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Old Feb 21, 06, 2:43 am   #1
 
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Question 802.11G and 802.11B x2 @home possible?

So my current old netgear router at home is 802.11B, but I have a mix of 802.11B/G capable machines at home. Can I buy another 802.11G wireless router and put it down right next to the 802.11B wireless router without worrying about interference etc?

One device would be directly connected to the broadband modem. The other would just hang off the first device's switch port.
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Old Feb 21, 06, 5:09 am   #2
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Set your new router to "G" only, and pick a different channel than the one that the "B" router is operating on. They co-exist. The setting are all in the config panel.

Since all new routers will do B/G, why are you keeping the old one around?
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Old Feb 21, 06, 5:45 am   #3
 
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You wouldn't want two routers. You'd want to get a G access point and hang THAT off the B router. Cheaper and won't have as many config hurdles.

Now, why are you doing that??? The G routers that are out there can do B/G. You'd simply replace the B router with the G. Otherwise you end up with needless complexity that gives you zero extra functionality beyond getting 802.11G
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Old Feb 21, 06, 6:45 am   #4
 
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there is the point that the B availability will impact the G performance, so being able to segregate the G router for G products only, will allow the B products to function normally and not impact the G performance. Now, I think this is only when B products are actively accessing the G/B router, and not just when the switch is thrown.

you also wouldn't want to have both setup as DHCP, on the same network.
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Old Feb 21, 06, 11:07 am   #5
 
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I was under the impression that a B/G router running 10/100 wireless effectively becomes a B access point whenever a 802.11B device is accessing it.

So to get better performance, I wanted to have two different access points.

Is this correct? Or do the latest 802.11B/G routers do both with no slowdown?
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Old Feb 21, 06, 11:27 am   #6
 
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correct, I tried to detail that in my post but the meaning seems to have been lost. you will have the best performace for B/G environments with a G router and a B access point. I say the later, since it would be best for ONE to be the router and another to be setup as an AP only, I would rec'd the B one. Thereby the G performance will never be affected.
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Old Feb 21, 06, 7:03 pm   #7
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chichow
I was under the impression that a B/G router running 10/100 wireless effectively becomes a B access point whenever a 802.11B device is accessing it.

So to get better performance, I wanted to have two different access points.

Is this correct? Or do the latest 802.11B/G routers do both with no slowdown?
I just bought a g Linksys router and the g devices seem to be connecting at g speeds while the b devices are connecting at b speeds.
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Old Feb 23, 06, 2:39 pm   #8
 
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Ok so I just ordered the

Linksys Compact Wireless-G Broadband Router WRT54GC

I'll report back on whether or not it can split B/G without affecting performance.

Alect: how are you measuring?
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Old Feb 23, 06, 5:02 pm   #9
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alect
I just bought a g Linksys router and the g devices seem to be connecting at g speeds while the b devices are connecting at b speeds.
You must have it set for B and G access. I'm wondering if it will still work with WEP or WPA security set up?
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Old Feb 23, 06, 6:56 pm   #10
 
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Why does it make a difference with WEP WPA WPA2...
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Old Feb 23, 06, 7:33 pm   #11
 
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G devices will say 54Mbps and won't ever show a slowdown. The network only actually slows down when B devices access it. So, if you don't have many B devices or keep 'em turned off, there's no need to worry. As for WPA vs. WEP, WPA is WiFi encryption that works. WEP is a joke. It will keep freeloaders off your network but that's about it. If someone wants in, they'll get in. I've used WPA with B/G compatible APs and routers before. The limiting factor is the WiFi client. If it can't do WPA you're hosed.
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Old Feb 23, 06, 9:51 pm   #12
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chichow

Alect: how are you measuring?
Well I don't pretend to know much about this at all - I too assumed that it would dumb down to b speeds for all connecting devices. I am basing my statement on what each device says it is connecting at.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kanebear
G devices will say 54Mbps and won't ever show a slowdown. The network only actually slows down when B devices access it. So, if you don't have many B devices or keep 'em turned off, there's no need to worry.
This may very well be the case.
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Old Feb 26, 06, 10:43 pm   #13
 
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I bought a G router and had it set to B/G mode. I noticed my machines with G adapters were reporting the slower B speed. I reset the G router to be G-only and the machines then reported the faster G speed. Go figure. Anyways, when necessary, I can just plug the B router into the G router.
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