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Old Dec 23, 08, 7:20 pm   #1
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fostering a dog/travel

Mr. Kipper and I are probably going to foster a dog from Cobaka's old shelter. He's been there for 2 years, because he's very "shy." We know that if he isn't adopted/fostered soon, they're going to have no choice but to put him down, due to space, and we really don't want to see that happen. Hence, the fostering idea. The issues I'm anticipating are:
  1. His shelter is now 5 hours away from where we live. They're fine with this, figuring that the exposure he receives out here may make a difference, and convince someone out here to adopt him.
  2. Since he's so shy, when we go to pick him up, should I plan on riding in the backseat with him on the way back?
  3. How do we travel with 2 dogs, rather than one?
  4. We're supposed to be out of town for almost a week in January. My father is going to house-sit/dog-sit. Should I be concerned about leaving Geno for almost a week after we've only had him for two weeks? I don't worry about Cobaka--she'll love the quality time with Grandpa.

Thanks!
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Old Dec 23, 08, 10:18 pm   #2
 
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What a wonderful thing you are doing! I don't have experience fostering but have spoken to a few people who have and dealt with shelter dogs in general.

2) Some dogs take to riding in a car right away and Geno may be fine by himself. Some shelter dogs are routinely carted around in crates to adoption fairs so he may want to ride in a crate. The shelter should know. If neither of these, I would recommend riding with him in back, especially if he takes to you right away.

3) I've traveled with 2 dogs, no problem if they get along. They usually just find their own space in back. If they fight, all bets are off!

4) Shelter dogs have to adjust, unfortunately, to lots of different people. Being with a different person (Grandpa) may actually help him not attach to you so deeply that it would be difficult for him to adjust to his new forever family. If he gets socialized to new people, he may exhibit more outgoing behavior that will help him get adopted faster. It's not ideal but I would not worry about it.
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Old Dec 24, 08, 6:02 am   #3
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I'm hoping he takes to me. I'm thinking that if I ride in the back with him, it'll let him start to warm up to me.

Your point that Geno getting to know my father might be good for him never occurred to me. You're right though--it may be good for him.

We're hoping that my in-laws will hear what we're doing and will decide that perhaps he's the dog for them. At the same time, I know we can't count on it, and that Geno may be here for a while.

I did ask Mr. Kipper what we're going to do if Cobaka and Geno get very attached to each other. His comment was that it will take some adjusting on his part, but we'll deal.
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Old Dec 24, 08, 6:24 am   #4
 
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congratulations on your new family member

I have fostered with a rescue for years. Your questions are really good ones. First, the biggest mistake I see new foster parents make is by far allowing their dog and the foster frequent contact in the beginning. The foster dog needs to be integrated into the household very slowly. This is quite a tranisition for him. Hopefully, he has been crate trained. If so, he definitely needs to travel in his crate with familiar toys, etc with your dog not allowed to get close to his crate. When he arrives home, put him in a separate area of the house in his crate. Feed him separate from your dog. Just let him get used to the smells and go about your business as usual. Allow him the opportunity to be with just you or your husband and let him take the initiative regarding how much contact he wants. This will be especially important since you are going away. I'd suggest very minimal contact between the 2 dogs until you return. He'll do fine with your plans for care when you are away, as long as he is allowed his own space with limited contact with your dog.
This is hard for new parents with the excitement of adding a new "child"; however, I have seen placements not work because of this. Good luck and let me know if I can help.
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Old Dec 24, 08, 6:46 am   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hinsopa View Post
I have fostered with a rescue for years. Your questions are really good ones. First, the biggest mistake I see new foster parents make is by far allowing their dog and the foster frequent contact in the beginning. The foster dog needs to be integrated into the household very slowly. This is quite a tranisition for him. Hopefully, he has been crate trained. If so, he definitely needs to travel in his crate with familiar toys, etc with your dog not allowed to get close to his crate. When he arrives home, put him in a separate area of the house in his crate. Feed him separate from your dog. Just let him get used to the smells and go about your business as usual. Allow him the opportunity to be with just you or your husband and let him take the initiative regarding how much contact he wants. This will be especially important since you are going away. I'd suggest very minimal contact between the 2 dogs until you return. He'll do fine with your plans for care when you are away, as long as he is allowed his own space with limited contact with your dog.
This is hard for new parents with the excitement of adding a new "child"; however, I have seen placements not work because of this. Good luck and let me know if I can help.
You'll have PM very shortly!!! Thank you!!!

Mr. Kipper and I had discussed that it was time to bring up Cobaka's old crate, and set it up in the spare room, since we can keep the door closed when we're not there, and Cobaka won't be able to get in there.

I think we were more concerned about how Cobaka would react to him, but it sounds like he's the one with whom we need to be concerned.

Are we able to allow Cobaka, to see him when he's out of his crate, or should we basically not really let them see each other until after we get back?
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Old Jan 2, 09, 3:40 pm   #6
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Once we welcome Geno into our home, even temporarily, will we need to obtain a license for him? Will the shelter take care of that? Do we need one since he technically still belongs to the shelter? It's only $8/year or some such, so I don't mind taking care of it if he needs it.
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Old Jan 17, 09, 4:07 pm   #7
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Generally, shelters do not take care of that - it is usually the responsibility of the foster / adopter to purchase proper registration. But ask if the shelter makes any provision for fosters - IMO, the collar tag and rabies proof are still useful in case the dog wanders off. (Some dogs are certifiable escape artists - an architect friend had a boxer that climbed trees - Bob would come home and have to get his boxer off the roof! Just glad he never hit the wall or fence - he'd have been long gone.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by kipper View Post
Once we welcome Geno into our home, even temporarily, will we need to obtain a license for him? Will the shelter take care of that? Do we need one since he technically still belongs to the shelter? It's only $8/year or some such, so I don't mind taking care of it if he needs it.
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Old Jan 17, 09, 7:41 pm   #8
 
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Kipper, I can only share my experieince and hope it is of some help.

I just recently rescued a dog. He was in a boarding kennel, after many unsuccessful fostering. Before that breed rescue got him off of "dealth row" from a local "humane" society just in time. I brought him home myself and he loved being in the back seat (which he still does to this day).

I was only going to take him for a short time to get him out of the kennel situation. I was raised with dogs and had them most of my life, but now live alone and travel constantly. Well, what I was not prepared for how instantly Oscar bonded to me. He seemed to know that I was the one who was going to save him. Giving him up, was just not going to be an option. (He is an 85lb lap dog).

I just want to point it out in case this is not possible for you. I travelled the week after I got him and he went to stay with my folks and their 3 dogs. Of course, we were all in a panic to see how they all got along. After very brief "hello's", they all just sort of fell into place. So now he stays home with a dog/house sitter for short trips and goes to my folks for longer trips. He seems to adapt because he knows he is loved and is here forever.

Do you think you might want to keep Geno if all works out? Would your father want a dog?

You are doing a great thing by helping Geno and he will know it and will love you for it. Just make sure to give him enough space if he needs it (he might if he is shy). He may also be crate trained and enjoy being in there. Be sure to also let Cobaka know that he/she is still the "main dude", but his job is to be a great big brother/sister.

Hope all goes well......... Good luck!
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