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Old Sep 2, 09, 1:13 pm
  #34  
Benjh
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Paris
Posts: 1,231
Smile "The Flyertalk Movie" is coming! More info here!

"The story of a man ready to make a connection".

"Ryan's one real emotional investment is in his mastery of business travel. His goal is to reach that elite echelon of travellers who have achieved the ten-million-mile mark."



Yes, FTers, we're getting closer to the release date for the movie (December 4th in the US mid january in Europe), and I suspect the marketing campaign from the folks at Paramount is gonna kick off soon.

The tagline and poster are out, check this out:
http://www.imdb.com/media/rm3081734400/tt1193138

I suggest this thread becomes the FT community official watch over the movie, and what it means for us. No doubt, frequent flyers will be heavily talked about, since this is a big release, with a big name attached to it.

Will we discover that "The Clooney" had been lurking among us for the past 2 years, in order to do some research? How accurate will be "Up in the air" and will there be many private jokes for our exclusive enjoyment?

The movie is already much talked about in the cinephile circles, and is even gathering some buzz for the oscars:
http://www.thefilmexperience.net/Awa...9/picture.html

The trailer is slated to debut on September 10th, and the film will premiere at the famed Toronto Film Festival on September 16th.
I will do my best to update this thread when the first reviews are posted.

In the meantime, here is the "pitch" from the Toronto festival webpage.

"Fans of Jason Reitman's previous two features, Thank You for Smoking and Juno, will be both surprised and reassured by Up in the Air. When the film begins, it seems as if Reitman has merged the business world of Smoking with some of the warmer values in Juno, but within moments it becomes clear that he has sharpened his pen and delved into even more complex and timely psycho-social territory, bound to hit audiences right in the gut.

Based on the novel by Walter Kirn (who also wrote Thumbsucker), Up in the Air offers darkly humorous insights into corporate America and male mid-life crisis. Ryan Bingham (George Clooney) is a “career transition consultant” – essentially someone who fires people for a living. Hired by downsizing firms to make the personal, well, impersonal, Ryan, in his perfectly tailored suits and professionally remote manner, aces the task. Ryan's one real emotional investment is in his mastery of business travel. His goal is to reach that elite echelon of travellers who have achieved the ten-million-mile mark.

One day Ryan's boss, Craig Gregory (Jason Bateman), introduces him to their newest colleague, the aptly named Natalie Keener (Anna Kendrick), who wants to revolutionize the transition industry by using video conferencing out of corporate headquarters. Ryan is horrified, not only because this signals a trivialization of his skills, but also because his travel will stop. He offers to take Natalie on a road trip to show her how to “transition” face to face. As he mentors his new co-worker, he simultaneously juggles rendezvouses with Alex (Vera Farmiga), another business traveller who can match him club card for club card. What begins as a series of hotel hookups with Alex soon develops into something approaching a real relationship, and these emotional stirrings prompt Ryan to view the subjects of his firings in a new light.

While smart, sexy and very funny, Reitman's film is so exquisitely timed, so filled with multi-faceted characters and plot twists, that it perfectly captures the zeitgeist of America's current social and economic turmoil. Clooney's performance exploits his deft comic skills but allows us a peek at the haunted poignancy of a man searching for a soul that he hopes is still there.

Jane Schoettle "


Here is the official imdb thread:
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1193138/

What do you guys think? Seems like the airline will be fictitious, and that we're in for some fun. Personally, I can't wait!

More soon, I hope.
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