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Old Sep 2, 11, 5:36 pm   #1
 
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Anyone Ever Get Turned Down for Global Entry?

I recently got Global Entry. I assume all they did was a criminal/customs check, and I was accepted.

The website says that Global Entry is for "pre-approved low risk travelers". Does that mean that anyone without a criminal record/customs violation record is "low-risk"?

Anyone aware of any specific instances of a denied application? If so, what was the (apparent) reason for the denial?
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Old Sep 2, 11, 10:30 pm   #2
Ari
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Originally Posted by BigFlyer View Post
The website says that Global Entry is for "pre-approved low risk travelers". Does that mean that anyone without a criminal record/customs violation record is "low-risk"?
No. If you have ties to a 'scary' country (think Arab, Muslim, etc), then you might be turned down even with no criminal record. There was a story somewhere of a Pakistani national LPR who had trouble, I believe.
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Old Sep 3, 11, 12:31 pm   #3
 
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No. If you have ties to a 'scary' country (think Arab, Muslim, etc), then you might be turned down even with no criminal record. There was a story somewhere of a Pakistani national LPR who had trouble, I believe.
I lived in Saudi Arabia for 3 years as a teenager (oil brat) & had no problems getting approved. In fact, I don't think the topic even came up during my interview.
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Old Sep 3, 11, 8:51 pm   #4
 
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Originally Posted by BigFlyer View Post
I recently got Global Entry. I assume all they did was a criminal/customs check, and I was accepted.

The website says that Global Entry is for "pre-approved low risk travelers". Does that mean that anyone without a criminal record/customs violation record is "low-risk"?

Anyone aware of any specific instances of a denied application? If so, what was the (apparent) reason for the denial?
Yes. Do a search in the forum. Various convictions within 10 years will result in a denial.
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Old Sep 13, 11, 12:19 am   #5
 
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A work colleague of mine applied for SENTRI a year or two ago. At his interview he was told he would be denied because 2 years earlier his wife had been arrested with a van load of illegal aliens at the San Ysidro Border crossing. He was utterly dumbfounded by that information and argued it was incorrect. Problem is, it was correct. Apparently in-laws bailed his wife out of jail, and while living in the same house as one big happy family, she went through court, got probation, paid fines and so on and so forth while completely concealing the arrest and the entire incident from her husband until it came up in HIS SENTRI interview. He has never had the slightest legal trouble in his life but was in fact formally denied based on his wifes shenanigans that he wasn't even aware of.
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Old Sep 13, 11, 12:02 pm   #6
 
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You gotta make sure you know who you're married too!
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Old Sep 13, 11, 2:47 pm   #7
 
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Originally Posted by Mabuk dan gila View Post
Problem is, it was correct. Apparently in-laws bailed his wife out of jail, and while living in the same house as one big happy family, she went through court, got probation, paid fines and so on and so forth while completely concealing the arrest and the entire incident from her husband until it came up in HIS SENTRI interview.
That must have been one awkward dinner conversation that night...
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Old Sep 13, 11, 5:47 pm   #8
 
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I recently did the NEXUS online application and face-to-face interview with both U.S. & Canadian officials at YVR while on a trip up there last Thursday and the NEXUS card was in today's mail.

Getting a NEXUS card should not be a real issue as long as you have no criminal history and that sort of thing.

Since I have not worked in quite a few years, the Canadian official was concerned with how I support myself. Thankfully, I just happened to have some of my quarterly statements with me. After she scanned over them, especially the "bottom line" her concerns about my wanting to work in Canada were put to rest.

Oddly enough, going through U.S. Immigrations at YVR on my way home to LAS, the immigrations officer wanted to know what I did for a living. My reply was that I am "gainfully unemployed". That was a first for me in all the times crossing international borders over the years.

Is having a job a requirement to travel from and back to the U.S. these days?

My reason for the card is quick immigrations for my frequent trips to Canada to see my significant other and maybe in time to buy a seasonal apartment to escape the hot summers here.
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Old Sep 13, 11, 7:21 pm   #9
 
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Originally Posted by usafwso View Post
Oddly enough, going through U.S. Immigrations at YVR on my way home to LAS, the immigrations officer wanted to know what I did for a living. My reply was that I am "gainfully unemployed". That was a first for me in all the times crossing international borders over the years.

Is having a job a requirement to travel from and back to the U.S. these days?
No. But the officers frequently ask your profession as a way of evaluating your reaction and body language. (If you had something to hide, you might hesitate, and if you were making it up, you might not be able to give details such as the name/address of your employer.)

As a US Citizen, you can choose to remain silent as long as you present acceptable, legitimate proof of identity and citizenship, and as long as you complete a written declaration (or use an entry kiosk successfully). Of course, if you refuse to cooperate with questioning, the officers can choose to detain you for a very thorough search of your belongings and person, with no warrant needed.


Quote:
My reason for the card is quick immigrations for my frequent trips to Canada to see my significant other and maybe in time to buy a seasonal apartment to escape the hot summers here.

Just a suggestion: don't advertise the bit about the significant other. Canada really doesn't like it when Americans go there to visit girlfriends and such, because they assume you will want to stay and get a job so you can be with the girlfriend. I find that they often ask "who are you meeting in Canada?" or "who do you know here?"

So, don't volunteer that part. Of course, if they ask you directly, tell the truth, but do so using as few words as possible. (Anything you say to a LEO can be used against you in legal proceedings.)
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Old Sep 14, 11, 12:14 am   #10
 
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[quote=ESpen36;17104580]

Just a suggestion: don't advertise the bit about the significant other. Canada really doesn't like it when Americans go there to visit girlfriends and such, because they assume you will want to stay and get a job so you can be with the girlfriend. I find that they often ask "who are you meeting in Canada?" or "who do you know here?"[quote]

Does anyone else find the above an absolutely outrageous statement to make? Border agents are professional and the post implies otherwise. Part of me wants to report this post to a moderator.
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Old Sep 14, 11, 4:15 am   #11
 
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[quote=ESpen36]Just a suggestion: don't advertise the bit about the significant other. Canada really doesn't like it when Americans go there to visit girlfriends and such, because they assume you will want to stay and get a job so you can be with the girlfriend. I find that they often ask "who are you meeting in Canada?" or "who do you know here?"[quote]

Quote:
Originally Posted by mileena View Post
Does anyone else find the above an absolutely outrageous statement to make? Border agents are professional and the post implies otherwise. Part of me wants to report this post to a moderator.
Nope, not outrageous because it's completely true. And US immigration is the same, they often turn down tourist visa applications if you have any ties to the US (such as a girlfriend/boyfriend/spouse etc). And frankly, it's probably reasonable to assume that a good percentage of people in that situation will overstay or cheat the system.

To make a blanket comment like "Border agents are professional and the post implies otherwise" is the outrageous (and/or naive) statement here.
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Old Sep 14, 11, 10:48 am   #12
 
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Originally Posted by mileena View Post
Does anyone else find the above an absolutely outrageous statement to make? Border agents are professional and the post implies otherwise. Part of me wants to report this post to a moderator.
Nope, not at all. I personally know a married Canadian-American gay couple that has to be very cautious every time they cross the border (to the extent sometimes one will fly and one will drive) so as not to raise any suspicions among Immigration officials.

The American columnist Dan Savage, who's married(?) to a Canadian, has also written about his experiences with Immigration officials on both sides of the border.

And don't take my two examples to imply that only gay couples have difficulties...it's a well-documented fact among hetero couples, too.
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Old Sep 14, 11, 11:50 am   #13
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[quote=mileena;17105821][quote=ESpen36;17104580]

Just a suggestion: don't advertise the bit about the significant other. Canada really doesn't like it when Americans go there to visit girlfriends and such, because they assume you will want to stay and get a job so you can be with the girlfriend. I find that they often ask "who are you meeting in Canada?" or "who do you know here?"
Quote:

Does anyone else find the above an absolutely outrageous statement to make? Border agents are professional and the post implies otherwise. Part of me wants to report this post to a moderator.
?? I see absolutely nothing in the post that reflects on border patrol agent professionalism.

These are standard questions and border patrol is quite open (unlike TSA) about why they ask them. People do overstay visas, and one motivator is a significant other on the other side of the border.
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Old Sep 14, 11, 12:03 pm   #14
 
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Originally Posted by mileena View Post
Does anyone else find the above an absolutely outrageous statement to make? Border agents are professional and the post implies otherwise. Part of me wants to report this post to a moderator.


There are any number of threads here exactly about that topic. Do you want to report those threads as well?

I realise that you don't fly, but that is something which does happen, and has nothing to do with 'unprofessional' behaviour.

Canadian Girlfriend got seriously hassled before entering US this time

Unpleasant Experience Entering U.S. for Young Relative - Any suggestions?

Will UK Immigration give me a hard time?
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Old Oct 2, 11, 1:15 pm   #15
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[quote=mileena;17105821][quote=ESpen36;17104580]

Just a suggestion: don't advertise the bit about the significant other. Canada really doesn't like it when Americans go there to visit girlfriends and such, because they assume you will want to stay and get a job so you can be with the girlfriend. I find that they often ask "who are you meeting in Canada?" or "who do you know here?"
Quote:

Does anyone else find the above an absolutely outrageous statement to make? Border agents are professional and the post implies otherwise. Part of me wants to report this post to a moderator.
Of course, you're welcome to report it to a moderator, but I doubt that the moderator or most readers would find it outrageous or that it implies that border agents are unprofessional.
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