Go Back   FlyerTalk Forums > Travel&Dining > Travel Products
Sign in using an external account

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Mar 2, 13, 4:37 pm   #1
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Maryland
Programs: ET, SB, NSPA, OIL, AOR, DAOPA, HH
Posts: 393
One bag carryon Travel Ninja tips (1 week business travel): Your time to brag (RULES)

For all those who are maniacal about carrying only 1 bag, and need to travel on business often for a week (or maybe more), how about a thread with your tips on how you do it? (And of course, implicit bragging opportunity here).

Criteria for Posting:
1) No long essays, state your product, a few lines on why its the best product since sliced bread, a link if possible.

2) No two bag systems, no matter how small the 2nd bag is. If you are carrying a laptop bag or a tote and another carryon, then its a 2 bag system.(Note: If you are offended as a 2 bagger you are not a Ninja, be at peace. It's like comparing Wushu to Judo - both are probably cool in their own way. This is the Wushu thread for one-baggers, you'll be a ninja in your Judo thread ). updated: (see discussion in thread below) - if you are a 2 bagger, but are able to stuff in your 2nd bag into the first one and still have the airlines accept your bag dimensions as a viable carryon, you get ninja one-bag status.

3) This is a NINJA thread, which means your one bag MUST be a carry on, and must be able to accomodate your 1 week needs. (Overnight one baggers are trivial and doesn't qualify for the elite Ninja status )

So lets have some fun... My post will follow soon.


Last edited by arjunrc; Mar 5, 13 at 3:01 pm.
arjunrc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 2, 13, 5:02 pm   #2
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Maryland
Programs: ET, SB, NSPA, OIL, AOR, DAOPA, HH
Posts: 393
My one bag for 1 week system

(Thanks to various flyertalk members for may of these gems)

I may keep updating this list as I remember more.

*) My bag of choice: Gate8 Trifold wheeled bag. (My review (old V1 version))
Updated: Dec 2013: Gate8 has a V2 version now, that solves much of the old problems. New review HERE

Why is it the best for me: Wheeled, no shoulder pain. Fits on all airlines overheads including small jets including europe. Easily fits in a suit, a jacket and enough clothes + shoes for a 5 day trip. Has a detachable laptop bag which is uber cool. Its a garment bag, so it keeps everything crease-free (I don't like the bundle packing method - never works for me, looks ugly)


*) My accessory gizmo organizer: Cocoon Grid-it 12x8. You can see how I use it here

Why is it best for me: Keeps all my accessories in one place, fits flat into my laptop bag for easy access.

*) My key gizmos that have been a huge help: (only listing the unique ones, all of these and more fit into my cocoon organizer)
The Edimax nano router
Why is it best for me: matchbox sized, helps me use a single hotel wifi with all my devices. (My Amazon Review is here - note the one disadvantage) - Updated Dec 2013: This issue has been fixed by their new firmware as of Dec 2013

The Kikkerland Travel adapter. The flattest adapter you can find in the market.
Why is it best for me: Given that I need to layer my accessories into the same compartment as my latop, I need it to be as flat as possible. Update: Aug 2013: It seems this adapter may not work in countries that require a ground/earth 3rd prong. I haven't experienced problems but please watch out for this and validate it.

*) My list of packable clothing to keep you warm while outside and not sweat while inside. Needs to work when wearing a suit:

Base layer: Ice-breaker 200 long sleeve tops and bottoms.
Why is it best for me: Excellent base layer, soft, keeps me warm when outside in winter and keeps me from feeling too hot when in temperature controlled rooms. Can be reused for multiple days without smell. Easy to hand wash and dries quickly. If you don't like wool, take a look at Under Armor.

Coat: the Tumi microfiber II insulated jacket.
Why is it best for me: Very packable and light, keeps me warm even at 30 degrees and high winds even without a base layer. Looks acceptable on suits as well as informals. (I can't take one for each type of dressing!). Updated Dec 2013: Only issue I found is the zipper is bad - unexpected given its name. I replaced the #5 zippers with #8 YKK


*) My choice of in-air ear phones:

The Audio-technica ATH-ANC23 ear phones with active noise cancelling. Update June 2013: I lost the pair recently in a trip. I am not holding off for the ATH-ANC33iS - same as above, but adds a microphone - which is useful to answer/make calls.

Why is it best for me: Excellent noise canceling, very light weight, I can sleep with it (I ditched my Bose QC because its great, but not NINJA optimized - too bulky and you can't sleep on your side, especially if you are traveling business on a flat bed). A Modification: I replaced its ear buds and attached the air-bud ear-buds making it much more comfortable.

Updated Dec 2013: I've replaced it with the Bose QC20i --> I find audio quality similar but the Bose noise canceling is superior. And unlike old Bose QC models, this one is in-ear, incredibly comfortable and can work even without batteries (obviously NC won't work)



*)My overflow bag: (Updated Mar 4 2013)

I currently use a packable wanderlite , but I'll soon be changing to the Sea-to-summit compact bag. I think it's better. (Update Jun 2013). I switched. See here.

Why is it best for me: Stuff happens, towards the end of the trip, you may pick up something new. Your kids way want a new toy, your wife may want a new dress, you may want those new bottles of booze that are great in that country.... These bags pack into very small spaces and I stuff them inside my one bag, should the need ever arise.

*) Essential electronics:
1) My Macbook (Air or Pro)
2) (I am waiting for this to be released) iPad Mini Retina display
3) Kindle 3G (don't like reading on iPad)
4) My iPhone
(I really don't need to put a why above, would be obvious)

*) Essential Travel Apps:
1) Google Translate.

Why is it best for me: Helps me figure out if I'm eating frog or chicken or snake in countries that don't speak english. It also allows you to speak a language and translates to english (so sometimes, I ask the waiter to speak, and then I see what the translation is). Also speaks out the translation (helps when I scream Oooo-eeee! when it really should sound more like Wi)

I must admit, the new windows 8 phone has a cool FREE feature where you can snap a picture and it uses Bing to translate the text in that image - amazingly useful for foreign menus and sign boards. I don't know of an equivalent app in iPhone - there is Word Lens, but its very limited.

2) Stuff I'm not listing: checkin apps of various airlines for mobile boarding passes

3) Google Maps:
Why is it best for me: I can't survive without a GPS, and it has a useful walking mode.

(Updated Jun 2013)
4) Word Lens: Great tool to convert between French, German, Italian, Spanish and English

5) WayGo Translate - for Chinese to English



*) My notebook - in this day and age of digitization, it really is not important to carry thick planners. At the same time, its often not appreciated typing away
on your keyboard as your customer speaks to you (you lose eye contact and the tapping is irksome). So I carry a compact leather cover - you can slip any notepad into it. Has a place for a pen, and cards.
Looks professional, takes very less space. I picked one up from Target - probably as large as a kindle 3G. I never exhaust that pad in a single trip.

*) My neck-pillow choice: Currently a cheap one from the airport - plain material on one half, so I don't sneeze at higher altitudes. Has a button clip so I can clip it to my bag. Looking for recommendations here for an amazing one that inflates and is comfortable.

*) My toiletries pack: Just a 1 gallon ziploc - always in my front pocket for easy access.

*) (Updated Dec 2013) Shaving tools: CO Bigelow (Proraso) shaving cream and the Muhle Silvertip v2 travel brush (If you think badger brushes are the best, you need to try this synthetic. Really)

*) My ninja packing tips:
1) I never pack for more than 5 days. If my trip goes beyond that I laundry.
My 5 day business trip pack includes: 2 (typical) -3 (not often) shirts, 1 suit, 1 pair of shoes (optional), undergarments, my base layer clothes, 2 t-shirts, one jeans, my outerwear jacket - all in my bag of choice

*) My ninja checkin tips:
1) Keep your laptop in a top open accessible system - so you can bend and pull it out while on the move
2) Keep your toiletries in a transparent pouch and again easily accessible to pull out - DON'T stuff it inside your clothes
3) Wear loafers not laces shoes - easy to slip out of
4) While in line, I take my watch, wallet, phone and put it into my jacket pocket and zip it up - easier than putting it in a separate box while taking it away on the other side
5) Utilize your time in the security line to keep your bags ready to pull out the stuff that needs to be scanned
6) Always know where your important stuff is - your wallet, your phone, your ticket, your ID - so you don't waste time.

*) My ninja travel comfort tips while in the flight (applies when I am flying economy. For business class travel, I drink more!):
1) Don't drink in flights less than 5 hrs. It dehydrates. Drink 2 and go to sleep for longer flights (it helps you go to sleep)
2) Listen to soothing music along with noise-cancellation earphones is a great help. I tried white noise apps - did not work for me. My soothing music
of choice: Sungha-Jung or David Garrett (This changes from time to time)
3) I always pop a claritin-D before 5+ hours travel flights.

i) My leisure time travel shoes of choice, to wear with jeans while 'chillin' out after work': (updated Jun 2013) - NB Minumus shoes (see this post)

Last edited by arjunrc; Dec 13, 13 at 11:35 am.
arjunrc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 3, 13, 10:48 am   #3
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Chicago
Programs: UA, AA, Hyatt, SPG, National
Posts: 65
Arjun,

Great idea for a thread -- hopefully we can build some momentum for sharing best practices.

MY BAG OF CHOICE: Tom Binh Western Flyer with a luggage sleeve coupled with the Absolute Shoulder Strap (for a much more comfortable carrying experience)
(http://www.tombihn.com/PROD/TB0950.html)

Versatile and thoughtfully-designed, dual compartmentalized bag that fits in overhead compartment of CRJ commuter jets. In the first compartment, I slide an iPad and a Macbook Air behind a a small Tom Binh packing cube (for t-shirts, boxers, workout shorts and socks) and a medium Tom Binh packing cube (for button down and dress shirts). In the second compartment, I fit a large Tom Binh packing cube (for slacks, ties, a Rohan travel suit and a pair of Vibrams workout shoes), a gadget bag and a Tom Binh clear organizer cube (for toiletries) in the second compartment. The outside pockets are perfect for carrying passports, keys, papers, pens, etc. Another great thing about the Western Flyer is that it couples beautifully with a Rimowa Salsa Deluxe cabin trolley for trips with the family.

MY ACCESSORY GIZMO ORGANIZER: 2 Cocoon Grid-It CPG8's (http://www.amazon.com/Cocoon-CPG8BK-...on+Gridit+CPG8) and Built NY Travel Cargo Organizer (http://www.amazon.com/BUILT-Cargo-Tr...+Accessory+Bag).

I'm having a local tailor remove the annex clips in the second compartment of the Tom Binh bag and sew in corner velcro patches that will secure 2 10.5" x 7.5" Cocoon Grid-Its vertically in the bag. In so doing, I expect to be able to distribute the space in the compartment more efficiently to permanently store all of the sundry gadgets needed for business travel (more on that below). The Built NY organizer is a nice form-fitting carrier for items that I'd like to have at arm's reach during flights.

USEFUL GIZMO'S

Concur wholeheartedly about the Edimax Nano Router and the Kikkerland travel adapter. Other things I wouldn't leave home without ...

- Skiva 4-port USB charger http://www.amazon.com/Skiva-PowerFlo...rt+USB+charger
- Anker Slimtalk portable USB charger (fits in a shirt pocket) (http://www.amazon.com/SlimTalk-Exter...Anker+Slimtalk)
- Satechi power station (http://www.amazon.com/Satechi-Portab...+power+station)
- Mifi router (I use an unlocked Huawei e587)
- Noise canceling earphones (I use a Sony MDR-NC100D) coupled with Airbuds and moldable earplugs ... works beautifully on flights and during workouts ... I also make sure to pack spare Airbuds and AAA batteries (http://www.amazon.com/Sony-MDRNC100D...ony+MDR-NC100d)
- Portable GPS sensor (about 1/3 size of a deck of cards) (http://www.amazon.com/Dual-Electroni...s=external+GPS)
- Sony RX100 camera (great picture quality, recharges via microUSB, rectracting lens cover) that replaced the bulky, heavy Nikon DSLR camera that my wife used to foist on me to lug around (http://www.amazon.com/Sony-DSC-RX100...rds=Sony+RX100)
- small USB card reader (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...?ie=UTF8&psc=1)

CLOTHING TO PACK

I can not emphasize enough the importance of layering. For base layers, I like to use extremely lightweight and comfortable synthetics from companies like Wickers (boxers) and Rohan (t-shirts). I also like to pack a quarter zip Merino sweater (lightweight, but very warm) and a Uniqlo ultralight hooded rain parka (literally as light as a feather). For cold weather trips, I would also include a North Face Summit Series windbreaker and 180s wraparound earmuffs and travel gloves.

For shoes, I try to travel with a single, comfortable pair. For leisure trips that involve some dressier venues, I use a pair of black Kenneth Cole Punchual shoes (http://www.amazon.com/Kenneth-Cole-R...+Cole+Punchual). For business trips, I use a pair of black Bruno Magli Maioco oxfords (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...?ie=UTF8&psc=1). For casual leisure trips, I use a pair of Camper Peu (http://www.camper.com/en_US/men/shoe...-peu-17665-011).

NINJA TRAVEL TIPS

1. Pack clothing as sparingly as possible (especially base layers, which can be easily washed in hotel sinks and quickly air dried) and carry travel-sized packets of Tide detergent and Shout to Go wipes.

2. Dramatically reduce your toiletries footprint by buying miniature bottles and containers that hold the bare minimum of items like deodorant, shaving cream, toothpaste, cologne, sunscreen, mosquito repellant, ointment, cold medicine, etc. I have a pretty extensive toiletries list, but am able to fit everything including a Gillette razor, travel toothbrush, nail clippers, tweezers, mouthwash strips and a sewing kit into a small Tom Binh clear toiletries packing cube.

3. Keep detailed and organized packing lists on your smartphone and in the cloud. I use a program called ColorNote for Android and have packing lists by category (clothing, toiletries, gadgets, baby items, etc.). This way, I can make sure that I don't forget anything before or during trips. This is especially important because I absolutely loathe packing.

4. Keep a bag packed and set aside. This includes replenishing items in your toiletries kit as soon as you return from a trip. Packing the night before or the day of your trip is always unnecessarily stressful.

5. Plan for worst case scenarios. Scan your family's passports and children's birth certificates and store on the cloud (I use Google Drive). Use an app like Flightcaster to project the odds of your flight being delayed six hours ahead of time.

6. Always carry a pen on your keychain (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...?ie=UTF8&psc=1)

Last edited by vikmurthy; Mar 3, 13 at 5:52 pm.
vikmurthy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 4, 13, 12:47 pm   #4
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Maryland
Programs: ET, SB, NSPA, OIL, AOR, DAOPA, HH
Posts: 393
Thanks Vikmurthy, great list as usual. Thanks for the note on the RX100 - I've been eyeing it for a while. My primary interest really is night shots - and no matter which camera I buy, none of them stack up to D-SLR quality for low noise stuff. But the RX has most promise vs. size.

Questions:
1) What do you use the portable GPS for?
2) Have you owned icebreakers? If you have, why did you go with Wickers, both being Merino?

Comments:
1) Absolutely agree on scanning everything - all my important travel documents are on Google Drive too. For double measure, I also have a remote web sharing activated on my home NAS - so I can connect to it from other places if I need to grab some document that I don't feel comfortable keeping in the cloud.
arjunrc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 4, 13, 7:21 pm   #5
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Chicago
Programs: UA, AA, Hyatt, SPG, National
Posts: 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by arjunrc View Post
1) What do you use the portable GPS for?
2) Have you owned icebreakers? If you have, why did you go with Wickers, both being Merino?
1) I ALWAYS like knowing where I am. Plus, it's nice to have redundancy with a backup GPS to use with offline maps overseas. My smartphone's GPS is A-GPS meaning that it works better with internet connectivity. If, for some reason, I don't have network connectivity, I can still feel confident in having a fix on my location. Plus, it's so small and lightweight that it's not a burden to lug around.

2) I have not owned Icebreakers. I looked at buying some of their base layers recently at a specialty outdoor clothing store, and wasn't impressed with either the feel and comfort or the price/value of what I was shown. Perhaps it was a function of a limited selection (all the best stuff appeared to have been long sold out). I gravitated to Wickers simply based on personal preference -- very lightweight, silk texture and feel without the drawback of silk care and upkeep, reasonably priced ...
vikmurthy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 4, 13, 11:30 pm   #6
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: YVR/YYZ/EWR/ATL/LHR/GLA
Programs: Air Canada Altitude S100k / Star Alliance Gold
Posts: 140
My bag of choice:[/u] Gate8 Trifold wheeled bag. (My review)

Why is it the best for me: Wheeled, no shoulder pain. Fits on all airlines overheads including small jets including europe. Easily fits in a suit, a jacket and enough clothes + shoes for a 5 day trip. Has a detachable laptop bag which is uber cool

----------------------------

So if you detach your laptop bag doesn't that mean you are, in fact, really a two-bagger?
Always@YVR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 5, 13, 5:29 am   #7
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Maryland
Programs: ET, SB, NSPA, OIL, AOR, DAOPA, HH
Posts: 393
Quote:
Originally Posted by Always@YVR View Post
So if you detach your laptop bag doesn't that mean you are, in fact, really a two-bagger?
As much as drinking beer when wine is not an option makes me a beer-drinker.

I didn't say 'I detach'. I said 'has a detachable laptop'. But you probably knew that.

There are only two times I detach: a) When I need to fit the bag into a CRJ overhead and I've packed in 5 days worth of clothes. b) I drive to a customer meeting while on travel - I leave the rest of the bag in the trunk.
arjunrc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 5, 13, 6:15 am   #8
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: YVR/YYZ/EWR/ATL/LHR/GLA
Programs: Air Canada Altitude S100k / Star Alliance Gold
Posts: 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by arjunrc View Post
As much as drinking beer when wine is not an option makes me a beer-drinker.

I didn't say 'I detach'. I said 'has a detachable laptop'. But you probably knew that.

There are only two times I detach: a) When I need to fit the bag into a CRJ overhead and I've packed in 5 days worth of clothes. b) I drive to a customer meeting while on travel - I leave the rest of the bag in the trunk.
If you are heading to a customer meeting from your hotel and then heading back to the hotel afterwards, do you detach the laptop bag, or do you bring your garment bag to the meeting?
Always@YVR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 5, 13, 7:11 am   #9
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Maryland
Programs: ET, SB, NSPA, OIL, AOR, DAOPA, HH
Posts: 393
Quote:
Originally Posted by Always@YVR View Post
If you are heading to a customer meeting from your hotel and then heading back to the hotel afterwards, do you detach the laptop bag, or do you bring your garment bag to the meeting?
I would only carry the laptop bag in such a situation. No sense in carrying extra load if you don't need it.
arjunrc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 5, 13, 9:46 am   #10
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: YVR/YYZ/EWR/ATL/LHR/GLA
Programs: Air Canada Altitude S100k / Star Alliance Gold
Posts: 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by arjunrc View Post
I would only carry the laptop bag in such a situation. No sense in carrying extra load if you don't need it.
...so you really are a two-bagger Arjunrc! A true one-bag solution is challenging for business trips...it is hard to conceive of one piece of luggage that can carry business attire for a week, can fit overhead in a regional jet, and can also be taken to business meetings. Realistically, two bags are required (whether or not they are zipped together) with the second being a small piece that looks acceptable in the boardroom.

Appreciate some of the great tips you shared...I have ordered a Grid-It and a Kikkerland adapter thanks to your wisdom!
Always@YVR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 5, 13, 10:20 am   #11
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Maryland
Programs: ET, SB, NSPA, OIL, AOR, DAOPA, HH
Posts: 393
Quote:
Originally Posted by Always@YVR View Post
...so you really are a two-bagger Arjunrc! A true one-bag solution is challenging for business trips...it is hard to conceive of one piece of luggage that can carry business attire for a week, can fit overhead in a regional jet, and can also be taken to business meetings. Realistically, two bags are required (whether or not they are zipped together) with the second being a small piece that looks acceptable in the boardroom.

Appreciate some of the great tips you shared...I have ordered a Grid-It and a Kikkerland adapter thanks to your wisdom!
No, I don't agree with your definition of a two bagger.

If you are carrying two separate bags for the most part (travel to airport, checkin, while on flight), you are a two bagger.
If you are carrying just one bag for the most part, and that bag in its entirety fits into the dimensions of what is considered one bag by airlines and the airlines agree its one bag, then its one bag. (Why do airlines need to agree its one bag? Simple - many airlines today charge you for a second luggage, irrespective of its size). Exceptions don't prove the rule here, Generality does.

I could easily answer your question by saying 'Yes, I take my garment bag to meetings as well even if I have the option to keep it in the hotel' but that would be stupid. That's not the same as saying 'I don't take it because the bag looks unprofessional to take to the customer'. Having the _option_ to split into two is different from always being _forced_ to carry two. Exceptional cases (CRJs + 5 days worth of clothes) which mandate a two bag split of a one bag are also not justifications that ergo, this is a two bag system.
Here is another exception: If I shop, and my bag overflows, and I travel in a CRJ, I use 3 bags! - I need to take out my overflow bag. Oh no. So I am really a 3 bagger, because we found one scenario.

I doubt you'll agree, but I don't think it matters. Its fine if you think your two bag system is the inevitable truth, really.

You are welcome re: other tips.

Last edited by arjunrc; Mar 5, 13 at 10:40 am.
arjunrc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 5, 13, 11:03 am   #12
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: YVR/YYZ/EWR/ATL/LHR/GLA
Programs: Air Canada Altitude S100k / Star Alliance Gold
Posts: 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by arjunrc View Post
No, I don't agree with your definition of a two bagger.

If you are carrying two separate bags for the most part (travel to airport, checkin, while on flight), you are a two bagger.
If you are carrying just one bag for the most part, and that bag in its entirety fits into the dimensions of what is considered one bag by airlines and the airlines agree its one bag, then its one bag. (Why do airlines need to agree its one bag? Simple - many airlines today charge you for a second luggage, irrespective of its size). Exceptions don't prove the rule here, Generality does.

I could easily answer your question by saying 'Yes, I take my garment bag to meetings as well even if I have the option to keep it in the hotel' but that would be stupid. That's not the same as saying 'I don't take it because the bag looks unprofessional to take to the customer'. Having the _option_ to split into two is different from always being _forced_ to carry two. Exceptional cases (CRJs + 5 days worth of clothes) which mandate a two bag split of a one bag are also not justifications that ergo, this is a two bag system.
Here is another exception: If I shop, and my bag overflows, and I travel in a CRJ, I use 3 bags! - I need to take out my overflow bag. Oh no. So I am really a 3 bagger, because we found one scenario.

I doubt you'll agree, but I don't think it matters. Its fine if you think your two bag system is the inevitable truth, really.

You are welcome re: other tips.

Thanks Arjunc. I'm a little confused, because in your original post you outline several criteria for posting, one of which is:

"2) No two bag systems, no matter how small the 2nd bag is. If you are carrying a laptop bag or a tote and another carryon, then its a 2 bag system."


I'm trying to figure out how your Gate8 solution meets the above criteria. How is it any different from a two-bagger placing a small laptop bag into a standard rollaboard at various points in a trip for convenience and avoidance of airline fees?
Always@YVR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 5, 13, 11:14 am   #13
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Maryland
Programs: ET, SB, NSPA, OIL, AOR, DAOPA, HH
Posts: 393
Don't be confused. If you have enough space to stuff in your 2nd bag into the first after putting in 5 days worth of business clothes, you have ninja status as a one bagger.
arjunrc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 5, 13, 11:20 am   #14
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: YVR/YYZ/EWR/ATL/LHR/GLA
Programs: Air Canada Altitude S100k / Star Alliance Gold
Posts: 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by arjunrc View Post
Don't be confused. If you have enough space to stuff in your 2nd bag into the first after putting in 5 days worth of business clothes, you have ninja status as a one bagger.
Thanks. I am at peace LOL!
Always@YVR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 5, 13, 12:49 pm   #15
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 20
- Bag: Victorinox Standard Issue OR Victorinox Paratrooper
The Standard Issue is a 3-way carry, no wheels bag. It looks like a large laptop bag so I can get away with carrying it into meetings if required and it doesn't look awkward. Paratrooper is a tri-fold garmet bag. Not quite as inconspicuous, light, and versatile as the Standard Issue, but still an effective onebagger.

- Quart-size Ziploc bag
Yes, the one for your 3oz liquids. I pared down my entire toiletry kit to fit into this single bag.

- Technology
2 Smartphones, 1 tablet, 1 USB wall charger and cable (charges all devices), 1 spare battery for smartphones, 1-pair earbud headphones with microphone (doubles as handsfree headset), Kindle. That's it. I don't use any organizer doo-dads, I just use the organizer pockets in my luggage. Laptop stays behind now most of the time.

- 2 to 3 days worth of clothing
If the trip is 1 week, then I'm going to be washing clothes. Packed clothing has been carefully selected so to maximize versatility for trip settings and clothing outfit combinations.

- Disposability
Try to utilize disposable items where possible. That way if you lose the item, or you have to jettison stuff to make room for those unexpected extra materials you obtained during a meeting on your trip, it's no big deal. Disposable items are not limited just to things that are designed to be disposable, but may also be items that are inexpensive enough that you don't mind replacing them (i.e. inexpensive headphones vs. those expensive Bose models), or items old enough that you don't care if they make it home.

- Make use of things already in your surroundings
Why carry a travel pillow when you can use the ones provided by the airline or you can put a few pairs of your socks rolled into a t-shirt? Why carry tissues when every restroom around you has toilet paper and paper towels? Keep the extra napkins from the lunch you just bought at the terminal food court and stuff them in your pocket for later use. Why carry soap and shampoo when the hotel provides this stuff? You can live without your specialty products for a week. Just pay for a shoe shine or shave along the way instead of carrying shoe polish and a razor. Use the free plastic laundry bags in your hotel room for your dirty clothes instead of carrying a laundry bag. Obtain disposable drinks and water bottles instead of carrying a reusable bottle. Need earplugs? Just tear off a piece of the paper tissue you saved in your pocket. Once you really start looking for it, you'll be surprised what you can find in your immediate surroundings to solve your needs instead of having to carry stuff.

- KISS
Keep it simple. It's not difficult to do, just requires leaving behind most of the stuff you think you need (but you really don't) and only packing those items that have passed your careful scrutiny after being brutally honest with yourself about what you really need. Remember that worst case, if you find while on your trip there is something you really can't live without, just pull out your credit card and you can easily buy it at your destination. The trick to successfully carrying out a onebag carryon ninja trip has more to do with what you don't bring than what you do bring. Then, make the few items you do bring really count.
bonuspay is offline   Reply With Quote
 
 
Reply

Bookmarks


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 8:08 pm.