Hurricane Sandy Threatens Eastern United States and Canada

This is the projected path of Hurricane Sandy, already a strong Category 2 hurricane with sustained winds of 105 miles per hour. Weather map courtesy of The Weather Channel.

If you are planning to travel to or be in the eastern United States and Canada within the next few days, you may want to consider changing your plans as Hurricane Sandy is directly impacting the Bahamas, which is currently under a hurricane warning. The entire east coast of the state of Florida is currently on alert with a tropical storm warning from Miami to Daytona Beach and tropical storm watches for the remainder of the east coast of Florida.

A tropical storm warning means that residents will most likely experience tropical storm conditions within the next 36 hours, including heavy rain, intense winds, high surf, strong rip currents, and possible flooding.

Although the storm is expected to weaken, Hurricane Sandy — which is currently a Category 2 hurricane with sustained winds of 105 miles per hour and moving north at 20 miles per hour — is forecast to expand and become larger through Tuesday, when it is expected to directly impact the northeastern United States with its unusual projected track. Cities in areas from North Carolina all the way to Nova Scotia — including Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, New York, Boston and Halifax — are expected to be affected even though they may not be directly impacted. Hurricane Irene was merely a tropical storm when it made landfall in New York City last year, but Irene was still responsible for widespread damage which affected many people, including FlyerTalk member Ceiba.

There is currently one discussion on FlyerTalk dedicated to Hurricane Sandy. Expect additional discussions to appear over the next several days.

Added as of Friday, October 26, 2012:

Here is an updated list of the discussions on FlyerTalk pertaining to Hurricane Sandy which — despite its eventual weakening, in a confluence with both a winter storm heading east and a cold blast of air from the north — is predicted to create a historic meteorological event that could exceed one billion dollars in damage:

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