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Old May 6, 11, 10:07 am   #1
 
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TSA and Expired ID

I know they will accept other forms to prove your identity. Does the birth certificate have to be an original or is a certified copy ok.
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Old May 6, 11, 10:57 am   #2
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I would strongly suggest that documents like birth certificates not be presented to TSA employees (and especially SSN cards).

You can still transit the checkpoint if your drivers license is expired beyond 12 months; they will ask you a series of questions to compare with publicly accessible databases (I imagine similar to confirming your identity over the phone when having your online password reset with a financial institution). Allow for some extra time, but anecdotal evidence suggests this can be a simple process.

Note that this should not be done if you actually do have have suitable ID such as a passport card, DL, or other listed on the TSA site. (I state this just for general info, not that I think this is the OP's intention).
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Old May 6, 11, 11:04 am   #3
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Birth certificates are not acceptable forms of ID for the TSA, they are not on the list, they do not have pictures, they do not meet many of the REAL ID requirements. A certified copy (commonly referred to as the short form) should be as good as the certified copy of the long form (commonly referred to as the original even though it too is a certified copy), but expect extra screening, as don't think it will matter much to them.
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Last edited by cordelli; May 6, 11 at 10:00 pm.
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Old May 6, 11, 11:23 am   #4
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Other folks have reported that, when they asked the TSA what they should do in lieu of ID that is listed on their website, they should bring documents like birth certificates, SSN cards, utility bills, etc. Just an all-around bad idea to supply a TSA worker with that kind of info.
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Old May 6, 11, 1:12 pm   #5
 
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I renewed my TX DL before it expired, and they gave me a paper temporary, but I did not get the new one in the mail before I flew for Thanksgiving. The TSA screener looked at me, and I said, yes, I know, I have a paper one if you want it. He said he couldn't care less and sent me on my way.

On my return the screener pointed it out to me, sort of in case I didn't know, but accepted the expired license.

Come to think of it, the only time I had to show the paper one was when I rented a car.
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Old May 6, 11, 1:39 pm   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cordelli View Post
A certified copy should be as good as the original. . .


The original is kept on file with the clerk, Dept of Health, registrar or the like-- the only thing you can get is a certified copy. They aren't going to give you the original from their files.
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Old May 6, 11, 1:44 pm   #7
 
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Originally Posted by cordelli View Post
Birth certificates are not acceptable forms of ID for the TSA, they are not on the list, they do not have pictures, they do not meet many of the REAL ID requirements. A certified copy should be as good as the original, but expect extra screening, as don't think it will matter much to them.


BC are acceptable forms of ID for TSA. However, TSA will take expired DL and passports expired up to one year.

I will add this, though: I recently saw a an airline refuse to issue a BP to a passenger because his ID was expired by a few months. TSA would not have had a problem with his ID, he would have made it through the checkpoint. The airline was Contiential.

So I now suggest to people to bring something, anything, BC, SS, etc, to help check in with the airline - if needed - to get your BP. And then present whatever you want to TSA.
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Old May 6, 11, 2:25 pm   #8
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Originally Posted by SATTSO View Post
BC are acceptable forms of ID for TSA. However, TSA will take expired DL and passports expired up to one year.
This only works if the TDC Clerk is informed of the procedure. On more than once occasion, we've heard from people that the clerk refused to let them use the expired ID. Why must it be so hard to train these people to accept an ID?!
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Old May 6, 11, 7:32 pm   #9
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I haven't had a problem using my expired driver's license (expired August 31, 2010) for a while now. I used it this morning at JFK. The rather pleasant, smiling woman TDC noted that my year is almost up. I agreed.

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Old May 6, 11, 9:59 pm   #10
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Originally Posted by Ari View Post


The original is kept on file with the clerk, Dept of Health, registrar or the like-- the only thing you can get is a certified copy. They aren't going to give you the original from their files.
Many people refer to a copy of the long form as the original, and the short little one as the certified copy. I was assuming they were asking long form vs short form, not the original to a copy.

I will edit the post to use the proper terms instead some of the common ones to avoid any confusion.
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Old May 7, 11, 5:57 am   #11
 
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Originally Posted by SATTSO View Post
BC are acceptable forms of ID for TSA. However, TSA will take expired DL and passports expired up to one year.
I think you're using "acceptable" in a different sense than a previous poster and possibly confusing things. Here's my understanding of the situation: please correct me if I'm wrong.

There is a set of "acceptable" ID's. That's the list we've all spoke about. Expired (less than one year) DL's are on the list. BC's are not. If one of those documents are presented, TDC has no discretion: the passenger must be permitted to continue.

If none of those ID's are present, what will happen next (as discussed here multiple times and seen in the Phil Mocek case) is that the passenger will be asked if they have anything with their name on it. That can be a BC, employee ID, credit card, check, etc. If such exists, TDC (possibly in consultation with a supervisor or other TSOs) can either process the passenger normally or make them a selectee (what I'm not clear about is if there's a third option here).

When a friend of mine had her wallet stolen, she made two roundtrips without an ID on the "acceptable" list. Each time (LGA/DL and PWM) she presented a few documents, including employee ID with picture and BC. All four times, TDC spent no longer with her than if she'd had ID, didn't consult anybody else, and she wasn't considered a selectee. She was told by some that her BC was the most important document they used, and got that sense from the others as well.

As to airlines, note that airlines tend to still use the old "government photo ID or two forms of ID, one of which must be issued by a state or local government". So BC + employee ID would have been OK with them too (though I advised her not to interact with any airline employees just in case), but an expired DL might not have been.
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Old May 7, 11, 9:39 am   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cordelli View Post
Many people refer to a copy of the long form as the original, and the short little one as the certified copy. I was assuming they were asking long form vs short form, not the original to a copy.

I will edit the post to use the proper terms instead some of the common ones to avoid any confusion.
Now I understand.

Thanks.
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Old May 7, 11, 9:53 am   #13
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Depending on the circumstances, including if or how many flags are present for similarly named people in the series of databases which can be checked, your situation could take anything from an extra 10 seconds to an extra 45-60 minutes. You may also encounter all kinds of problems -- whether by policy or simple bureaucracy -- for airline check-in, car rental, hotel rental, entry to secure buildings, use of your credit card at a store and the like. If you can possibly in any way avoid the situation, it's well worth the effort to either get your DL renewed or obtain your state's version of non-DL ID. It only takes one bad incident to really unravel a trip.
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Old May 7, 11, 12:31 pm   #14
 
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Originally Posted by Often1 View Post
Depending on the circumstances, including if or how many flags are present for similarly named people in the series of databases which can be checked, your situation could take anything from an extra 10 seconds to an extra 45-60 minutes. You may also encounter all kinds of problems -- whether by policy or simple bureaucracy -- for airline check-in, car rental, hotel rental, entry to secure buildings, use of your credit card at a store and the like.
There was no database lookup done in any of the four flights my friend took. As to credit card usage, it's a violation of the merchant agreement with Visa or Mastercard for a merchant to require identification. I can't find the web form to report this at the moment, but every time I've used it, the merchant changed their policy within a few days.
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Old May 7, 11, 2:41 pm   #15
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All of which is cold comfort when you have a hotel clerk with a third-grade education and it's 3:00 AM.
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