Flight Attendant Strike as early as Sept 21

Old Sep 15, 11, 9:11 am
  #61  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Little dot on map
Programs: AA-PlatLife, BA-Gold, SPG-LTP, HL-DIA
Posts: 25,735
I hope when you say CP, you meant Cathay Pacific (which is actually CX) !
Guy Betsy is offline  
Old Sep 15, 11, 9:15 am
  #62  
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: YYC
Programs: AC QR WS*S
Posts: 372
Originally Posted by Guy Betsy View Post
I hope when you say CP, you meant Cathay Pacific (which is actually CX) !
You don't think that a defunct Canadian ariline currently offers excellent international service? Why isn't there a facepalm smiley here?
kelapstick is offline  
Old Sep 15, 11, 9:32 am
  #63  
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: YEG
Posts: 3,718
Originally Posted by Guy Betsy View Post
I hope when you say CP, you meant Cathay Pacific (which is actually CX) !
yeah, some of these are lost on me; CO,UA,US,AC,LH, all make perfect sence. CX,LX? lol Dont know where they get that, but yeah!

But then again, I guess it is like alot of our Canadian airport codes.... some make sence, some seem as random as the socks i'm wearing!
hearna is offline  
Old Sep 15, 11, 9:38 am
  #64  
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: YYC
Programs: AC QR WS*S
Posts: 372
Originally Posted by hearna View Post
yeah, some of these are lost on me; CO,UA,US,AC,LH, all make perfect sence. CX,LX? lol Dont know where they get that, but yeah!

But then again, I guess it is like alot of our Canadian airport codes.... some make sence, some seem as random as the socks i'm wearing!
When Canadian Airlines was formed it likely inherited CP from Canadian Pacific Airlines which was founded 4 years earlier than CX. I suspect the X is likely to simulate the "ific" in Pacific.

Canadian airport codes, don't get me started...

Last edited by kelapstick; Sep 15, 11 at 9:39 am Reason: I have poor grammar
kelapstick is offline  
Old Sep 15, 11, 10:10 am
  #65  
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: YYC
Programs: AC Basic, UA MP Gold, Marriott Gold Elite, SPG Gold, Amex Platinum
Posts: 2,989
Originally Posted by hearna View Post
I doubt it.... Ground agents are easy to train, alot less responsibility, and can work with reduced numbers. I mean, you don't need 2 gate agents if you actualy start boarding a few minutes earlyer, and dont do stand bys and upgrades etc. If you warn people to travel light and that baggage lines will be super long, and reduce the front staff, fine. If you tell people to buy tickets online, etc etc. The number of FA's per aircraft type is regulated, and they cannot cut corners here. And these people need to be trained on the saftey features of these aircraft and what to do in the event of a multitude of different emergencies.... If the FA's strike, it deff won't be as smooth as the last strike.... However, contracting alot of flights thru the staralliance (LH, LX to europe) (SQ to asia), CO/US/UA to the states, and getting all of Chorus (JAZZ's) planes up in the air and replacing E75s/E90s with CRJs/CRAs, doing the best they can on the bigger runs (yyz-yvr) etc, and perhalps cansel flights that leave every hour or so and combine 2 of them on a widebodie with minimum staff, they have options!

Of course, there may be a last minute settlement cause all those options will cost AC alot of cash!
Training a FA takes 5-7 days depending on how many a/c types Management would like each FA to fly. It can be done in 5 days if the FA groups are split amongst the major types (Embraer, Narrowbody Airbus, Widebody).

The 5-7 days training gets the basics of customer service plus all the safety training and safety exams completed.

Robert Crandell got into a fight with AFA in mid 90s, he had AA back to full schedule in about 10 days after the strike began. At 10 days Clinton ended the strike, forced the AFA back to work and imposed a settlement. The back to work order was completed as AA suddenly didn't need to settle with AFA.

The AA strike plus a few others in the mid 90s lead to the CHAOS strike theory in the late 90s. CHAOS (Create Havoc Around Our System) involves the FA Union striking a particular section of the flight system, or a specific city or flight. The idea is to cripple the network, but not shut down the whole system. This was sucessfully utilized at Alaska and few others (UA pilots did something similar in 1999/2000).

In 1985 AC Flight attendants struck from June to early September. They were fully replaced by management and nonunion staff and had a good summer off their regular duties. The airline ran smoothly after the first week of disruption. In the end there are no customer service difference between strike or regular operations.
WR Cage is online now  
Old Sep 15, 11, 11:47 am
  #66  
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: YEG
Posts: 3,718
Originally Posted by YEG Guy View Post
Training a FA takes 5-7 days depending on how many a/c types Management would like each FA to fly. It can be done in 5 days if the FA groups are split amongst the major types (Embraer, Narrowbody Airbus, Widebody).

The 5-7 days training gets the basics of customer service plus all the safety training and safety exams completed.

Robert Crandell got into a fight with AFA in mid 90s, he had AA back to full schedule in about 10 days after the strike began. At 10 days Clinton ended the strike, forced the AFA back to work and imposed a settlement. The back to work order was completed as AA suddenly didn't need to settle with AFA.

The AA strike plus a few others in the mid 90s lead to the CHAOS strike theory in the late 90s. CHAOS (Create Havoc Around Our System) involves the FA Union striking a particular section of the flight system, or a specific city or flight. The idea is to cripple the network, but not shut down the whole system. This was sucessfully utilized at Alaska and few others (UA pilots did something similar in 1999/2000).

In 1985 AC Flight attendants struck from June to early September. They were fully replaced by management and nonunion staff and had a good summer off their regular duties. The airline ran smoothly after the first week of disruption. In the end there are no customer service difference between strike or regular operations.
Hope it goes that smooth!
hearna is offline  
Old Sep 15, 11, 12:00 pm
  #67  
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 55
Booked for YVR-PVG on Sep 23

Hello folks, Any idea how AC would re-route PVG bound passengers in case of any distruption to FLT AC 25?

Your feed back is much appreciated!

Black Hawk is offline  
Old Sep 15, 11, 12:50 pm
  #68  
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: YYC
Programs: AC SE100K, Hyatt Globalist
Posts: 4,033
Originally Posted by hearna View Post
Hope it goes that smooth!
The BA strikes over the past 2 years have provided a pile of documentation for airlines on how to handle a strike. BA ran a full LH schedule during the last strike and very close to a full SH one, and their network size is massive compared with AC.

What seemed to be the key driver of success was that management/ground crew loved the idea of being an FA for a while. They got to see cities around the world for free, but go back to their day jobs before it become monotonous. So they worked their tails off for the few weeks they flew. Additionally, pax were more willing to forgive the temporary crews when they made a mistake as it was well know that they were doing it for the first time.

The major difference I'm seeing so far (and its a biggie) is that BA came out well in advance and loudly said "WE WILL STILL FLY TO ALL DESTINATIONS, NO MATTER WHAT", which kept many of their passengers loyal and calm. AC on the other hand has merely said "We'll comment closer to the strike", and that's not good enough to convince people its safe to book with you, especially if they 'must' get to their destination.
rehoult is offline  
Old Sep 15, 11, 12:58 pm
  #69  
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Programs: Aeroplan Elite for life; Fairmont Platinum; Delta Platinum Plus
Posts: 267
A different kind of nervous flyer. I am holding full flex biz on Air France for the 22nd as back up for Yyz Cdg on AC. No Star Alliance Routing and try and find a J class ticket to Europe Wed, Thur, Fri of next week.
MQS007 is offline  
Old Sep 15, 11, 1:00 pm
  #70  
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Body in Downtown YYZ, heart and mind elsewhere
Programs: UA 50K, refugee from AC E50K.
Posts: 4,952
Originally Posted by rehoult View Post
The major difference I'm seeing so far (and its a biggie) is that BA came out well in advance and loudly said "WE WILL STILL FLY TO ALL DESTINATIONS, NO MATTER WHAT", which kept many of their passengers loyal and calm. AC on the other hand has merely said "We'll comment closer to the strike", and that's not good enough to convince people its safe to book with you, especially if they 'must' get to their destination.
I have an internal meeting where I need to fly folks in from across Canada to YYZ. I know they'll get here just fine on AC but I'm not sure if they'll get back on AC.

So we bought 30 round trip tickets on Westjet and Porter. Problem solved.
RCyyz is offline  
Old Sep 15, 11, 2:25 pm
  #71  
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Canada
Posts: 881
Originally Posted by rehoult View Post
The BA strikes over the past 2 years have provided a pile of documentation for airlines on how to handle a strike. BA ran a full LH schedule during the last strike and very close to a full SH one, and their network size is massive compared with AC.

What seemed to be the key driver of success was that management/ground crew loved the idea of being an FA for a while..
The BA situation was very different. BA's cabin crews are members of several different unions. Only one of the cabin crew unions within BA struck, and almost half the members of the striking union ignored the strike and showed up for work as normal.

100% of the FAs at AC are represented by one union, and I believe that 100% will strike if a strike is called. Given the damage that even a brief strike would cause to AC, and given the near certainty of back-to-work legislation being enacted, there's good reason for both sides to make a deal.
Spounce is offline  
Old Sep 15, 11, 3:41 pm
  #72  
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Canada
Programs: *G
Posts: 2,266
I keep reading posts doubting that replacement FAs could be trained in time, be they AC staff or others. I think it is a matter of public record that replacement workers are being/have been trained, resulting in CUPE lodging a complaint with the Labour Board. So that is clearly part of the plan.

Having said that, I agree with Spounce that a strike is unlikely or will be very short, particularly since Parliament resumes on Monday - very convenient.
fin 645 is offline  
Old Sep 15, 11, 3:50 pm
  #73  
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: PHL, NYC, DC
Posts: 9,473
train me train me.....i wanna wear high heels and be like a Pan Am stewardess :P
global happy traveller is offline  
Old Sep 15, 11, 4:20 pm
  #74  
Suspended
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 1,161
I like to think of this as a possibility that the Air Canada planes will be filled with slender beautiful 20something temps excited with the glamor of international travel.

One can dream.
tyberius is offline  
Old Sep 15, 11, 4:49 pm
  #75  
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: PHL, NYC, DC
Posts: 9,473
Originally Posted by tyberius View Post
I like to think of this as a possibility that the Air Canada planes will be filled with slender beautiful 20something temps excited with the glamor of international travel.

One can dream.
keep dreaming....... i'm on the same frequency now
global happy traveller is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread