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Incidents

Racist Text Messages Boot Passenger From Flight

Racist Text Messages Boot Passenger From Flight
Ryan Boyd

On a recent Kulula flight from O. R. Tambo International Airport (JNB) to King Shaka International Airport (DUR), a passenger was asked to deplane after her fellow passenger, reverend Solumuzi Mabuza, noticed that she had referred to the flight’s passenger using the k-word, a slur considered analogous to the n-word.

“I told her that I saw what she sent to her man but she refused to delete it and I came to the conclusion that this child was taught this behaviour at home. I want her to be taught that in this country it is illegal to be racist,” said Mabuza.

“Our flight might be 10 minutes late‚ but as South Africans we can’t allow this type of behaviour to continue.”

To read more on this story, go to Sunday Times.

[Photo: Shutterstock]

View Comments (11)

11 Comments

  1. Boogie711

    June 22, 2018 at 2:33 pm

    For those who are not South African… the article refers to the ‘K’ word. I admit – I had no idea what it was.

    A quick check of Wikipedia says ‘the k word’ (you can look up the specific word yourself, if you care to) has roughly the same pejorative impact as the “N” word does in North America…. to the point where even using it is illegal in South Africa.

    It was a term I had (thankfully) not run across before.

  2. NW.BTR.Than.The.Rest

    June 23, 2018 at 7:12 am

    1984

  3. sam737

    June 24, 2018 at 4:36 am

    The K-word may be (and i think it is ) awful.
    However. What is illegal in fact is the use of this word to intentionally injury someone. So the context matters greatly. There is no way it may be prosecutable by the mere use it in a private chat.
    The reverend had apparently been spying into the private conversation, and his demand of deleting the work from the private chat is ridiculous.
    The whole story is based on unlawful access to someone private chat, and this is nonsense.

  4. kvom

    June 24, 2018 at 8:54 am

    I knew about the word as the colonial British used it in Africa and India to refer to the natives. I wasn’t aware that it is as pejorative as the n-word.

  5. strickerj

    June 24, 2018 at 10:02 am

    I know it’s a different culture and laws, but it seems a bit extreme to boot someone over a text message they sent (that no one would have even known about if the complainant hadn’t been looking over her shoulder). I find the notion that “racism is illegal in this country” a bit troubling – how would that be enforced without instituting a police state?

  6. The_Bouncer

    June 24, 2018 at 2:02 pm

    I have spent a good deal of time in South Africa and know the word referred to. The comparison to the N-word is a fair one – both words carry a similar meaning and a similar degree of offence. It is not an acceptable word to use, at any time or in any context.

  7. Transpacificflyer

    June 24, 2018 at 2:15 pm

    And apparently, the “Reverend” believes it is acceptable to read other people’s private messages. The other person did not force the “Reverend” to read her phone, and she obviously had an expectation of privacy when she was texting. He was obviously invading her personal space and privacy. The fact that she may have used an inappropriate word, but this man did something far worse which was to stick his nose into someone else’s personal affairs. The message given is that spying on others is acceptable in South Africa. The information that the “Reverend” obtained was done through an unethical and probably illegal act. Apparently, the “Reverend” is not one for ethics.

  8. DutchessPDX

    June 25, 2018 at 3:03 pm

    All these racist apologist in the comments. Big Brother, and accusing the passenger of snooping. Having a conversation open and visible on your mobile phone is tantamount to having this conversation in public. You have very little expectation of privacy if you’re having this conversation in close proximity to others.

    I feel people like you who may not be racist but make excuses for people that make racist comments, are just as culpable as those making the remarks. People like you enable this kind of behavior and your just as guilty and just as ugly. You should be ashamed.

  9. secondsoprano

    June 25, 2018 at 10:48 pm

    Absolutely agree Dutchess

  10. ashkale

    June 25, 2018 at 11:23 pm

    Well Said DutchessPDX.

  11. kdjk5467

    June 27, 2018 at 2:15 pm

    ” I want her to be taught that in this country it is illegal to be racist”…. What does that even mean?
    Also, gross!
    I would not be friends with a racist and I would let anyone I was with that I disagree with that garbage, but it sickens me to think of the government trying to fix that with thought police.

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