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-   -   Do you cook at the hotel? What do you make? (http://www.flyertalk.com/forum/travelbuzz/855794-do-you-cook-hotel-what-do-you-make.html)

Non-NonRev Aug 16, 08 8:25 am

IKEA meatballs - yummm! :)

Kimberley Aug 16, 08 12:18 pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by Non-NonRev (Post 10211308)
IKEA meatballs - yummm! :)

IKEA? As in the flat pack furniture people? :confused:

Dudleydog73 Aug 16, 08 3:28 pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kimberley (Post 10212208)
IKEA? As in the flat pack furniture people? :confused:

EXACTLY! The inhouse restaurant sells swedish meatballs (and also has to go frozen models)

--DD73

Cloudship Aug 16, 08 6:42 pm

I sometimes have purposely stayed at some of the suite hotels in order to get a kitchen so I can do a little cooking while traveling. Unfortunately most of the time you only get the microwave, a small sink, and sometimes a (lousy) cooktop. So I usually end up eating out most.

However, on a trip to London I stayed at one of the apartment hotels. It had a full kitchen, and I took the opportunity to go out shopping and cook in the room. That was great - so many new things to try! Grocery Markets are one of the true undiscovered tourist destinations - you can learn more about a place by seeing where people shop for their every day needs. Ever been to a grocery store in Paris? They actually sell frozen meals and lots of prepackaged cheese - including many that I can find in stores here!

But have you ever tried cooking a Thanksgiving Dinner at a hotel? Several years ago my brother was in a bad hiking accident, and me and my parents had flown out to be there. We stayed a few weeks, and so stayed at a Townplace Suites. This was over Thanksgiving, and so we decided to cheer my brother up by having Thanksgiving dinner in his hospital room. The vegetables and other stuff went fine, even though it was little tricky doing it all on two burners and with limited cookware. But the turkey kept setting off the smoke alarm in the hotel, and so we had to come up with another option for that. So my father, who unsurprisingly made friends with the cooking staff at the hospital cafeteria, brought it to them and they were nice enough to cook it in their oven.Now THAT is a thanksgiving to remember!

falconea Aug 16, 08 10:56 pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cloudship (Post 10213480)
Ever been to a grocery store in Paris? They actually sell frozen meals and lots of prepackaged cheese - including many that I can find in stores here!

Anywhere in the world that I go I always go and look at the local grocery stores/supermarkets/street markets. It's always so interesting!

Paul Bocuse makes frozen dinners which can be found in Paris!

Audrey

bzbdewd Aug 17, 08 2:32 pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dudleydog73 (Post 10212828)
EXACTLY! The inhouse restaurant sells swedish meatballs (and also has to go frozen models)

--DD73

I love Ikea meatballs! I didn't know they had them frozen too!

linsj Aug 17, 08 3:58 pm

I like to buy salad ingredients and top them with tuna. Sandwich fixings are also easy. I've seen a lot more packaged microwave entrees at the grocery store, but I prefer to buy deli items.

Restaurant meals generally equal 2-3 meals for me, so I take leftovers to microwave.

florin Aug 18, 08 12:56 am

I've stayed at long-term hotels (Marriott Residence Inn) for literally years. I really enjoy cooking at home, but at hotels... not so much. The right tools make a HUGE difference (good knives, good pans, etc), as do the right spices.

At a hotel I kept things fairly simple: stirfry's, grilled veggies, quesadillas, salads, salmon. I suppose pasta is always an option but I stay away from pasta sauce in a can/jar - it's too easy to make at home, although it does require spices/tools.

marais Aug 19, 08 5:01 pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by chococat (Post 10207063)
Back in college days when I was staying at dive motels, I would occasionally make a grilled cheese sandwich on the hotel iron. Not bad really.

OMG...perfect. In fact, if you're in a hotel room sans microwave or fridge, and if you check luggage with space for coldpacks, this might work:
  1. Pack a sufficient number of flat aluminum foil sheets (or a roll of foil if you wanna). Pack slices of white bread in a plastic bag (don't worry if they get squished, they will anyway in the sandwich).
  2. Between two frozen coldpacks, pack individually-wrapped slices of American cheese, those little individual mini-tubs of butter (not the paper-wrapped pats) and anything perishable you want to include in your sandwich: thin-sliced ham, red pepper, onion, whatevah. Roll the whole thing in an absorbent towel to catch the condensation in transit.
  3. At your destination, assemble your masterpiece with the bread, cheese, butter and fixins. Wrap carefully in the foil, no gaps.
  4. Set up your in-room ironing board and set your iron to the highest setting, no steam. Place a room towel on your ironing board (for Pete's sake, I gotta iron my shirt on that board after you leave).
  5. Place sandwich on protected board, set iron on top. When you smell something cooking/burning, flip sandwich and replace iron until the cooked/burned smell tells you your creation is done.

I perfected this technique in a dorm room in college, and though I don't use it much these days, it's good to pass along the knowledge :D And foil-wrapped pressing really does work for small flat filets of fish as well, if you find those fresh where you're going.

Just don't forget that protective towel on the ironing board :D

bzbdewd Aug 19, 08 5:58 pm

Excellent instructions! I can't wait to try it! (I promise to remember the towel) :D

gardkarlsen Aug 21, 08 3:03 am

Hi

I cook alot when I'm home. But when I'm traveling on vacation I like to relax and I prefer to eat out...and to try the local cuisine :-)

bzbdewd Sep 16, 08 11:12 am

Quote:

Originally Posted by gardkarlsen (Post 10236210)
Hi

I cook alot when I'm home. But when I'm traveling on vacation I like to relax and I prefer to eat out...and to try the local cuisine :-)

We did for the first year... and 40+lbs :rolleyes: This year we're trying to be a little better... but I still loose my initiative when the facilities are really limited. We do business travel and are rarely home so it's a bit different then leisure travel. However - if we were just going to some place for a few days for fun I would definitely want to eat local cuisine.

Mendobrew Sep 16, 08 11:30 am

+1 on Weight Watchers meals, add some salad in a bag with fat free dressing and a Skinny Cow for dessert and I can drop a few pounds a week.

If I really feel motivated to “cook”, I will make a “Turkey Dip”, 4-5oz sliced low fat turkey breast on a sandwich roll with a cup of hot fat free chicken stock to dip it in… hey, works for me.:D

365RoadWarrior Sep 17, 08 5:13 pm

Rice and beans. Or, sometimes, beans and rice. ...lentils and quinoa or bulgur or other grains... (Hey, I'm vegetarian.)

I've even been known to produce 'dinner' with an immersion heater or - if the beans are already partially cooked - a coffee pot. (Mainly, this is for the Third World situation, where vegetarian food isn't readily available.)

Redhead Sep 17, 08 6:29 pm

Not the healthiest but yummy - baked potato with baked beans and cheese. Bake the potato in the micro for about 4 minutes. Slice open and squueze to make a pocket. Cover with a small can of baked beans and shredded cheese, zap for another 1-2 minutes

Instant oatmeal in the coffee pot - a college staple

salad is always a good option


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