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Old Sep 28, 14, 2:45 pm   #286
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Originally Posted by DenverBrian View Post
It's a plot to make us all carry murses.
You mean the European carry-all
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YgQDAKsOh-M

That's one thing I like about my 5S, the size works well for me. I prefer a phone that I can easily put in a pocket.
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Old Sep 28, 14, 3:01 pm   #287
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Originally Posted by boberonicus View Post
Based on the quotes you used, it sounds like it wasn't objective at all, right?
Consumer Reports test results find iPhone 6 and 6 Plus not as bendy as believed

Quote:
Our test

To stress test these phones, we used what’s called a “three-point flexural test,” in which the phone is supported at two points on either end, then force is applied at a third point on the top—you can see the testing for yourself in our video. We applied and measured the force using a high-precision Instron compression test machine. Along with the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus, we tested the LG G3, Samsung Galaxy Note 3, and HTC One (M8), and for those wondering about their old iPhones, we tested the iPhone 5 as well. We used one sample of each phone.

Yesterday, while we were testing and the "#bendgate" controversy was still swirling, Apple invited some journalists into its labs to show how the company stress tests iPhones. According to published reports, it seems that one of the tests Apple uses is the same three-point flexural test on a similar Instron machine.

The reports stated that Apple applies 25 kilograms (slightly more than 55 pounds) of force to an iPhone 6 Plus to test flex. What does 55 pounds mean in context? Using our Instron, we found that it's approximately the force required to break three pencils.

Consumer Reports' tests pushed the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus much further than 55 pounds. We started light, applying 10 pounds of force for 30 seconds, then releasing the force. Then we increased the force in 10-pound increments, noted when the phones first started to deform (that's what our engineers call it) and stopped the test for each phone when we saw the screen come loose from the case.

The results

All the phones we tested showed themselves to be pretty tough. The iPhone 6 Plus, the more robust of the new iPhones in our testing, started to deform when we reached 90 pounds of force, and came apart with 110 pounds of force. With those numbers, it slightly outperformed the HTC One (which is largely regarded as a sturdy, solid phone), as well as the smaller iPhone 6, yet underperformed some other smart phones.

Throughout most of our test, the LG G3 and Samsung Galaxy Note 3 bent, then recovered completely from each step up in force. But at 130 pounds, the case of the G3 fractured. At 150 pounds of force, the Note 3's screen splintered and it stopped working.

Impressively, despite some serious damage from our Instron machine, some of the phones continued to work. Several of the screens illuminated and were functional to the touch; we even completed a call from one phone to another.

Below you can see the pictures of the smart phone carnage, but bear in mind that it took significant force to do this kind of damage to all these phones. While nothing is (evidently) indestructible, we expect that any of these phones should stand up to typical use.

<snip>
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Old Sep 28, 14, 3:46 pm   #288
  
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http://gizmodo.com/the-smartest-expl...nds-1639513550
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Old Sep 29, 14, 8:05 am   #289
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I saw this analysis, and I think they're spot-on. Apple made a mistake by anchoring that brace where they did and made it worse by using a screw which becomes a pivot or fulcrum, effectively creating a lever which multiplies force.

Interestingly, the consumer reports test doesn't test for this particular failure. It's not about the raw force required to bend the phone in the middle, it's about applying force in a specific direction at a specific location on the phone. I suspect you'll see a much different bracing system in the iPhone 6S+.
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Old Sep 29, 14, 8:22 am   #290
  
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Originally Posted by SRQ Guy View Post
I saw this analysis, and I think they're spot-on. Apple made a mistake by anchoring that brace where they did and made it worse by using a screw which becomes a pivot or fulcrum, effectively creating a lever which multiplies force.

Interestingly, the consumer reports test doesn't test for this particular failure. It's not about the raw force required to bend the phone in the middle, it's about applying force in a specific direction at a specific location on the phone. I suspect you'll see a much different bracing system in the iPhone 6S+.
Now that consumer reports has a number for the force required to bend the phone at the center, I want to see how much force is required to bend at that weak spot as indicated in the article.
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Old Sep 29, 14, 8:27 am   #291
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Originally Posted by Need View Post
Now that consumer reports has a number for the force required to bend the phone at the center, I want to see how much force is required to bend at that weak spot as indicated in the article.
Agreed.
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Old Sep 29, 14, 2:59 pm   #292
  
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Remind me not to get iPhone 6 Plus in store display model...

http://metro.co.uk/2014/09/29/teenag...store-4885728/
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Old Sep 29, 14, 6:40 pm   #293
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Are the contract free TMobile "branded" phones sold in the US Apple Stores factory unlocked....? (ie. will they work with any nano-SIM?)
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Old Sep 29, 14, 7:04 pm   #294
  
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My understanding is that every iPhone sold at a US Apple store is initially unlocked and is the same model number now. The activation process apparently installs the appropriate carrier profile.
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Old Sep 29, 14, 8:24 pm   #295
  
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If you buy a full-price (officially called "device-only") T-Mobile, AT&T or Verizon iPhone 6/6 Plus at an Apple Store, it will be completely unlocked. Put in a SIM card and it'll work fine with that carrier.

This has been confirmed multiple times on macrumors.com and other forums. Don't listen to what Apple reps may tell you (either on the phone or at the store), I've heard so many different versions of locked/unlocked it's ridiculous. I myself picked up a device-only Verizon iPhone 6 that was working fine with a T-Mobile SIM I had laying around (this was purchased as a gift for a relative overseas). FWIW, Verizon iPhones (since the iPhone 5) have been GSM-unlocked from day one anyway.

Do not get a Sprint phone though, as those are indeed locked.

You can only buy a full-price T-Mobile iPhone online, so the "device-only" Verizon or AT&T one will have to be done in-store.
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Old Sep 30, 14, 10:58 am   #296
  
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I spent the better part of the past 2 weeks researching the best way to upgrade to an iPhone 6. I'm U.S. based and wanted the ability to swap in a foreign SIM when traveling abroad but also wanted to know the cheapest way to purchase the iPhone 6 as soon as possible. I ended up compiling all of the data that I found to try and make an easy to use guide for others considering an upgrade.

I hope that some might find this useful and hopefully save a couple hours of confusion on the internet! The full post can be found here: Weekend Blitz - How-to: Buy an “Unlocked” iPhone 6 for International Travel

--------------------------------------------------------

The iPhone 6 mania is amongst us. That special time of the year where the overlords at Apple tell us what we’ll be spending our money on immediately. So, unless you’ve been living under a rock, you know that the iPhone 6 is out and that you want, no, need to have it ASAP.


I was about to pledge my allegiance to Verizon for the next 2 years and renew my contract but wanted to have the flexibility to use my new smartphone abroad, possibly using a foreign carrier’s SIM card. So, my nagging question that I needed answered before getting my hands on the newest iGadget:

What’s the best iPhone 6 to get for international travel?

Is it possible to get an unlocked iPhone 6? If not, who’s the best U.S. carrier to get it from to increase the chances it can be used abroad?

Here’s the short and sweet version, mostly summarized from the great information found at Techwalls.com:


The TL;DR version of that chart (but c’mon, the chart was so short and simple!): The most versatile is the A1586 (4.7″ screen) or A1524 (5.5″ screen) model that is sold by Sprint, C Spire, US Cellular as it has the capability of being the most functional abroad. The downside is that Sprint, C Spire, US Cellular only sell locked versions of their phones with a 2-year contract, so you’ll be out of luck if trying to insert another company’s SIM card (there is a chance that you can get the phone unlocked after 90 days, but it doesn’t sound like it’s a guarantee). For me, that was a deal killer as I really wanted the option of using the phone with a foreign provider. The next best option is to purchase an unlocked iPhone 6 A1586 or A1524 on the open market, since Apple hasn’t started selling them unlocked yet. This, too, was a deal breaker for me as they’re $870+ on Amazon or as much as $1,167 on eBay (ships from Hong Kong or Sydney).

Comparisons by Cellular Provider

BEST: Sprint or U.S. Cellular A1586/A1524


Pros: Most versatile, you can get access to TD-LTE and TD-SCDMA bands which opens up use to basically every carrier in the world, this will prove to be especially useful in China

Cons: An unlocked version could cost between $870-$1,167. If you get the subsidized version from Sprint for $199, it will assuredly be locked and you won’t be able to use the phone with a foreign carrier abroad. Sure, you’ll be well connected when paying Sprint the $1.99/minute roaming rates but out of luck if you want to use an external SIM. There is a chance that Sprint will unlock the phone for you after 90 days. Even if you get it unlocked, you can’t activate it on Verizon in the future due to the “whitelisting” issue described below.

GREAT: Verizon A1549 (CDMA)/A1522 (CDMA)


Pros: UNLOCKED for foreign SIM cards (**probably**), while you’re missing out on the new TD-LTE bands, it’s still not that widespread and you’ll still have a very functional phone. You can get the 16GB iPhone 6 for $199 with a 2-year contract; you’ll get a “whitelisted” phone that is guaranteed to work on Verizon in the future.

Cons: Missing out on the TD-LTE bands, which might slow you down in China/Europe with some providers

GOOD: T-Mobile A1549 (GSM)/A1522 (GSM)


Pros: Because T-Mobile doesn’t make you lock into a contract, the phone will be UNLOCKED for foreign SIM cards, you’ll pay ~$27/month for 24-months for the base iPhone 6 instead; T-Mobile Simple Choice plan (our review of it here) is the best available for international roaming

Cons: You’ll be missing the TD-LTE bands and the CDMA bands, you wouldn’t have the option of moving this phone to Verizon (it won’t be on Verizon’s whitelist) or Sprint because the hardware is more limited

LEAST FLEXIBLE: AT&T A1549 (GSM)/A1522 (GSM)


Pros: If you’re an existing AT&T customer and want to stick with them while you’re in the U.S., this would be the easiest route

Cons: Same as the T-Mobile issues: you’ll be limited abroad since you’ll just have access to the GSM and FD-LTE bands, even the contract-free full-price iPhone 6’s will likely come locked, you’ll have to wait up to 60 days and then request an unlock code from AT&T here (Request a device unlock for your AT&T Mobile Devices (Phones and Tablets)) and hope that they honor it.

What are you missing by not having the full TD-LTE access? Is it worth it?

The following is a list of worldwide cellular network providers that have adopted the fast, new TD-LTE technology on some or all of their network. What does this mean? This is an indication of how valuable having the most capable iPhone 6 might be to you. It answers the question, is paying the full price of $870-$1,167 for the iPhone 6 model # A1586 (4.7″) / A1524 (5.5″) (offered by Sprint/U.S. Cellular in the US) worth it?

For example, the chart below tells you that if you get the Verizon or T-Mobile/AT&T phones and then go to Sweden and insert a SIM card from the cell provider “3”, you might not be getting access to the fastest speed internet that they offer because you won’t be able to tap into the TD-LTE bands. Does that mean that the service won’t work at all? In this case, no, not at all: you’ll still have service in Sweden because “3” also broadcasts the other LTE bands as well.

The one country that not having TD-LTE and TD-SCDMA will be rather limiting is China, so if China is a place you envision extensive use then you should probably jump through the hoops to secure the 1586 (4.7″) / A1524 (5.5″) model (offered by Sprint/U.S. Cellular in the US).

Africa
Algeria – Algerie Telecom
Ivory Coast – YooMee
Madagascar – Blueline
Nigeria – Spectranet
Nigeria – SWIFT
South Africa – Telkom / 8ta
Uganda – MTN

South America
Brazil – On Telecom
Brazil – SKY Brasil
Colombia – DirecTV

North America
Canada – ABC Communications
United States – Sprint (formerly Clearwire)

Asia
China – China Mobile
China – China Telecom
China – China Unicom
Hong Kong – China Mobile
India – Aircel
India – Airtel
Indonesia – PT Internux / Bolt
Japan – SoftBank
Philippines – Globe
Philippines – PLDT
Sri Lanka – Dialog
Sri Lanka – Lanka Bell
Sri Lanka – SLT

Europe
Belgium – b-lite
Poland – Aero2
Russia – MegaFon
Russia – MTS
Russia – Rostelecom
Russia – Vainakh Telecom
Spain – COTA / Murcia4G
Spain – NEO-SKY
Sweden – 3
United Kingdom – UK Broadband
United Kingdom – UK Broadband

Middle East
Bahrain – Menatelecom
Oman – Omantel
Saudi Arabia – Mobily
Saudi Arabia – STC
Saudi Arabia – Zain

Oceania
Australia – NBN Co
Australia – Optus
Vanuatu – WanTok

Wireless band specs

T-Mobile/AT&T – A1549 (GSM)/A1522 (GSM)
GSM: GSM/EDGE (850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHz)
LTE: Bands 1 (2100 MHz), 2 (1900 MHz), 3 (1800 MHz), 4 (AWS), 5 (850 MHz), 7 (2600 MHz), 8 (900 MHz), 13 (700c MHz), 17 (700b MHz), 18 (800 MHz), 19 (800 MHz), 20 (800 DD), 25 (1900 MHz), 26 (800 MHz), 28 (700 APT MHz) and 29 (700 de MHz)
Other: UMTS/HSPA+/DC-HSDPA (850, 900, 1700/2100, 1900, 2100 MHz)

Verizon/Cricket – A1549 (CDMA)/A1522 (CDMA)

GSM: (same as above) GSM/EDGE (850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHz)
LTE: (same as above) Bands 1 (2100 MHz), 2 (1900 MHz), 3 (1800 MHz), 4 (AWS), 5 (850 MHz), 7 (2600 MHz), 8 (900 MHz), 13 (700c MHz), 17 (700b MHz), 18 (800 MHz), 19 (800 MHz), 20 (800 DD), 25 (1900 MHz), 26 (800 MHz), 28 (700 APT MHz) and 29 (700 de MHz)
Other: (same as above) UMTS/HSPA+/DC-HSDPA (850, 900, 1700/2100, 1900, 2100 MHz)
CDMA: CDMA EV-DO Rev. A and Rev. B (with 800, 1700/2100, 1900 and 2100 MHz bands)

Sprint/C Spire/US Cellular – A1586/A1524

GSM: (same as above) GSM/EDGE (850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHz)
LTE: (same as above) Bands 1 (2100 MHz), 2 (1900 MHz), 3 (1800 MHz), 4 (AWS), 5 (850 MHz), 7 (2600 MHz), 8 (900 MHz), 13 (700c MHz), 17 (700b MHz), 18 (800 MHz), 19 (800 MHz), 20 (800 DD), 25 (1900 MHz), 26 (800 MHz), 28 (700 APT MHz) and 29 (700 de MHz)
Other: (same as above) UMTS/HSPA+/DC-HSDPA (850, 900, 1700/2100, 1900, 2100 MHz)
CDMA: (same as above) CDMA EV-DO Rev. A and Rev. B (with 800, 1700/2100, 1900 and 2100 MHz bands)
TD-SCDMA: Bands TD-SCDMA 1900 (F), 2000 (A).
TD-LTE: TD-LTE (Bands 38, 39, 40, 41 which are corresponding to frequencies 2600 Mhz, 1900 Mhz, 2300 Mhz and 2500 Mhz).

Summary

So, to summarize, if you’re looking for ease of use without having to wait, these are the 2 iPhone 6 models that come unlocked out of the box and will work in all countries around the world (with the exception of the TD-LTE band):
  1. Verizon Wireless A1549 CDMA (4.7″) or A1522 CDMA (5.5″)
  2. T-Mobile A1549 GSM (4.7″) or A1522 GSM (5.5″)


My Ultimate Decision


I ended up getting the Verizon Wireless A1549 CDMA (4.7″) model for a few reasons:
  • Verizon Wireless coverage is much better than T-Mobile in the areas that I live and travel within the U.S.
  • I was due for an upgrade and didn’t have to deal with the hassle of porting my number to T-Mobile
  • While I like the T-Mobile Simple Choice Plan for traveling internationally (it gives you unlimited data and texting while abroad for free and all voice calls are just $0.20/min), the whole point of securing an unlocked world phone is being able to use a foreign providers’ SIM cards and avoid paying the roaming fees at all
  • The Verizon iPhone 6 can be switched to the T-Mobile network at anytime whereas the T-Mobile iPhone 6 cannot be transferred to the Verizon network because Verizon only authorizes the serial numbers of the iPhones that originate on their service.
  • The Verizon model is GSM, LTE and CDMA capable, giving me many more options when traveling abroad


Don’t forget:
  • All carriers use a different model number; you will have to cross reference the table and information found at Tech Walls to verify the model you are getting: Tech Walls – Differences between iPhone 6 Models (A1549, A1586, A1522 and A1524)
  • For example, the Verizon Wireless A1549 CDMA (4.7″) comes in 3x colors and in 3x memory sizes for a total of 9 possible models. So, if you go to the Verizon or Apple website and order, you’ll see that you’re getting MG5Y2LL/A, MG5W2LL/A or MG612LL/A, etc… and want to double check to verify that that model is in fact the A1549 CDMA.

---------------------------------
Full post with proper formatting, more images and links can be found here: Weekend Blitz - How-to: Buy an “Unlocked” iPhone 6 for International Travel

Last edited by jmgriffin; Sep 30, 14 at 11:39 am
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Old Sep 30, 14, 11:37 am   #297
  
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jmgriffin, good summary, but I think you swapped the 2 cells in your table of "Unlocked: Verizon" and "Unlocked: T-Mobile".

I wanted to get a full priced Verizon but as I understand you cannot buy one unless you already have a Verizon account. And I think you cannot get it in store, you have to order it online login with your Verizon account as my coworker told me. I am with AT&T so I have to either buy the T-Mobile one or wait until Apple store release the GSM sim free version in Nov which would probably be identical to the T-Mobile version.

I guess CDMA bands are really not that useful unless I want to switch to Verizon some day and still be using the same phone. So the only difference really is TD-LTE.
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Old Sep 30, 14, 11:40 am   #298
  
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jmgriffin, good summary, but I think you swapped the 2 cells in your table of "Unlocked: Verizon" and "Unlocked: T-Mobile".
Good catch, this has been corrected. Thanks!
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Old Sep 30, 14, 11:48 am   #299
  
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At the Apple online store, you can order the T-Mobile full price one and that presumably is unlocked?
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Old Sep 30, 14, 12:09 pm   #300
  
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At the Apple online store, you can order the T-Mobile full price one and that presumably is unlocked?
That's what all reports say. I'll be able to confirm tomorrow.
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