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Old Apr 14, 06, 2:39 am   #1
 
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Last edited by Kate_Canuck; Apr 17, 06 at 2:58 am.
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Old Apr 14, 06, 8:52 am   #2
 
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I don't know of any specific sites but I do know that any form of cancer gives an increased risk of developing DVT (deep vein thrombosis). Late stage lung cancer implies that the person already has breathing impairment and probably increases the risk of DVT without doing anything else. Add that to a long flight, dehydration, cramped seats, immobility and any other medical risk factors and you could be in real trouble. Even premium economy or business class are still cramped seats when you are in them for 15 hours with compromised health. No matter what you find on the web a 15 hour flight with a diagnosis of lung cancer needs to be completely cleared by an onocologist.
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Old Apr 14, 06, 9:19 am   #3
 
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impressed

Impressed with the courage and attitude your relative shows.

Suggest an exact-phrase google search on travel with cancer

That brings up useful advice such as:

http://www.cancerbackup.org.uk/Resou...lissues/Travel

http://www.masta.org/travel-health-l...article_id=124

Such references echo the advice to work things out thoroughly with the attending physician in advance, among numerous suggestions for safety and comfort.

All the best to you and yours.
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Old Apr 14, 06, 9:40 am   #4
 
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Thanks, Zeppox, for those links. I guess my research skills are a bit compromised today. That's exactly the kind of information I was looking for.
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Old Apr 14, 06, 3:04 pm   #5
 
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I can't speak to the risks (and I know that's the question), but we just went through this ourselves 6 months ago, with an 8 hour flight for a relative who had previously suffered a stroke and was undergoing chemotherapy for lung cancer. I think that the best thing we did is put him into business class to make the trip much more comfortable, and he didn't seem to have any particular problem come up as a result of the flight. All the best in this difficult time.
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Old Apr 14, 06, 6:25 pm   #6
 
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15 hrs is difficult for anyone. Maybe the flight could be in two stages with a few days rest at a hotel before the next flight? If the first flight is really too problematic the person would also be closer to home. Could you bring along a nurse? a relative with medical training?
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Old Apr 15, 06, 9:05 am   #7
 
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Both my parents died of lung cancer, and both were travelers. From what I remember, both felt well enough to travel BEFORE treatment started. And their drs did not discourage it, but did warn each that they might not feel like doing much. Stamina was a bit low, but travel itself was not a problem. As with any lung disorder, they will likely be limited in how much walking or touring they feel like doing once they arrive....but every case is different. And it is a wise idea to have an oncologist, or GP, you can contact in Paris, if need be.

If your family member is undergoing chemo, it's a totally different matter. Once treatment starts, it will be difficult to find a window during which they feel like traveling, or blood counts permit.

Once they complete treatment, it may take a while for energy to be restored to the point where they feel like embarking on a long trip, be it in a car, or on a plane.
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Old Apr 15, 06, 4:35 pm   #8
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Kudos to the relative for wanting to travel before the situation worsens. But - definitely get the doc's approval.

And really, unless the relative is superwomen/man, I think it's going to be difficult - my aunt has been given 4-6weeks to live (3-6mths w/ chemo) due to lung cancer. Walking tires her out due to reduced lung capacity. She can't climb stairs. She tires really easily and needs naps. Not to mention breathing can be problematic. And w/ chemo she's wide open to catching anything anyone has, not to mention she feels like crap after it.

If your relative does fly & is under chemo, then wear a mask on the plane. Obviously planes have oxygen masks/tanks, but if something happened once they were PONR on plane, that could be problematic. My father died of lung cancer, and in late stage he couldn't have really traveled.

Also, the relative is going to need some serious recovery time upon landing.

Having said all that, if the doc oks it, hope the trip goes well. Good luck to you & your family.

Cheers.
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Old Apr 16, 06, 8:09 am   #9
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I am going to move this to Travel Buzz.
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Old Apr 16, 06, 10:42 am   #10
 
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There may not be any absolute medical reason why your relos wouldn't be able to fly. My worry would be, though, about what might happen if they got sick while in Paris -- would they have insurance to pay medical bills, would they be able to get back home at all etc? The travel insurance will need to be watertight, and may cost a bit. The cancerbacup site has some (UK-centric) info on this.

Good luck in planning it, though -- hope it works out.
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Old Apr 16, 06, 12:57 pm   #11
 
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Insurance

I would reiterate the advice to check on insurance.

I've heard of several people who have wanted to do final foreign trips yet have been unable to do so because they can't get insurance and justdon't want to risk putting their family into a financial black hole if anything were to go wrong.

Good Luck
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Old Apr 16, 06, 3:18 pm   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kettering Northants QC
I would reiterate the advice to check on insurance.

I've heard of several people who have wanted to do final foreign trips yet have been unable to do so because they can't get insurance and justdon't want to risk putting their family into a financial black hole if anything were to go wrong.

Good Luck
Agreed, I'm in this situation right now and we have decided it is too much of a risk as travel insurance has been refused. EU countries were an option for us as there is reciprocal free healthcare for UK citizens (but only emergency treatment, not repatriation costs). So we have decided to stay in the UK.
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Old Apr 16, 06, 9:07 pm   #13
 
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Why are you asking a bunch of strangers instead of a physician who is familiar with both your relative and his/her cancer?
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Old Apr 16, 06, 9:34 pm   #14
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SlickRick
Why are you asking a bunch of strangers instead of a physician who is familiar with both your relative and his/her cancer?
I'm sure OP always intended to have a check w/ Doc. I think the OP figured at least some people on the board would have experience w/ the situation. While they may not be able to provide medical advice, posters can give insight into the airline side (e.g. are the GA's helpful in pre-boarding, what do you have to do to get the O2 tanks for on-board use, etc.)-these kinds of things the Doc probably wouldn't know as much about.
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Old Apr 16, 06, 10:14 pm   #15
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Yeah, go talk to the doctor.

But if I had late stage lung cancer, and I had the time and money, and I wanted to go to Paris; hell like I'd care what my doctor said. I would be getting on the plane. If I died on the flight, so be it. And I would make sure they don't resusitate, and I would leave enough money for others to take care of the "business".
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