.

What should I do right now?
As changes are finalized in our flight schedule, customers whose flight times or flight numbers have changed can expect to receive an email detailing their updated itinerary. This information is also available in My Bookings on the Air Canada App.

If you are travelling soon, you can also contact us or your travel agent. Please understand that priority is being given to customers travelling within the next 72 hours.

We have also put in place a rebooking policy, space permitting, and without additional fees for affected customers. Given the magnitude of our Boeing 737 MAX operations, which on average carry nine to twelve thousand customers per day, customers can expect delays in rebooking and in reaching Air Canada's Call Centres.

Where can I go to for more information?
If you would like to know what type of aircraft you are flying on, simply retrieve your booking from the My Bookings tab, then click on the 'Details' link in the Flight Details section.

If you are travelling soon, you can contact us, reach out to our social media teams on FacebookExternal site which may not meet accessibility guidelines. or TwitterExternal site which may not meet accessibility guidelines., or call your travel agent.

We also advise you to check the status of your flight before going to the airport.

We thank all of our customers for their patience.

Will Air Canada cover my out-of-pocket expenses such as additional accommodation costs that I may incur as a result of these disruptions?
Our normal protocol for irregular events which are out of our control is in effect. We are regrettably unable to reimburse for such expenses.



****


MONTREAL, March 13, 2019 /CNW Telbec/ - Air Canada confirmed today that it will comply immediately with Transport Canada's safety notice closing Canadian airspace to Boeing 737 MAX aircraft operations until further notice.

Air Canada's cancellation and rebooking policies are in place with full fee waiver for affected customers. We are working to rebook impacted customers as soon as possible but given the magnitude of our 737 MAX operations which on average carry nine to twelve thousand customers per day, customers can expect delays in rebooking and in reaching Air Canada call centres and we appreciate our customers' patience.

Customers are further advised to check the status of their flight on aircanada.com prior to going to the airport.

We fully support this decision and will continue to work with Transport Canada towards resolution of this situation as soon as possible.


SOURCE Air Canada

For further information: Isabelle Arthur (Montral), [email protected], 514 422-5788; Peter Fitzpatrick (Toronto), [email protected], 416 263-5576; Angela Mah (Vancouver), [email protected], 604 270-5741; Internet: aircanada.com

https://aircanada.mediaroom.com/2019...7-MAX-Aircraft




https://www.aircanada.com/ca/en/aco/...to-london.html

Originally Posted by ac.com
Information on Air Canada Halifax-London and St. Johns-London service

March 12, 2019

Due to the UK's Civil Aviation Authority banning all Boeing 737 Max aircraft operations in the U.K. Air Canada has cancelled the following flights:

AC 860 Halifax London-Heathrow on March 12
AC861 London-Halifax on March 13
AC822 St. Johns-London on March 13
AC823London-St. Johns on March 14

We are working to rebook impacted customers as soon as possible through our Montreal, Toronto and Ottawa hubs.

Affected customers may contact Air Canada Reservations to change their flights to another date free of charge.

As well, due to anticipated call volumes, customers can expect delays reaching Air Canada call centres, so we appreciate our customers patience.

Air Canada will provide updates as more information becomes available.
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Grounding of 737 Max - Effect on AC incl OMNI 767 lease

Old May 8, 2019, 6:01 pm
  #751  
 
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AC has ~98% of their flights happening. Presumably they need ~98% of pilot hours, and there would be enough to keep them busy.

I don't think anyone is getting OT this quarter, though.
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Old May 8, 2019, 6:21 pm
  #752  
 
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Originally Posted by RangerNS
AC has ~98% of their flights happening. Presumably they need ~98% of pilot hours, and there would be enough to keep them busy.

I don't think anyone is getting OT this quarter, though.
Pilots are certified by a/c type though, you can't just put a Max 8 pilot on an A320 or 777. And some were likely hired from outside the company.
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Old May 8, 2019, 6:25 pm
  #753  
 
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Originally Posted by RangerNS
AC has ~98% of their flights happening. Presumably they need ~98% of pilot hours, and there would be enough to keep them busy.

I don't think anyone is getting OT this quarter, though.
98% of flying on 24 less aircraft, with over 400 pilots grounded? I'll guarantee some are getting OT this quarter.
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Old May 8, 2019, 7:07 pm
  #754  
 
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Originally Posted by ChrisA330
98% of flying on 24 less aircraft, with over 400 pilots grounded? I'll guarantee some are getting OT this quarter.
Right. While the Max pilots sit and watch (or do training, etc), I'm guessing the rest of the crews (like the rest of the fleet) are stretched as much as they can
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Old May 9, 2019, 1:10 am
  #755  
 
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Originally Posted by Resurrection
Pilots are certified by a/c type though, you can't just put a Max 8 pilot on an A320 or 777. And some were likely hired from outside the company.
Type ratings don't just disappear because a pilot has done a new one. The 737Max pilots would've been mostly drawn from existing E90 and 320 type certificate holders, and I don't see why they couldn't just do checkride or two with a management training/check captain and be back on those planes.
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Old May 9, 2019, 6:07 am
  #756  
 
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How Can Air Canada Nail the 737 Max's Return to Service?

"Good morning from the flight deck. This is your captain speaking. I'm pleased to announce that you are on the very first 737 revenue flight since it was pulled from service in every country in the world for being unsafe to fly. Thankfully Boeing visited last week, jammed a thumb drive in this here USB port, upgraded the firmware, rebooted the plane, and now we're 100% good to go. We promise. Or we're pretty sure, anyway. So sit back, relax, and enjoy your flight."

Silly scenario, but with a serious question behind it: How can Air Canada nail the 737 Max's return to service? We know that at some point in the near future, Boeing will finalize their updates, the FAA will give it the nod, and Boeing will run the software update on all their aircraft. Transport Canada will eventually give the nod as well, and Air Canada will declare it ready to fly. This could be weeks away, it could be months away, but at some point it's going to happen. How can Air Canada get this plane back in the air in a way that is fair and accommodating to their customerswhich is to say, to you and me?

I'm thinking here especially of those tens of thousands of people who have already purchased tickets on upcoming Max flights (some of whom did so before the grounding, some of whom did so during the grounding). And even more especially, I'm thinking of the people who will end up being on those very first Max flights in those first days and weeks. As long as the grounding remains in effect, they are being booked onto other flights and aircraft, but what happens to them when the plane returns to the skies? Will Air Canada have a grace period in which they allow people to switch from the Max to other aircraft without penalties? And what will they do for flights to destinations that are only serviced by the Max, such as Honolulu (at least until the YYZ-HNL flights begin in the winter)? Will they accommodate those concerned passengers on other airlines? And what will they do for people who have booked a flight on an Airbus 320 but show up at the airport to find it's been swapped for a Max?

I'd love to know what your thoughts are on how Air Canada can nail what's bound to be a tough situation. What would make you feel listened to and cared for by Air Canada?
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Old May 9, 2019, 6:14 am
  #757  
 
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While they are parked: Expand the size of the J lav and install Wifi on every plane. ��
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Old May 9, 2019, 6:24 am
  #758  
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Originally Posted by WestAust
Mitigations

To mitigate the impact, Air Canada has substituted different aircraft on 737 MAX routes, including flying routes with similar-sized or larger aircraft. To help provide this replacement flying, the carrier has extended leases for three Airbus A320 and three Embraer 190 aircraft which were scheduled to exit the fleet.

Air Canada is also accelerating the in-take of six Airbus A321 aircraft from WOW Air into its fleet. For customer comfort, the first four of these aircraft, despite being less than three years old, are being reconfigured, equipped with Wi-Fi and repainted in Air Canada Rouge livery and will begin entering the fleet in May, a month earlier than scheduled. The remaining two will enter service later.

Working with Other Airlines

The carrier is working with other airlines to provide immediate extra capacity and provide alternative options to customers. Air Canada's Montreal-Frankfurt flight for the month of May will be operated by Star Alliance partner Lufthansa.

Air Canada is now finalizing capacity agreements with other airlines to temporarily operate flights on its behalf, subject to government approvals and conclusion of final documentation. Beginning June 15, Qatar Airways will operate one Airbus A330-200 on daily flights between Montreal and Barcelona and one Airbus A330-200 daily flight between Montreal and Paris. Beginning June 2, Omni Air International will operate flights with one Boeing 767-200ER aircraft between Vancouver and Honolulu and Maui.

Full news release
https://www.newswire.ca/news-release...876555232.html
From the article referenced (and something similar appears on ac.com), it says:

Originally Posted by www.newswire.ca
News provided by Air Canada Apr 25, 2019, 14:52 ET

Air Canada has put in place a flexible rebooking policy with full fee waiver and a refund option for affected customers. Customers originally scheduled to travel on a 737 MAX can call Air Canada at 1-833-354-5963 for information within 72 hours of their planned flight. Customers who have booked flights through a Travel Agent should contact them for immediate assistance.
From ac.com:

Originally Posted by https://www.aircanada.com/ca/en/aco/home/book/travel-news-and-updates/2019/737-airspace-closure.html
If you'd like to make other plansIf you currently have a reservation for a flight between now and July 31, 2019 that was scheduled to be operated by a Boeing 737 MAX aircraft, we've implemented a policy that makes it possible for you to make voluntary changes to your itinerary within three (3) weeks of your original travel dates.If you are impacted by this policy, you may contact Air Canada Reservations (1-888-247-2262). If you are travelling in the next 72 hours, please call Air Canada Reservations number at the top of this notice.
Looking to the future, will AC allow a similar free change/extended grace period once the 7M8 is put back into service?
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Old May 9, 2019, 7:55 am
  #759  
 
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Originally Posted by TheCanuckian
"Good morning from the flight deck. This is your captain speaking. I'm pleased to announce that you are on the very first 737 revenue flight since it was pulled from service in every country in the world for being unsafe to fly. Thankfully Boeing visited last week, jammed a thumb drive in this here USB port, upgraded the firmware, rebooted the plane, and now we're 100% good to go. We promise. Or we're pretty sure, anyway. So sit back, relax, and enjoy your flight."

Silly scenario, but with a serious question behind it: How can Air Canada nail the 737 Max's return to service? We know that at some point in the near future, Boeing will finalize their updates, the FAA will give it the nod, and Boeing will run the software update on all their aircraft. Transport Canada will eventually give the nod as well, and Air Canada will declare it ready to fly. This could be weeks away, it could be months away, but at some point it's going to happen. How can Air Canada get this plane back in the air in a way that is fair and accommodating to their customerswhich is to say, to you and me?

I'm thinking here especially of those tens of thousands of people who have already purchased tickets on upcoming Max flights (some of whom did so before the grounding, some of whom did so during the grounding). And even more especially, I'm thinking of the people who will end up being on those very first Max flights in those first days and weeks. As long as the grounding remains in effect, they are being booked onto other flights and aircraft, but what happens to them when the plane returns to the skies? Will Air Canada have a grace period in which they allow people to switch from the Max to other aircraft without penalties? And what will they do for flights to destinations that are only serviced by the Max, such as Honolulu (at least until the YYZ-HNL flights begin in the winter)? Will they accommodate those concerned passengers on other airlines? And what will they do for people who have booked a flight on an Airbus 320 but show up at the airport to find it's been swapped for a Max?

I'd love to know what your thoughts are on how Air Canada can nail what's bound to be a tough situation. What would make you feel listened to and cared for by Air Canada?
These are good questions. I don't think anyone can answer them just yet. I suspect a big part of it will be how well BOEING nails the Max return to service. Will they be super open about the issues, the fixes, the process, the testing, etc. Will independent aviation experts be involved in the process? I believe that will very much set the tone, so to speak, for the return to flight. Then, based on the public sentiment, AC can set its policy.

Another interesting question, to me, is timing. It's not at all clear to me that all airlines will resume service at the same time. Some countries may take additional weeks or months to study the changes, etc. Therefore, if AC is one of the first airlines to return to service, they will have a much harder PR job then if they are one of the last airlines to return to service.
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Old May 9, 2019, 8:56 am
  #760  
 
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Originally Posted by TheCanuckian
"Good morning from the flight deck. This is your captain speaking. I'm pleased to announce that you are on the very first 737 revenue flight since it was pulled from service in every country in the world for being unsafe to fly. Thankfully Boeing visited last week, jammed a thumb drive in this here USB port, upgraded the firmware, rebooted the plane, and now we're 100% good to go. We promise. Or we're pretty sure, anyway. So sit back, relax, and enjoy your flight."

Silly scenario, but with a serious question behind it: How can Air Canada nail the 737 Max's return to service? We know that at some point in the near future, Boeing will finalize their updates, the FAA will give it the nod, and Boeing will run the software update on all their aircraft. Transport Canada will eventually give the nod as well, and Air Canada will declare it ready to fly. This could be weeks away, it could be months away, but at some point it's going to happen. How can Air Canada get this plane back in the air in a way that is fair and accommodating to their customerswhich is to say, to you and me?

I'm thinking here especially of those tens of thousands of people who have already purchased tickets on upcoming Max flights (some of whom did so before the grounding, some of whom did so during the grounding). And even more especially, I'm thinking of the people who will end up being on those very first Max flights in those first days and weeks. As long as the grounding remains in effect, they are being booked onto other flights and aircraft, but what happens to them when the plane returns to the skies? Will Air Canada have a grace period in which they allow people to switch from the Max to other aircraft without penalties? And what will they do for flights to destinations that are only serviced by the Max, such as Honolulu (at least until the YYZ-HNL flights begin in the winter)? Will they accommodate those concerned passengers on other airlines? And what will they do for people who have booked a flight on an Airbus 320 but show up at the airport to find it's been swapped for a Max?

I'd love to know what your thoughts are on how Air Canada can nail what's bound to be a tough situation. What would make you feel listened to and cared for by Air Canada?

Boeing is on the hook here. Yes, Airlines have a PR problem after the "fix" is implemented because the public is very sensitive to these types of things. But, just like any safety critical component - the number of hours required to verify the fix will be very significant, and will support the reentry into service. But, yes, your scenario is interesting.. even after 50,000 hours of testing (made up number, of course), there will always be that first public flight.
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Old May 9, 2019, 9:41 am
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Originally Posted by Toddcan
But, just like any safety critical component - the number of hours required to verify the fix will be very significant, and will support the reentry into service.
Kind of hard to say that with a straight face. There is tons of evidence indicating that safety-critical testing was rushed or skipped entirely which is how we got into this situation in the first place
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Old May 9, 2019, 10:26 am
  #762  
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Originally Posted by TheCanuckian
How can Air Canada nail the 737 Max's return to service? We know that at some point in the near future, Boeing will finalize their updates, the FAA will give it the nod, and Boeing will run the software update on all their aircraft. Transport Canada will eventually give the nod as well, and Air Canada will declare it ready to fly. This could be weeks away, it could be months away, but at some point it's going to happen. How can Air Canada get this plane back in the air in a way that is fair and accommodating to their customerswhich is to say, to you and me?
As quitely as possible - just gets inserted back into the schedule with no fanfare at all.

Somewhere buried on AC's website they post something that explains the steps Boeing, FAA, Transport Canada and AC have taken to ensure a safe return to service. Staff are trained to memorize the lines from that page and can refer people to it.
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Old May 9, 2019, 10:37 am
  #763  
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Originally Posted by The Lev

Somewhere buried on AC's website they post something that explains the steps Boeing, FAA, Transport Canada and AC have taken to ensure a safe return to service.
Except, Rovinescu is on record as having promised that AC would do their own safety review on top of these. This said, even after their own review (on which I would not put too much weight anyway) I would hope they only follow these outfits if the EASA is also on board. Given that the EASA has much less at stake and is in a position to be more objective, competition with AB notwithstanding.
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Old May 9, 2019, 10:52 am
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Originally Posted by The Lev
As quitely as possible - just gets inserted back into the schedule with no fanfare at all.

Somewhere buried on AC's website they post something that explains the steps Boeing, FAA, Transport Canada and AC have taken to ensure a safe return to service. Staff are trained to memorize the lines from that page and can refer people to it.
Given AC's track record, that very well might be what happens. But silence is never a good PR strategy. If you don't tell the story your way, someone else is going to tell it for you, and you probably won't like the way they do. The return to service will be front page news across the country, whether or not AC choses to talk about it
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Old May 9, 2019, 1:15 pm
  #765  
 
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Originally Posted by kjnangre
Given AC's track record, that very well might be what happens. But silence is never a good PR strategy. If you don't tell the story your way, someone else is going to tell it for you, and you probably won't like the way they do. The return to service will be front page news across the country, whether or not AC choses to talk about it
Exactly so. All the major media will cover it, which means many of the passengers will have an awareness that they are on one of those early flights.
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