Old Apr 15, 17, 11:25 am
  #5781  
Rdenney
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Nawthun Virginia
Programs: Air: UA (Gold), AA, WN, DL; Hotel: Hilton (Diamond), plus all the rest
Posts: 135
Originally Posted by MSPeconomist View Post
I highly doubt that UA was making decisions based on the "greater good."

Instead, UA should have been making decisions to maximize shareholder value.
Right.

Given:

1. A passenger had offered to volunteer at $1600 in vouchers, and

2. Objectives are departing on time, with prize crew on board, maximizing customer satisfaction, and minimizing costs,

the forced removal of a legitimately seated passenger was the worst choice. A police action presented the highest probability to delay the flight, upset the customers, and risk an ugly and expensive public confrontation.

And the best choice had already presented itself. When Dr. Dao had refused, the GA could have very easily withdrawn to discuss with bosses, who should be equipped to override procedure for the greatest good. The "greatest good" was absolutely to accept the $1600 offer, although most of us believe it would have taken less to find all four volunteers.
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