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Old Jan 9, 06, 12:43 pm   #1
KathyMoore
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is it okay to save DVDs rented from Netflix and watch them on planes later?

I never buy any DVDs, since I've never watched a DVD more than once.

Never tried Netflix, but have been told by friends that the service is great. Is it okay to save DVDs rented from Netflix and watch them on planes later?

I don't feel it's safe to carry about rental DVDs on planes.
They could get lost and I'd be responsible for paying the
full price of a DVD to Netflix.

If I simply copy it to my laptop and watch on the plane,
it will just be deleted after it has been watched. For one
thing, each DVD is at least 4GB+ and my laptop only has
a 60GB drive(with less than 20GB free).

Any thoughts on this?
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Old Jan 9, 06, 12:52 pm   #2
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No it is not sadly.

You are allowed to make a personal copy of a DVD you OWN, but since that doesn't work in the case of Netflix you are not legally permitted to do so. Of course, whether or not you do so is up to you
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Old Jan 9, 06, 12:57 pm   #3
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yeah, that's what I figured... technically is should no be done...

the only reason I thought it might be okay is that I did pay for the $49 monthly rental membership fee, plus the fact that I still end up watching the movie only ONCE.

Oh well... guess I'll just have to be more careful bringing the rented DVDs with me.

Wait... I've heard there are websites where you can go and legally download movies for a fee. Can anybody recommend
a website? I think that might be a better choice for me.
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Old Jan 9, 06, 1:01 pm   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathyMoore
yeah, that's what I figured... technically is should no be done...

the only reason I thought it might be okay is that I did pay for the $49 monthly rental membership fee, plus the fact that I still end up watching the movie only ONCE.

Oh well... guess I'll just have to be more careful bringing the rented DVDs with me.

Wait... I've heard there are websites where you can go and legally download movies for a fee. Can anybody recommend
a website? I think that might be a better choice for me.

www.movielink.com
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Old Jan 9, 06, 1:02 pm   #5
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The newest player in town: www.vongo.com
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Old Jan 9, 06, 1:09 pm   #6
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I would simply bring the Netflix DVDs with you. I do it all the time. If you have a problem losing stuff on airplanes, then a $25 DVD should be the least of your concerns. Do whatever you need to do to fix that problem regardless of whether you go with Netflix.

By the way, Netflix ranges from about $10.50 per month (for 1 movie out at a time) up to the mid-$20's (for 5 movies at a time, I think) with a couple of tiers in between. If you watch even one movie a month, it's probably worth it unless you have an extremely convenient Blockbuster location that always has exactly what you want in stock. If you rent 2 or more movies a month, Netflix (or a similar service) is a no-brainer. We rent maybe 4 per month on the $10.50 plan and I cannot believe it took me so long to discover Netflix.

As for download sites, I don't know. I do not know of any out there that have similar selection to Netflix. And I know nothing about their pricing (e.g., per-movie, monthly subscription, etc.).
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Old Jan 9, 06, 1:29 pm   #7
 
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$49 monthly fee
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Old Jan 9, 06, 1:30 pm   #8
 
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no mac support

just tried both movielink and vongo neither supports mac
another problem with saving a movie is the amount of storage needed

are we all tired or charly and the chocolate thing...
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Old Jan 9, 06, 1:42 pm   #9
 
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Under RIAA v. Diamond Multimedia, it's legal to copy CDs you own onto an mp3 player. This is a practice called "space shifting," and is the basis for devices like the iPod as we know them today.

It should therefore be legal to copy DVDs you own to your hard drive for viewing on your laptop (ignoring the possibility that using some DVD ripping software may violate the Digital Millennium Copyright Act by breaking the CSS encryption on commercial DVD movies).

And I think you could make a very good argument that it's legal to copy rented DVDs to your hard drive, too, especially if you delete them from your hard drive before returning the DVD to NetFlix.

It's more questionable if you're keeping the copy on your hard drive longer than you keep the physical DVD from NetFlix, although I could make a good argument for that being legal, too.

I'm sure the MPAA would disagree, but how exactly are they going to seek enforcement?

As long as you're not distributing copies to third parties or keeping your copies to view them more than once, I personally don't think there's any real problem with copying movies to your hard drive.
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Old Jan 9, 06, 1:54 pm   #10
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by themicah
And I think you could make a very good argument that it's legal to copy rented DVDs to your hard drive, too, especially if you delete them from your hard drive before returning the DVD to NetFlix.
Since you paid to rent the item and not to purchase the item how would renting make it acceptable for one to copy the item in question? Renting does not constitute ownership or NetFlix would not ever get any of their DVDs back and would not be able to charge the replacement fee for the DVD in question...

Quote:
As long as you're not distributing copies to third parties or keeping your copies to view them more than once, I personally don't think there's any real problem with copying movies to your hard drive.
I've done this on long flights as DVDs playing from my HD use less power than DVDs playing from the CD/DVD drive ... as such I can watch a second movie on a 6+ hour flight without the need for a second battery...I use Netflix for travel entertainment but how I do it is bring the DVD along with me and then just delete the DVD image off my HD when I finish the movie and then mail it back to Netflix from where ever I happen to be ... Probably not legal but it works as far as Im concerned since the DVD never leaves the same city or state that I am in unless I am finished with it ...

Be warned that some Netflix movies are so scratched up that trying to rip or copy them is nearly impossible...guess what I am saying is plan ahead so you dont get stuck without a movie for a trip
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Old Jan 9, 06, 1:57 pm   #11
 
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I carry Netflix DVDs with me when I travel. I used to have the 4 DVDs at a time subscription, so I would take all 4 with me on long road trips to play on my laptop. Since these were trips within the US, I would just drop the DVDs in the mail when I finished with them as usual. By the time I got home, Netflix would have sent me the next DVDs in my queue and they'd be waiting in my mailbox.
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Old Jan 9, 06, 2:07 pm   #12
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by majorwibi
Since you paid to rent the item and not to purchase the item how would renting make it acceptable for one to copy the item in question? Renting does not constitute ownership or NetFlix would not ever get any of their DVDs back and would not be able to charge the replacement fee for the DVD in question...
By renting the DVD you take temporary ownership of both the physical disc and its content. You are obligated to return both the physical disc and the content to NetFlix when you are done with it, but until you return the disc, I see no reason why "space shifting" the content is illegal, unless it violates the NetFlix terms of service.

So as long as you delete the data from your hard drive before returning the disc, I don't think there's any problem.

Whether "time shifting" the content (i.e., keeping the copy longer than the disc and watching it later) is legal is a bit more problematic, but there are definitely arguments for why it should be legal within certain constraints.
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Old Jan 9, 06, 2:15 pm   #13
 
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copying NetFlix to hard drive?

Is it really possible to copy NetFlix DVDs to a hard drive? I thought those disks were protected.

I travel without the DVD drive and was thinking about this for two long trips coming up. But I'd prefer TV series segments to a movie, am looking into how to get those.

Sylvia
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Old Jan 9, 06, 2:15 pm   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by themicah
It's more questionable if you're keeping the copy on your hard drive longer than you keep the physical DVD from NetFlix, although I could make a good argument for that being legal, too.

I'm sure the MPAA would disagree, but how exactly are they going to seek enforcement?

As long as you're not distributing copies to third parties or keeping your copies to view them more than once, I personally don't think there's any real problem with copying movies to your hard drive.
Yeah, I agree...I don't see anything ethically wrong with viewing a hard-drive copy of a Netflix DVD and then deleting it before you return the disc. It's not a question of whether you'd get caught - you wouldn't - and I don't even think it's a question of right and wrong. You aren't violating the spirit of your Netflix subscription (e.g., using the strategy to hoard movies on a cheap plan) and you aren't sharing or retaining the content.

To me, I'd simply say...why? It doesn't seem worth the effort. Just throw the disc in your laptop bag and don't worry about manipulating the huge video files. Plus, you get the distinct advantage of getting to drop the DVD in a mailbox as soon as you're done with it - instead of having to go back home and then mail the DVDs.
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Old Jan 9, 06, 2:26 pm   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by themicah
Under RIAA v. Diamond Multimedia, it's legal to copy CDs you own onto an mp3 player. This is a practice called "space shifting," and is the basis for devices like the iPod as we know them today.
This was based on the AHRA - Audio Home Recording Act of 1992. It applies to audio only.

Quote:
Originally Posted by themicah
It should therefore be legal to copy DVDs you own to your hard drive for viewing on your laptop (ignoring the possibility that using some DVD ripping software may violate the Digital Millennium Copyright Act by breaking the CSS encryption on commercial DVD movies).
First, since AHRA doesn't apply to video, the legal citation means nothing.
Second, OP doesn't own the DVD's
Quote:
Originally Posted by themicah
And I think you could make a very good argument that it's legal to copy rented DVDs to your hard drive, too, especially if you delete them from your hard drive before returning the DVD to NetFlix.
You could certainly argue it. But you have no legal basis for it, IMHO.
Quote:
Originally Posted by themicah
As long as you're not distributing copies to third parties or keeping your copies to view them more than once, I personally don't think there's any real problem with copying movies to your hard drive.
Unfortunately, the law doesn't agree with you.

Last edited by CPRich; Jan 9, 06 at 2:36 pm.
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