0 min left

Tripdelta Claims to Save You up to 80% on Airfare Through “Hidden” Routing

Pretty young female tourist with backpack using digital tablet, portrait with blue sky

New website uses artificial intelligence to help travelers fly more cheaply through alternate airports and itineraries.

A new booking website built in Germany claims to help travelers fly for cheaper using a proprietary artificial intelligence algorithm to put together unique itineraries for travelers. Called Tripdelta, the new website helps travelers save money through searching for flights along several factors, then sewing them together as a complete itinerary.

Much like traditional flight booking websites, travelers looking for fares through Tripdelta input their point of origin, destination and planned travel dates. From there, engineers behind the project say the website’s AI program performs over 40 searches, which include alternate airports and “hidden” routing. As a result, the Tripdelta team claims flyers can save over 80 percent over traditional airfares.

“It bothered us how many searches we had to do to find our flights,” the programmers wrote on the website. “We studied flight search inside and out and discovered tricks that can save a lot of money. Unfortunately, these tricks also take a lot of time.”

Although the prices may be cheaper, travelers may be required to do extra work to actualize those savings. In one search on a domestic flight, Tripdelta recommended lower fares at an airport over 60 miles away. In another search on an international fare, the website offered two separate one-way itineraries, which combined were $10 more than a fare found on a similar website.

Additionally, while Tripdelta may help travelers discover money-saving airfare combinations, the site itself does not sell the tickets. Rather, the website will direct travelers to websites where they can purchase the separate one-way segments or the entire itinerary.

Speaking to Tech Insider, a spokesperson for Tripdelta claims over 100,000 people have used their website to book airfares. While not all the fares are cheaper or more convenient, those behind the site say they offer flyers all options to decide which itinerary works best for them.

[Photo: Getty Images]

Comments are Closed.
4 Comments
E
emkn45 January 14, 2016

I agree with the comments from sdsearch. Also, I don't see where it has flexible date options (e.g. +/- 3 days, upcoming weekends, etc) like Kayak does, so this gives Kayak a leg up. Their "Weekend Trip" plug-in for Chrome is fun and flashy, but not all that useful. You can't customize it to say Show me only flights leaving after 12pm on Friday, or Only show me flights <$400.

S
senjoim January 14, 2016

Ran a few tests and it shows me nothing more than what ITA Matrix displays. Next.

S
sdsearch January 13, 2016

First, it won't let you search any cabin other than economy. Second, other than showing Southwest flights, it doesn't seem to return results much different than Kayak, in that the cheapest flights are on ULCCs like Spirit, Frontier, and Sun, which get their low prices in part by charging for things that other airlines don't charge for (but that isn't included in what Tripdelta returns as the price), and can take a dozen or more hours longer than normal! For anyone who doesn't want to fly ULCCs, and doesn't want to add 12 hours to a 4 hour flight, it doesn't seem to do much more than other flight search sites. And the user interface is clunkier than Kayak's since you can't select one airline only with a single click, you have to first deselect all, and then select the one want. And I think I see how it comes up with the deceptive claim of "up to 80%" savings. It shows you the quickest flight, which might be a nearly-sold-out nonstop, and thus has a high ticket price by now, and then shows you the ULCC flights with horribly long connections. So it simply seems to mean that it saves you up to 80% off of last-minute fares, not 80% off of deep discount advance fares. Whoop-de-doo!

January 13, 2016

Another Skiplagged lawsuit in the making?