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Old Feb 8, 09, 2:40 am   #1
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Thumbs up [OLD FAQ THREAD] | Cathay Pacific FAQ thread: Everything you want to know about CX

Welcome to the FAQ thread on the CX experience. Here we aim to cover all your frequently asked queries about seating, aircraft types, what to expect from First and Business Class travel, Cathay's inflight entertainment system and much more! Refer to the contents below to skip to a section that interests you the most, or alternatively move through them all at your leisure.

Section 2 contains a comprehensive CX-specific guide of each CX outport. If you have a question about a specific flight, or a specific procedure relating to an airport, please check to make sure that your question has not been answered in section 2 before posting a general query.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
For information about which aircraft are equipped with the newest
Business Class product, please proceed directly to Section 1 (in particular 1.5)

Please do not ask whether your flight XXX on whatever date will be operated by a
Cirrus aircraft. This information is readily ascertainable by checking your booking
online or doing a dummy booking and looking at the seat map (as explained at 1.3).
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Please note that this is a read-only forum.
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Personal thanks go to B-HXB for starting the original FAQs on CathayTalk and agreeing to post a comprehensively updated version here; and to Top of climb for making periodic updates to the FAQs. Additional thanks go to QRC3288, kchika, pacificboot , cxfan1960, jumbojet19920711 and b-kpf for their contributions. Kudos to all !

Last edited by Guy Betsy; Jun 22, 11 at 12:56 pm.
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Old Nov 28, 10, 3:29 pm   #2
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 943
This FAQ thread is frequently updated, and the last updates made to this page was on:
13 May 2013

Changes made: Fleet, destinations update


These FAQs are based on those originally posted on CathayTalk. Thank you to the CathayTalk team for their original contributions, and to b-hqb for putting internet detective skills to good use in managing to find an archived page of those FAQs.

You can scroll down to read the relevant post, or use the direct hyperlinks to jump straight to the section in which you are interested.

***

Covered in this thread:

General overview of CX fleet and network
1. Introduction to the Cathay fleet (including information on aircraft retrofitting with new product)
2. List of product offerings by destination

Classes of travel
3. First Class ("FCL")
4. Business Class ("JCL")
5. Premium Economy Class
6. Economy Class ("YCL")

Travelling with CX
7. StudioCX: Inflight Entertainment
8. Upgrades
9. Lounges

Cathay Pacific Loyalty Programmes
10. Marco Polo Club
11. www.cathaypacific.com

Dragonair
12. Dragonair

Interline-Agreements
13. INTERLINE AGREEMENTS WITH OTHER AIRLINES

Last edited by Top of climb; May 13, 13 at 5:02 am. Reason: Hyperlinking and breakup of sections
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Old Nov 28, 10, 3:30 pm   #3
 
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1. Introduction to the Cathay fleet

For information about which aircraft are equipped with the newest Business Class product, please proceed directly to 1.4.

For information on CX equipment registration, new addition and retrofit status.

Flyer Guide:
* CX Fleet: http://www.flyerguide.com/wiki/index...%28CX%29_Fleet
* KA Fleet: http://www.flyerguide.com/wiki/index...air_(KA)_Fleet
FT Discussions:
New Regional Products for 772, 773 and regionally configured A330's
Re-fit Status, Long-haul Aircraft


QuickGlance at this section's questions
1.1 Equipment codes
1.2 Which of Cathay’s aircraft operate where?
1.3 What specific aircraft am I flying on (both aircraft type and product on that type)?
1.4 Retrofitting information



1.1 I’m looking at Cathay’s schedules and am puzzled by the references that appear under “Equipment”. What do all the different three letter alphanumeric codes mean?

After a systems update in February 2012, Cathay's schedules only display the IATA standard three letter alphanumeric codes for aircraft type (i.e. 744, 773, 772, 333, 343 and 77W) rather than Cathay's own three letter alphanumeric equipment codes. The table below lists Cathay's internal three letter equipment codes, together with a breakdown of the types of seats installed on that particular aircraft. For a more comprehensive explanation of the types of seats installed, please refer to the relevant sections of the FAQ thread (First Class, Business Class or Economy Class).

Code:
Code  Operates     First Class   Business Class   Premium Econ.  Economy Class
330   Regional     -             Regional         No             Standard
33G   Long Haul    -             Cirrus           Yes            Cradle
34B   Long Haul    -             Herringbone      No             Hard shell
34J   Long Haul    -             Herringbone      Yes            Hard shell(not opg)
74A   Long Haul    Suite         Herringbone      No             Hard shell
74K   Long Haul    Suite         Herringbone      Yes            Hard shell
772   Regional     No            Regional         No             Standard
773   Regional     No            Regional         No             Standard
77G   Long Haul    -             Cirrus           Yes            Cradle
77H   Long Haul    Suite         Cirrus           Yes            Cradle 
73Z   Regional     No            New Regional     No             Hard shell

1.2 Which of Cathay’s aircraft operate where?
We unofficially divide Cathay's aircraft into two types of product:
  • Long Haul (74A, 74K, 77G, 77H, 33G, 34B and 34J); and
  • Regional (330, 772, 773, 77Z).

We also unofficially divide Cathay's destination network into three zones:
  • Long Haul (Europe, North America, Australia, New Zealand);
  • Medium Haul (Middle East and India); and
  • Regional (rest of Asia).

From these categories, we present to you the three inviolable rules of CX aircraft deployment:

1. If you are flying to a Long Haul zoned destination, your flight will ALWAYS be operated by a Long Haul aircraft.
Cathay's online pages now all (unhelpfully) display the IATA-standard alphanumeric aircraft code rather than the CX alphanumeric configuration code (e.g. it displays 77W for 777-300ER operated flights instead of 77G or 77H). Following the system update in February 2012, there are also reports of some long haul flights wrongly displaying "773" as aircraft type. If this happens do not worry! Do not be fooled! Do not post a new thread asking whether you will be stuck on a regional 773! So long as you are flying to or from a Long Haul zoned destination your flight will ALWAYS be on a 777-300ER with Long Haul Product. Cathay's regional "773" has derated engines and it is simply physically impossible for them to fly to Europe or North America.

2. If you are flying to a Medium Haul zoned destination, the type of product on your flight will DEPEND on your specific destination and flight number.
Please consult section 2. Certain destinations are always served by Long Haul product, while other destinations might be served by Long Haul product on certain flights only. Generally these flights are "sticky", i.e. they are always scheduled to be operated by Long Haul products. However, unlike Long Haul destinations, these "sticky" Medium Haul zoned Long Haul product flights may sometimes, but rarely be subject to aircraft swaps to a Regional product due to operational requirements.

3. If you are flying to a Regional zoned destination, you may get EITHER a Regional product or a Long Haul product.
Certain regional destinations have "sticky" flights operated by Long Haul product; other regional destinations see Long Haul product on an ad hoc basis. Please see section 2 for more information on specific destinations.


1.3 I want to know what aircraft I'm flying on, but the timetables page of cathaypacific.com, and my Manage My Booking page, just gives the generic IATA three-character code (e.g. 333/77W/744), rather than 33G/77H/74K etc. Is it a Regional or Long Haul product aircraft, and if Long Haul how do I know whether it has Olympus or Cirrus seats, or whether it has First Class, or whether it has Premium Economy? Help!
You will need to do some light detective work, by looking at the seat map of the aircraft assigned to your flight. This can be done easily in one of two ways:

1. If you have an existing booking and are flying in Business Class, log in to Manage My Booking on cathaypacific.com. Pull up the seat map (select my seat) and look at the seat map (using the guide below) to ascertain the equipment currently assigned to your flight.

2. If you have not made a booking, or are travelling in Economy Class (and hence you do not have access to a JCL seat map) you can still use the purchases page to ascertain the configuration of the generic aircraft code you are given. The best way is to make a dummy booking for Business Class and then at the entry of traveller's details page to choose a seat, which will bring up the seat maps. The trick is to identify the layout: any aircraft which has more than two seats windowside (e.g. 2-2-2 or 2-3-2 configuration) in Business Class will be Regional product.

Be warned that aircraft switches between type are extremely common on regional flights, depending on maintenance requirements.



1.4 Retrofitting information
Keeping up with CX's retrofitting schedule can be exhausting.

All of the B777-300ER fleet, and all of the Long Haul A330-300 fleet, now feature the Cirrus Business Class product, Premium Economy and non-hard-shell seats in Economy. There are no more B777-300ER or A330-300 aircraft which feature the Olympus herringbone Business Class product (which can still be found on the 74A, 74K and 34B).

We expect retrofitting to be as follows:
  • 11 74A retrofitted to four-class 74K
  • All 34B retrofitted to three-class 34J

In these FAQs all reference to three-class aircraft is to a no-First J/W/Y configuration; and four-class to a F/J/W/Y configuration.

Due to their impending retirement from the fleet, the B747-400 and A340-300 aircraft will not be retrofitted with the Cirrus product. In other words, Cirrus seats will only be available on Cathay's B777-300ER and Long Haul A330-300 aircraft. However, the herringbone seats on the B747-400 and A340-300 fleet will have their seat covers refreshed to bring them aesthetically into line with the Cirrus colours.

Please see the post below to check the equipment that usually operates to your destination.

This is all the information we currently have on deployment. Please do not ask whether your flight XXX on whatever date will be operated by a Cirrus aircraft. This information is readily ascertainable by checking your booking online or doing a dummy booking and looking at the seat map (as explained above at 1.3). We reiterate that Cathay are well-reknowned for last-minute aircraft substitutions!

Last edited by sxc; Oct 31, 13 at 9:09 pm. Reason: Added equipment detail links
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Old Nov 28, 10, 3:30 pm   #4
 
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2. List of product offerings by destination

2.1 Which flights are currently scheduled to operate with what product?
Three-class destinations are identified in red and two-class destinations in blue. WARNING: Not all red-marked destinations offer First Class on all flights.

Destinations are ordered alphabetically.

a

Abu Dhabi
Flights: Three times weekly. CX687/8 operates once weekly HKG-AUH-RUH-HKG. CX647/8 operates twice weekly HKG-RUH-AUH-HKG.
Equipment: 33G.
Product: Long Haul (Cirrus).
Official designated lounge: Etihad First, Etihad Business lounges.
Other lounge options: None.

Adelaide
Flights: CX105/4 operates daily in a HKG-ADL-MEL-HKG pattern.
Equipment: 33G.
Product: Long Haul (Cirrus).
Cathay Pacific gate information: Single airbridge deploys to door 1L.
Official designated lounge: Qantas Club.
Other lounge options: None.

Amsterdam
Flights: CX271/0 operates non-stop daily.
Equipment: 34B.
Product: Long Haul (Olympus).
Cathay Pacific gate information: CX flights depart from G wing of Schiphol.
Official designated lounge: British Airways lounge.

Auckland
Flights: CX197/8 operates daily.
Equipment: 34B.
Product: Long Haul (Olympus).
Cathay Pacific gate information: CX splits roughly 50-50 between Pier A and Pier B. Single airbridges operate only on Pier A, usually to door 2L (1L is used on gates 2 and 7). Dual airbridges are available on Pier B (gates 15 and 16) but airbridge does not always operate for door 1L.
Official designated lounge: Air New Zealand lounge.
Other lounge options: Qantas Club lounge (F, J sections).
Fast Track: Premium passengers departing on CX flights may pre-clear passport control at the Qantas Premium Check-in Lobby (where the CX premium check-in desks are located). There are no fast track arrival facilities.
Metal neutral codeshare operates on this route: Effective February 2013, Cathay Pacific and Air New Zealand operates a metal neutral codeshare between Auckland and Hong Kong. In addition to services operated by CX on CX metal, NZ operates a daily service on their three-class (business, premium economy, economy) 777-200 metal (codeshared by CX as CX7401/7402). Air New Zealand's piece system (1, 2 or 3 bags x 23 kgs), rather than CX's normal weight allowance, applies to baggage checked on all services operated by Cathay Pacific between Auckland and Hong Kong.



b

Bahrain
Flights: Four times weekly. CX741/0 operates twice weekly HKG-BAH-RUH-HKG and CX743/2 operates twice weekly HKG-RUH-BAH-HKG.
Equipment: 33G.
Product: Long Haul (Cirrus).
Official designated lounge: Cathay Pacific lounge.
Other lounge options: None.

Bangkok
Flights: Many.
Equipment: Primarily regional aircraft with the odd long-haul aircraft here and there.
Product: Most flights operate primarily using Regional equipment, but may sometimes feature Long Haul (Olympus or Cirrus).
Limited availability of First Class: Available only where a three-class aircraft operates.
Cathay Pacific gate information: CX flights can depart from E, F or G pier of Suvarnabhumi. Dual airbridges operate and deploy to doors 1L, 2L.
Official designated lounge: Two Cathay Pacific F/J mixed lounges, on concourses D and G.
Other lounge options: QF/BA lounge, other oneworld lounges.
Fast Track: Premium passengers will be provided with a fast track pass for express passport control clearance.

Beijing
Flights: Two flights daily on CX metal: CX312/347 and CX390/1. In addition, Dragonair offers comprehensive daily non-stop coverage throughout the day.
Equipment: No consistency.
Product: Can be either Regional or Long Haul.
Cathay Pacific gate information: All CX and KA flights operate from Terminal 3E, which is connected to the check-in and baggage reclaim areas in terminal 3C by automated shuttle train. Dual airbridges operate and deploy to doors 1L, 2L.
Official designated lounge: Cathay Pacific/Dragonair lounge.
Other lounge options: None.
Fast Track: None.

Brisbane
Flights: Eleven weekly service. CX103/146 operates daily, three times as HKG-CNS-BNE-HKG and four times as HKG-BNE-CNS-HKG. CX156/7 operates non-stop four times weekly.
Equipment: 33G.
Product: Long Haul (Cirrus).
Cathay Pacific gate information: Single airbridge operates and normally deploy to door 1L.
Official designated lounge: Qantas Club.
Other lounge options: None.



c

Cairns
Flights: CX103/146 operates daily, three times as HKG-CNS-BNE-HKG and four times as HKG-BNE-CNS-HKG.
Equipment: 33G.
Product: Long Haul (Cirrus).
Cathay Pacific gate information: Single airbridge operates and deploys to door 1L.

Cebu
Flights: CX921/0 operates daily.
Equipment: Can be either Regional or Long Haul.
Product: Varies between Regional, Long Haul (Olympus) and Long Haul (Cirrus). Please consult schedules.

Chennai
Flights: CX631/2 operates daily.
Equipment: 33G.
Product: Long Haul (Cirrus).

Chicago
Flights: CX806/7 operates daily.
Equipment: 77H.
Product: Long Haul (Cirrus).
Official designated lounge: SWISS lounge.
Other lounge options: None.
Cathay Pacific gate information: Flights will arrive in and out of the International Terminal (T5).

Colombo
Flights: Daily one-stop service: four times weekly via Singapore and three times weekly via Bangkok.
Equipment: 773.
Product: Regional.



d

Denpasar
Flights: CX785/4 operates non-stop daily.
Equipment: 74A/74K/772/773 mix.
Product: Long Haul (Olympus) or Regional, depending on aircraft operating.

Delhi
Flights: CX695/4 operates nonstop daily. CX751/708 operates daily via Bangkok in both directions.
Equipment: 33G (CX695/4); 330 (CX751/708).
Product: Long Haul (Cirrus) for CX695/4; Regional for CX751/708.
Official designated lounge: Premium Lounge.
Other lounge options: None.

Dubai
Flights: 2 flights daily: CX731/8 operates non-stop; CX745/6 operates non-stop with continuation to Jeddah.
Equipment: 33G.
Product: Long Haul (Cirrus).
Cathay Pacific gate information: CX flights depart from terminal 1 of the Shiekh Rashid terminal. Dual airbridges operate and deploy to doors 1L, 2L. There is a risk of being bussed to a remote stand.



f

Frankfurt
Flights: CX289/8 operates non-stop daily.
Equipment: 74K.
Product: Long Haul (Olympus) with Premium Economy.
Official designated lounge: Cathay Pacific lounge.
Other lounge options:
Cathay Pacific gate information: CX flights depart from E wing of Frankfurt's Terminal 2. Dual airbridges operate and deploy to doors 1L, 2L.

Fukuoka
Flights: CX510/1 operates daily via Taipei.
Equipment: Primarily regional aircraft, although long-haul aircraft may occasionally operate.
Product: No consistency. Depends on aircraft operating.


h

Ho Chi Minh City
Flights: Two flights daily: CX767/6 and CX765/4.
Equipment: Primarily regional aircraft although long-haul aircraft may occasionally operate.
Product: No consistency. Depends on aircraft operating.



j

Jakarta
Flights: Three flights daily: CX777/6, CX719/8 and CX797/8.
Equipment: Mix.
Product: Usually Regional but sometimes Long Haul.
Cathay Pacific gate information: CX flights depart from D wing of the international terminal. Dual airbridges operate and deploy to doors 1L, 2L.

Jeddah
Flights: CX745/6 operates daily via Dubai in both directions.
Equipment: 33G.
Product: Long Haul (Cirrus).

Johannesburg
Flights: CX749/8 operates non-stop daily.
Equipment: 74K/34B mix.
Product: Long Haul (Olympus).


k

Karachi
Flights: CX703/2700 operates four times weekly via Bangkok.
Equipment: 330.
Product: Regional.

Kuala Lumpur
Flights: Four flights daily: CX723/2, CX725/4, CX729/0 and CX791/0.
Equipment: Varies.
Product: No consistency (except CX729/0 is always Regional). Product for CX723/2 and CX725/4 depends on aircraft operating.
Official designated lounge: Cathay Pacific lounge.
Other lounge options: None.
Cathay Pacific gate information: CX flights normally depart from gates C32 and C34 of the satellite terminal of KLIA. All passengers must take the shuttle train to and from the Main Terminal Building for passport control clearance.
Fast Track: Passes will be provided to premium passengers for fast track clearance.



l

London
Flights: 4 flights non-stop daily (CX251/0, CX253/4, CX255/2 and CX257/6).
Equipment: 77H (CX251/0 and CX253/4); 74K (CX255/2); 77G (CX257/6).
Product: Long Haul (Cirrus) for all flights operated by 77H; Long Haul (Olympus) for all flights operated by 74K. All flights have Premium Economy.
Official designated lounge: Cathay Pacific lounge (F, J sections).
Other lounge options: British Airways lounge; American Airlines lounge.
Cathay Pacific gate information: CX flights normally depart from Pier 6 (gates 13-22) of Terminal 3. Flights sometimes also depart from Piers 5 (gates 1-7) or 7 (gates 23-42). Gates at piers 5 and 6 (with the exception of gates 13 and 22), and gate 42, have dual airbridges deploying to doors 1L, 2L. Gates 13, 22 and 32-40 have single airbridges deploying to door 2L only.
Fast Track: Passes will be provided to arriving premium passengers for fast track clearance. There is a fast track lane for departing premium passengers; accessible by showing your boarding pass.
Upcoming equipment change: From 30 June 2013, a fifth daily flight (CX237,9/8) will be added using a no-First three-class 77G. Also, from 28 October 2013, CX255/2 will be replaced by a 77H three days a week, with the 74K remaining on the other four days.

Los Angeles
Flights: CX880/1 operates non-stop daily. CX882/3 operates non-stop daily. CX884/5 operates six times weekly.
Equipment: 77H.
Product: Long Haul (Cirrus) with Premium Economy.
Official designated lounge: oneworld lounge.
Other lounge options: None.
Cathay Pacific gate information: CX flights depart and arrive from the TBIT. Single airbridges operate and deploy to door 2L.


m

Manila
Flights: 37 flights weekly, consisting of five daily flights plus one flight that operates twice-weekly.
Equipment: Many flights that do not utilise an aircraft required to overnight in Manila (ie flights not having late afternoon departures from HKG or early morning departures from MNL) operate with a 74A/74K or 77G/77H. Please consult schedules.
Product: Long Haul (Olympus)/Long Haul (Cirrus)/Regional mix.
Limited availability of First Class: Available only where a three-class aircraft operates this route.
Cathay Pacific gate information: CX flights operate from terminal 1.

Melbourne
Flights: 3 flights daily: CX135/4 nonstop, CX163/8 nonstop, CX105/4 HKG-ADL-MEL-HKG.
Equipment: 33G.
Product: Long Haul (Cirrus).
Official designated lounge: Cathay Pacific lounge.
Other lounge options: Qantas First, Business lounges.
Cathay Pacific gate information: CX flights can depart from any gate in Melbourne's International terminal (T2). Generally it will operate from a single airbridge gate deploying to door 1L.
Fast Track: Passes will be provided to premium passengers for fast track clearance.

Milan
Flights: CX233/4 operates daily.
Equipment: 77H.
Product: Long Haul (Cirrus).

Moscow DME
Flights: CX 206/7 operates three times weekly.
Equipment: 34B.
Product: Long Haul (Olympus).

Mumbai
Flights: CX685/4 operates non-stop daily. CX709/750 operates three-times weekly via Bangkok.
Equipment: 33G for CX685/4. Regional aircraft for CX709/750.
Product: Long Haul (Cirrus) for CX685/4. Regional for CX709/750.


n

Nagoya
Flights: CX530/1 operates daily via Taipei, CX532/3 and CX536/9 operates nonstop daily.
Equipment: Primarily regional aircraft.
Product: No consistency. Depends on aircraft operating.
Official designated lounge: Centrair Global Lounge (by gate 19).
Cathay Pacific gate information: Dual airbridges operate.
Fast Track: None.

New York JFK
Flights: 25 flights weekly : CX830/1 and CX840/1 operates non-stop daily. CX888/9 operates daily via Vancouver in both directions. CX846/5 operates non-stop four times a week.
Equipment: 77H.
Product: Long Haul (Cirrus).
Official designated lounge: British Airways lounge (F, J sections). First Class passengers on CX (NOT OW emerald not travelling in First Class) are entitled to access the British Airways Club World Preflight Supper Room when the room is open during the evening.
Other lounge options: None.
Cathay Pacific gate information: CX flights depart from Terminal 7 (British Airways terminal) at JFK. Single airbridge operates and deploys to door 2L.
Vancouver stopover information for passengers travelling HKG-YVR-JFK on CX888 or JFK-YVR-HKG on CX889: Passengers travelling JFK-YVR-HKG must remain on the aircraft in Vancouver. Passengers travelling HKG-YVR-JFK are required to deplane in Vancouver into a secure holding room while the aircraft is security swept to comply with United States Department of Homeland Security requirements for inbound flights. All passengers re-boarded at YVR will be subject to hand luggage search to comply with US DHS requirements.
Fast Track: Departing passengers may use the British Airways fast track security channel located behind the premium check in area.



o

Osaka
Flights: 4 flights daily: CX506/7, CX566/7 and CX502/3 operate non-stop, and CX564/5 operates via Taipei in both directions.
Equipment: Mix. CX506/7 primarily operates with a Long Haul 74A/74K or 77H.
Product: Long Haul on CX506/7. Otherwise Regional.
Official designated lounge: Pacific Lounge (by gate 11).
Other lounge options: JAL lounge (South Wing by gate 30).
Limited availability of First Class: Only available when a long-haul aircraft is scheduled to operate. Please consult schedules.
Cathay Pacific gate information: CX flights depart from the North Wing of the international terminal. Dual airbridges operate and deploy to doors 1L, 2L.
Fast Track: None.



p

Paris CDG
Flights: 2 flights daily: CX261/0 and CX279/8.
Equipment: 77H (CX261/0): 34B (CX279/8).
Product: Long Haul (Cirrus) for CX261/0; Long Haul (Olympus) for CX279/8.
Official designated lounge: Cathay Pacific lounge (F, J sections).
Other lounge options: American Airlines lounge.
Cathay Pacific gate information: CX flights normally depart from the satellite wing of Terminal 2A, which links to the main part of terminal 2A via an enclosed skybridge. Dual airbridges operate and deploy to doors 1L, 2L.
Fast Track: Passes will be provided to departing premium passengers for fast track clearance.
Limited availability of First Class and Premium Economy: First Class and Premium Economy is only available on CX261/0.

Penang
Flights: Ten times weekly. CX693/2 operates non-stop daily. CX633/4 operates three times weekly.
Product: Mix.
Cathay Pacific gate information: Single airbridges operate and normally deploy to door 1L.
Fast Track: None.

Perth
Flights: Ten flights weekly. CX171/0 operates daily. CX137/6 operates three times weekly.
Equipment: 33G.
Product: Long Haul (Cirrus).
Cathay Pacific gate information: Single airbridges operate and normally deploy to door 1L.
Fast Track: None.


r

Riyadh
Flights: Daily service. There is non-stop service HKG-RUH four times weekly (CX647 and CX743) and non-stop service RUH-HKG three times weekly (CX687 and CX741). On the days there is no non-stop service, there is one-stop service via either Abu Dhabi or Bahrain.
Equipment: 33G (all flights).
Product: Long Haul (Cirrus).

Rome
Flights: CX293/2 operates six times weekly.
Equipment: 34B.
Product: Long Haul (Olympus).
Cathay Pacific gate information: CX flights park at the C satellite, which is linked to the main international terminal by a shuttle train. Dual airbridges operate and deploy to doors 1L, 2L.
Fast Track: None.


s

San Francisco
Flights: CX872/3 operates non-stop daily. CX870/9 operates non-stop daily.
Equipment: 77H (CX872/3); 74K (CX870/9).
Product: Long Haul (Cirrus) for CX872/3; Long Haul (Olympus) for CX870/9.
Official designated lounge: Cathay Pacific lounge.
Tech stop warning: Flights operated by the 74K may need to make a technical stop en route from San Francisco to Hong Kong due to heavy head winds.
Cathay Pacific gate information: CX flights park at the A wing of the international terminal (normally gate A3). Dual airbridges operate and deploy to doors 1L, 2L.
Fast Track: No Fast Track arrivals. There is a Fast track lane for departure security screening, on the right hand side of the entrance to the A gates checkpoint. First and Business Class passengers should show their boarding pass for access.

Sapporo
Flights: CX580/1 operates daily.
Equipment: 74A/K (sold as two-class).
Product: Long Haul (Olympus).
Extra winter flights: During the winter ski season, CX580/1 operates daily. Also, year-round, additional charter flights may operate.
Cathay Pacific gate information: CX flights operate from the new international terminal at New Chitose Airport. Dual airbridges operate.
Fast Track: None.

Seoul
Flights: Six flights daily, four of which are nonstop and one of which operates via Taipei.
Equipment: Primarily regional aircraft.
Product: No consistency. Depends on aircraft operating.
Limited availability of First Class: Only available when a long-haul aircraft is scheduled to operate. Please consult schedules.
Cathay Pacific gate information: CX flights park at the Concourse A satellite, which is linked to the main international terminal by a shuttle train. Dual airbridges operate and deploy to doors 1L, 2L.

Shanghai Pudong
Flights: Three CX flights daily, in addition to a number of KA flights daily (including a daily KA flight to Shanghai Hongqiao).
Equipment: Primarily regional aircraft, although long-haul aircraft are sometimes utilised.
Product: No consistency. Depends on aircraft operating.
Official designated lounge: Cathay Pacific Dragonair lounge.
Other lounge options: None.
Cathay Pacific gate information: CX flights operate from terminal 2. Dual airbridges operate and deploy to doors 1L, 2L.
Fast Track: None.

Singapore
Flights: Many flights daily.
Equipment: Primarily regional aircraft, although long-haul aircraft are sometimes utilised.
Product: No consistency. Depends on aircraft operating.
Official designated lounge: Skyview Lounge.
Other lounge options: BA/QF lounge.
Limited availability of First Class: Only available when a long-haul aircraft is scheduled to operate. Please consult schedules.
Cathay Pacific gate information: CX flights operate from terminal 1. Dual airbridges operate and deploy to doors 1L, 2L.
Fast Track: None.

Surabaya
Flights: CX781/0 operates daily.
Equipment: Anything except a 74A/K.
Product: No consistency. Depends on aircraft operating.

Sydney
Flights: CX101/0, CX111/0, CX139/8 and CX161/2 all operate daily.
Equipment: 33G (all flights).
Product: Long Haul (Cirrus).
Cathay Pacific gate information: CX flights normally park at gates 30-37 of the A/B pier of the international terminal. Single airbridge operates and normally deploys to door 1L.
Fast Track: Passes will be provided to premium passengers for fast track clearance.
Official designated lounge: Qantas First, Business lounges.
Other lounge options: None.



t

Taipei
Flights: Too many to list.
Equipment: Primarily regional aircraft with the odd long-haul aircraft here and there. Product: No consistency. Depends on aircraft operating.
Official designated lounge: Cathay Pacific lounge (F, J sections).
Other lounge options: None.
Limited availability of First Class: Available only where a three-class aircraft operates this route. Please consult schedules.
Cathay Pacific gate information: CX flights park at B pier. Dual airbridges operate and deploy to doors 1L, 2L.
Fast Track: None.

Tokyo Haneda (HND)
Flights: Two non-stop flights daily. Note that CX also operates five daily flights to Tokyo Narita.
Equipment: 74A/74K.
Product: Long Haul (Olympus).
Cathay Pacific gate information: CX flights operate from the new international terminal. Dual airbridges operate and deploy to doors 1L, 2L.

Tokyo Narita (NRT)
Flights: Five flights daily. All operate non-stop except for CX450/1 which operate as a one-stop via Taipei. Note that CX also operates two daily flights to Tokyo Haneda.
Equipment: Primarily regional aircraft with the odd long-haul aircraft here and there.
Product: No consistency. Depends on aircraft operating.
Limited availability of First Class: Available only where a three-class aircraft operates this route. Please consult schedules.
Cathay Pacific gate information: CX flights operate from terminal 2 (both the main pier and the satellite). Dual airbridges operate and deploy to doors 1L, 2L.
Fast Track: Available with invitation given at check-in.

Toronto
Flights: 10 flights weekly: CX826/9 operates daily and CX828/5 operates three times weekly.
Equipment: 77G (all flights).
Product: Long Haul (Cirrus).
Official designated lounge: KLM Crown Lounge.
Other lounge options:
Cathay Pacific gate information: CX flights operate from C wing of terminal 3. Single airbridge operates and deploys to door 2L.


v

Vancouver
Flights: CX888/9 operates non-stop daily. CX838/7 operates non-stop daily.
Equipment: 77H (CX888/9); 77G (CX838/7).
Product: Long Haul (Cirrus).
Limited availability of First Class: First Class is only available on CX888/9.
Cathay Pacific gate information: CX888 to JFK normally parks at a single airbridge gate which goes to door 2L. All other flights usually park at a dual airbridge gate. Passengers travelling YVR-JFK on CX888 will not be permitted to enter the secure gate hold room until transit HKG-YVR-JFK passengers have been re-boarded.
Fast Track: None.
Official designated lounge: Cathay Pacific lounge (F, J sections).
Other lounge options:

Last edited by Top of climb; May 14, 13 at 4:00 am.
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Old Nov 28, 10, 3:31 pm   #5
 
Join Date: May 2010
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3. First Class

First Class is only available on the following long-haul aircraft configurations, and there is only ONE type of First Class seat:

Olympus seats (suites)
74A, 74K, 77H

Note that even though your regional flight may be operated by a three-class long-haul aircraft, First Class may not be sold. See section 4.3 for information about how to get a First Class seat on a Business Class ticket in these circumstances.


QuickGlance at this section's questions
3.1 Is there any difference between First Class suites and service on the 77H series versus the 74A/74K?
3.2 What are the notable features of the new Olympus First Class suite?
3.3 Which are the best First Class seats?
3.4 What amenities are provided in First Class?
3.5 What are my dining options in First Class?
3.6 Which flights have caviar service?



3.1 Is there any difference between First Class suites and service on the 77H (777-300ER) series versus the 74A/74K (747-400)?
No. As between the Olympus First Class suites, they are the same across both types of aircraft.

There has been spirited debate about the merits of the 777-300ER First Class cabin in comparison to the 747. Generally, the consensus appears to be that there is no beating the privacy and spaciousness of the nose area on the 747, and the spacious (windowed) toilets on the 747 compared to the 777-300ERs.


3.2 What are the notable features of the new Olympus First Class suite?
A full rundown of the seat can be found on the Cathay Pacific website, which even offers a virtual tour. You can expect the usual bells and whistles: a full-flat bed, a (narrowish) buddy seat so you can dine with someone else in the cabin, duvet and bed making service etc. Each seat also has a personal closet in which you can hang your clothes/jacket, store your shoes and where your sleep pad and duvet are stored.

Unlike other airlines, the seats do not have doors but the design of the shell around the seat means that once seated in your suite, you have to make a considerable effort to see what other people are doing in the seats around you. This makes it very easy for the crew to suddenly appear without you ever being aware of them approaching!

All overhead lockers have been removed from Olympus F cabins. There is space for your carry-on luggage underneath the buddy seat.

Arguably the best feature on the 747 aircraft are the spacious toilets located behind each of doors 1L and 1R.


3.3 Which are the best First Class seats?
Opinions vary but here is a quick rundown on the pros and cons.

74A
1A, 1K
Most private (least foot traffic). Probably the best seats for couples as there are no paired seats in the 74A or 74K cabin. Note that due to space constraints, the PTV in these seats must be latched to one side for taxi, takeoff and landing.

2A, 2K
Widest separation between seats. Not a lot of foot traffic.

3A, 3K
Similar to 2A and 2K. However, rather than having empty space between the seats, the credenza in front of 4D forms a ‘barrier’ between 3A and 3K.

4A, 4K
Bassinet seats and closest to the galley.

4D
The only seat in the cabin without a window. Note that the PTV must be latched to one side for taxi, takeoff and landing.

77H
1A, 1K, 2A and 2K are essentially the same seat. Similarly 1D and 2D are similar to each other.

Row 1 is obviously closer to the galley so may be slightly noisier during meal times. Note that although labelled “D” seats, the egress for suites 1D and 2D are actually on the right-hand aisle (i.e. the same aisle as 1K and 2K). This means that theoretically 1A and 2A should have less foot traffic. However, anecdotal evidence suggests that this is compensated for by cabin crew using the left-hand aisle when they need to access the forward galley.


3.4 What amenities are provided in First Class?
In long haul First Class, passengers are provided with an amenity kit and a Shanghai Tang pyjama kit (with slippers and eyeshade). The amenity kits contain three or four small tubes of lotions and lip balm (exact details of which depend on the gender of the kit), and a toothbrush, toothpaste, mouthwash and comb.

Duvets will be given, often along with an offer to make up your bed with a mattress underlay, usually after the first meal service. The crew will of course be happy to do this earlier on request. Lambswool blankets are also available on request.

Water bottles are automatically provided after the first meal service for passengers on long-haul flights.


3.5 What are my dining options in First Class?
There is considerable flexibility in First Class and indeed the menu invites you to dine whenever you wish. This means that you should not feel compelled to dine the “traditional” way (right after departure and a couple of hours before landing) if you do not want to. Simply inform the cabin crew of your dining preferences. As an example, if your flight leaves at 4:30 pm, you might choose to defer the first meal service until three hours into the flight as a “dinner” service. Alternatively, you might wish to have something from the second meal for your first meal, or vice versa. This flexibility is obviously more difficult to deliver on shorter flights.

This thread contains First Class menu transcripts for recent flights.

On Olympus aircraft, you have the option of dining with another person seated in the FCL cabin in the suite’s buddy seat. However, you may not invite someone else from a lower cabin, so please do not ask.


3.6 Which flights have caviar service?
Caviar is offered on long-haul first class flights with the exception of the following flights: CX888 (YVR-JFK leg) and CX889 (JFK-YVR leg) or on any short or medium haul regional flights. Please note the change to CX889 JFK-YVR-HKG which used to serve caviar ex-JFK and not ex-YVR - this has now changed to serving caviar ex-YVR and not ex-JFK.

Last edited by Top of climb; May 13, 13 at 5:10 am.
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Old Nov 28, 10, 3:43 pm   #6
 
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4. Business Class

Business Class is available on all aircraft. However, the exact Business Class product will depend on the type and configuration of aircraft. Blue text below is hyperlinked.

Cirrus seats (bed seats in a \\ //\\ // layout)
33G, 77G, 77H

Olympus seats (bed seats in a herringbone // \\// \\ (Boeing) or // \\ \\ (Airbus) layout)
34B, 34J, 74A, 74K

Regional Business Class (“ORBC”) seats
330, 772, 773

Refreshed Regional Business Class (“RRBC”) seats
330, 773 (selected aircraft only). See 4.1 below.

New Regional Business Class 2013 (“NRBC”) seats
330, 772, 77Z (retrofit progressing through 2013 and 2014). See 4.1 below.
[/b]


!SEARCHING THE FORUM USING THE TERMS "MINI CABIN", "DORM ROOM", "UPSTAIRS" OR "UPPER DECK" (or a combination thereof) will bring up some very useful threads where the merits of the various Business Class products and layouts have been discussed to death. As the search terms suggest, in addition to providing information generally on Business Class product, it also contains information specific about which Business Class cabin to sit in on those aircraft which have more than one cabin (i.e. upstairs vs downstairs on the 74A/K; forward vs rear cabin on the 33G/77G/77H). You may wish to run this search before starting a new thread!


QuickGlance at this section's questions
4.1 Introduction to the different type of Business Class seats
4.2 Will my flight have long-haul (flat bed) Business Class ?
4.3 Can I get a seat in the F section if my two-class flight is being operated by a three-class aircraft?
4.4 Which are the best Business Class seats?
4.5 What seats are best for couples? For families?
4.6 Why do people hate the current "Olympus" flat bed product so much?
4.7 What amenities are offered in Business Class?
4.8 How are meals served in Business Class?



4.1 Introduction to the different Business Class products across the "regional" and "long-haul" fleet
There are two broad classes of Business Class in the Cathay Pacific fleet: (i) long-haul; and (ii) regional. From a Business Class perspective, the major difference is that long-haul aircraft are equipped with AVOD and either electronically controlled lie-flat or full-flat bed seats, whereas regional aircraft are equipped with cradle-style seats with a 45" seat pitch and PTVs with no AVOD capability. (Although note that the New Regional Business Class, being progressively introduced throughout 2013 and 2014, will feature AVOD).

Long-haul JCL
Long-haul Business Class is exclusively served by aircraft equipped with the Cirrus or Olympus long-haul product. Both feature a comprehensive Audio Video On Demand (AVOD) system and fully flat beds, although the configuration differs somewhat.

Regional JCL
Regional Business Class is subdivided into three types: (i) Oldest Regional Business Class (ORBC); (ii) Refreshed Regional Business Class ("RRBC"); and (ii) New Regional Business Class (NRBC):
  • ORBC is fitted on the majority of regional aircraft and feature manually-controlled cradle seats.
  • RRBC is fitted on four A330-300 aircraft (B-HLU, HLV, LAA and LAB); and five B777-300 aircraft (B-HNM through HNQ). These seats are electronically controlled cradle seats, feature a larger 9” PTV and are generally a “refresh” of the ORBC design. Some passengers have complained that the RRBC seats have harder seat cushioning than ORBC. Please note that prior to the introduction of the New Regional Business Class in 2013, this board referred to the RRBC product as New Regional Business Class (or NRBC). Therefore, in threads dated pre-mid-2012 (when CX announced the proper NRBC retrofit), references to NRBC are actually to RRBC.
  • NRBC is replacing ORBC and RRBC through a retrofit programme of all of Cathay's regional aircraft. Retrofit commenced in 2013 with a 777-300, B-HNP, and will continue through to the end of 2014.

There is no differentiation in the CX system between ORBC and RRBC aircraft; and accordingly there is no way of telling by which your flight will be operated, short of looking out the window at the plane and noting its registration. NRBC aircraft have less seats in the Business Class cabin and so the seat map will be different to ORBC/RRBC aircraft. You can check the Business Class seat map for your flight using the method outlined in section 1 above.


4.2 Will my flight have long-haul Business Class?
All long-haul flights are operated by aircraft equipped with the Cirrus or Olympus long-haul product. As noted above, all B747-400 and A340-300 aircraft have the Olympus Business Class seat. All B777-300ER and all Long Haul A330-300 have the Olympus product. Long Haul A330-300 aircraft are deployed to all services to Australia and the Middle East and India (which are considered by CX internally to be quasi-long haul outports in respect of product).

In addition, Long Haul aircraft may deploy on certain short-haul routes. However, the majority of short-haul flights are operated by the regional two-class A330-300 and B777 fleet, the majority of which are fitted with the Regional Business Class product as discussed above.


4.3 I am travelling Business Class on a two-class (J/Y) flight being operated by a three-class (F/J/Y) aircraft. Can I get a seat in the First Class cabin?
Generally you require some sort of Marco Polo elite status or oneworld elite status although anecdotal evidence has suggested that if you are on a oneworld RTW ticket in First, that may suffice. Previously if you fell into one of these categories you would be able to reserve a seat in the F section at time of booking, but it appears that CX control are now keeping F seats blocked for assigning at checkin.

You can try requesting these seats at time of booking - if you can get them, great; if you can't, try at the airport.

Part of the reason why CX will only allocate these seats to its frequent flyers is that while the food is still Business Class, the crew usually close the curtains between the cabins and there is a dedicated crew tending to the F section. In short, while it is not marketed as such, there is an element of better service in the F cabin even though it is strictly sold as J.

Please note that the F cabin will only open for seating on two-class flights if Business Class passengers cannot be accommodated in the normal Business Class cabin.


4.4 Which are the best Business Class seats?
Again, opinions vary.

(A) Olympus product* (please see 4.6 below for general comments about the Olympus JCL seat)

74A/74K
The new herringbone layout essentially eliminates any advantages the previous configuration had with respect to legroom etc. The generic rule is that upper deck is preferable to lower deck and seats away from the galley are preferable to seats near the galley and lavatories. Please note that all 747-400s feature the new expanded overhead lockers, although restrictions may still apply in respect of the size of your carry-on luggage. Refer to the Cathay Pacific website for more details.


34B/34J
All seats are located in Zone A between doors 1 and 2. Row 11 is located closest to the forward galleys and lavatory (in particular note 11K’s proximity to the lavatory).

The configuration in Business Class is 1-1-1. The egress for the centre D seats is to the left-hand aisle (i.e. same as for A seats). This may theoretically result in less foot traffic on the right-hand aisle, but there have been reports that the crew tend to increase their use of the right-hand aisle when passing up and down the cabin.


(B) Cirrus product

33G
There are two cabins - rows 11-18 in Zone A between doors 1 and 2; and rows 19-22 in Zone B just behind door 2. The second cabin is smaller but there will be foot traffic from Economy Class passengers during door 2 boarding.

Row 18 is missing a window.


77G
Row 19 is missing both windows.


77H
There are two cabins; a main cabin in Zone B between doors 2 and 3 consisting of rows 15-26 and a smaller "mini-cabin" forward of doors 2 and behind the First Class cabin consisting of rows 11-12. Some like the quiet and privacy of the mini-cabin; while others prefer the spaciousness of the main Business Class cabin.

Note missing windows on the 77H as follows:
  • 15A is missing both windows.
  • 16K is missing one window.
  • 21AK is missing the window nearest the pax's head.
  • 24AK is missing the window nearest the pax's feet.


(C) Refreshed & Regional Business Class

Note that only the seats differ between RRBC and ORBC aircraft. The configuration across both products is identical for any particular aircraft type.

330
All seats are located in Zone A between doors 1 and 2. Row 11 is located closest to the forward galleys and lavatory. Note that 11DG and 11HK are respectively adjacent to and right behind a lavatory, and that often people from the left-hand aisle will “shortcut” across the legroom of 11DG to access the right-hand lavatory in front of 11HK.

772
All seats are located in Zone A between doors 1 and 2. The galley is located on the right-hand side of the aircraft forward of row 11. Due to the curve of the bulkhead, 11D has extra legroom for the left leg.

773
The Busines Class cabin is located in Zone A between doors 1 and 2. The main Business Class galley is located on the right-hand side of the aircraft forward of row 11. Due to the curve of the bulkhead, 11D has extra legroom for the left leg. The 773 formerly had a mini-cabin of 14 seats behind doors 2, but as of January 2010, this space has been reconfigured to install extra economy seats.


(D) New Regional Business Class

There are two CX aircraft with New Regional Business Class in operation. This is a holding section pending first hand experience with the NRBC product (although we expect the general footprint, e.g. first row to be row 11, the cabin to be contained in Zone A etc. to be the same as the ORBC/RRBC product).

330
All seats are located in Zone A between doors 1 and 2.

772
All seats are located in Zone A between doors 1 and 2.

77Z
The Business Class cabin is located in Zone A between doors 1 and 2.


4.5 What are the best seats for couples on an Olympus fitted aircraft? What about seats for families travelling with young children?
One of the major criticisms about the new Olympus herringbone design is the fact that it is impossible to travel with someone else in the way that a traditional forward-facing configuration allows.

The best compromise is for couples to take adjacent (rather than opposite) seats (eg 20G and 21G as opposed to 20G and 20K). This will allow at least one person to lean on the divider and have a quick chat during the flight. Visitors may also be entertained on the ottoman for short periods; however as the ottoman does not have a seat belt and is not designed to be a buddy seat, such visits should be brief.

The design of the seats also means that it is impossible to see what your neighbour is doing – but makes it comparatively easier to see part of the person seated opposite you. Parents may therefore want to seat young children directly across the aisle from them. Again, this is a “best compromise”.


4.6 What are the notable features of the Olympus JCL seats?
There has been considerable criticism on these forums about the Olympus Business Class seats. These generally fall into two categories:

(i) Complaints about the herringbone configuration; and
(ii) Complaints about the Cathay version of the herringbone.

(i) Complaints about the herringbone configuration
These consist of complaints about the configuration itself, rather than the particular version which Cathay is rolling out.

Although this configuration, first pioneered by Virgin Atlantic, allows airlines to offer flat beds in Business Class without removing as many seats as it would have to were it to adopt a First Class-style layout, there are disadvantages compared to a traditional forward-facing layout:
  • Inability to look out the window
  • Inability to be seated next to and “travel with” a companion

The layout is however ideal for those passengers travelling alone, who wish to have privacy and who sleep better on a fully flat bed as opposed to a seat that reclines at an angle.

Airlines other than Cathay Pacific which offer the herringbone configuration include: Air Canada, Jet Airways, Delta, Air New Zealand and Virgin Atlantic. Note that unlike the latter two airlines, the Olympus seat does not require the passenger to get up and “flip” the seat over to turn it into a bed.

(ii) Complaints about the Cathay version of the herringbone
The main complaint here is that the seats are too narrow, and that in an effort to keep the number of Olympus seats similar to the number of NBC seats, the design results in there being very little shoulder room and overall makes for a very cramped, unenjoyable flight.

Flyers have noted that the width of the Cathay seat appears to be narrower than that of Air New Zealand or Virgin Atlantic. This feeling of lack of shoulder room may be exacerbated by the height of the dividers. This latter problem has been partially alleviated by Cathay through a design change, which has seen the height of the dividers lowered to allow more lateral room at the shoulder/headspace level. Criticisms that the fabric of the seat has 'stuck' to clothing has also seen Cathay introduce a new upholstery, which is progressively being introduced across the Olympus-fitted fleet.

For further information on the pros and cons of the Olympus seat, please view this thread.

All of the major criticisms of the Olympus herringbone seat have been addressed by the Cirrus refresh (although as will be evident from a search of this forum, has given rise to a new breed of complaints by those who preferred the Olympus iteration, and thus proving the old adage that it is impossible to please everyone all of the time).


4.7 What amenities are provided in Business Class?
In long-haul Business Class, passengers are provided with an amenity kit which also includes socks, toothbrush/toothpaste, earplugs and eyeshades. No pyjamas are provided, although you are of course more than welcome to bring aboard your own sleepwear to change into. Business Class passengers travelling long haul (routes, not aircraft) will receive a light duvet; regional Business Class passengers a fleece blanket.

Water bottles are automatically provided after the first meal service for passengers on long-haul Business Class services. They are available on request on short-haul flights; however as individual-sized bottles are not catered on short-haul sectors, please be considerate towards the cabin crew’s service requirements when requesting individual bottles of water.


4.8 How are mains served in Business Class?
Mains continue to be delivered through pre-plated casserole dishes across all flights in the Cathay Pacific network. At the discretion of the Senior Purser on your flight, the mains may be served either via tray presentation (flight attendant presents tray with the options on it, which is continually refreshed by trips to the galley); or via trolley operating from one end of the cabin to the other.

This thread contains Business Class menu transcripts for recent flights.

Last edited by Top of climb; May 14, 13 at 4:02 am.
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Old Nov 28, 10, 3:43 pm   #7
 
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5. Premium Economy Class

5.1 Premium Economy: when, what, where?
Premium Economy will roll out to all long haul destinations by the end of 2013.


5.2 Which flights have Premium Economy?
Premium Economy is available on all Long Haul flights operated by the 33G, 74K, 77G or 77H. This leaves only the following destinations and their anticipated on stream date:
  • Paris (CX278/9 only - CX260/1 has PEY) - anticipated late September 2013
  • Amsterdam - mid-October 2013
  • Auckland - mid-October 2013
  • Rome (34B)

Premium Economy, may not, however, be offered on all flights to all a destination.



5.3 Is Premium Economy worth the upgrade from Economy or the downgrade from Business?
Here is a trip report written on the PEY experience. It confirms that it is very much an "economy plus" product and not a "business minus" one.

Premium Economy is a one tray meal service with Business Class mains for the first meal service and a hybrid of mains for the second meal service.

Last edited by Top of climb; May 13, 13 at 5:40 am.
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Old Nov 28, 10, 3:44 pm   #8
 
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6. Economy Class

The exact Economy Class product will depend on the type and configuration of aircraft. Generally there are three main types of product: New Cradle, Olympus Hard Shell and Regional (although in the case of Regional there are some product variations).

New Cradle seat
Installed on: 33G, 77G, 77H

Olympus Hard Shell seat
Installed on: 33B, 34B, 77D, 77Z, 74A, 74K

Regional seat
Installed on: 330, 772, 773


6.1 What is the seat pitch in CX Economy Class?
A standard 32" across the entire fleet.

6.2 Do Economy Class seats differ according to aircraft?
Yes. Even ignoring the Long Haul retrofit, Cathay have a number of different Economy Class seats depending on which type of aircraft you are flying on. To further complicate matters, the seats may be different within each aircraft type as well (and in the extreme case of the 773 B-HNN, different within the same aircraft!) However all Economy Class seats, no matter which variant, are fitted with seatback PTV.

These are the different variants we have identified on non-Olympus aircraft (please refer to the table in section 1 above to determine what type of Economy Class seat your aircraft will carry):

Standard Y seat features:
  • Standard-sized 6.4" seatback PTV with fixed control panel on armrest
  • Non-adjustable headrest
  • Non-slimline design

Slimline Y seat features:
  • Standard-sized 6.4" seatback PTV with fixed control panel on armrest
  • Adjustable 'winged' headrest
  • Slimline design


6.3 What are the notable features about the Olympus YCL seat?
The main feature of the new Olympus YCL product is the hard shell surround around each seat, similar to a mini-Business Class seat. The intention of the hard shell surround is that the seat now reclines within the shell and not on to the lap of the person behind you, thus creating a fixed living space for each passenger. The risk of having someone recline on you while you are eating your meal is eliminated with the Olympus design. Additionally, the slimline design of the shell and the seat means that while the seats remain the same distance apart as on non-Olympus aircraft, your legroom is effectively increased.

The drawback is that the recline becomes less comfortable, because the seat is essentially sliding inside its own shell. The main criticism is of the padded headrest, which remains perpendicular to the base of the seat. This creates a rather uncomfortable position for the neck and head when the seat pan is tilted upwards in reclined position.

All Olympus YCL seats feature a widescreen PTV located on the back of the seat in front, and is AVOD-enabled. The removable remote control is located under the PTV on the back of the seat in front.

When all retrofitting is complete, the Olympus YCL seat will feature long haul on the A340 and B747 fleet. It will also replace the gradually aging (and shabby) seats installed on Cathay's Regional fleet; the thinking being that the loss of recline on regional flights will cause less of an impact than on long haul flights.


5.4 Where are the dreaded underseat IFE boxes located and do they significantly restrict legroom?
IFE boxes are all located specific seats, so if you are unlucky enough to be assigned to that seat letter, you may find your legroom to be considerably less than your neighbour's.

On 744 aircraft, the seats are located under the middle window seats (B and J), and possibly under the two middle seats in the middle section (E and F), although the latter is to be confirmed.

It has been confirmed that on 333 aircraft B-HLW, the IFE boxes are located under seats A, D, G, K. (We think this is the same for the other Airbus aircraft).


6.5 How do I get an emergency exit row seat?
Most emergency exit row seats are now marked as "Extra Legroom Seats", which can be secured free of charge by elite Marco Polo club members on a first come, first served basis. Other passengers may secure an Extra Legroom Seat by paying a prescribed fee at the time of booking.

Be warned that since the tray table and PTVs come out of the armrest in such seats, they are fixed into position (i.e. they cannot tip up unlike in other seats) and wider than in other seats, thereby making the seats a bit 'snug'. On the B747-400 series, the inflatable slide compartment in the door also eats up quite a bit of legroom in the A/K seats. Please consult the Cathay Pacific website for further information.

Current emergency exit seats found on the following aircrafts are:
A333 330, 33B, 33G - 54ACHK
A343 34B - 54ACHK
B747 74A - 44BCHJ; 74K - 48BCHJ
B773 773, 77Z - 44BCHJ
B77W 77D - 31ABCHJK and 54BCHJ; 77G - 43ABCHJK and 59ABCHJKJ, 77H - 59ABCHJK
B772 777 - 54BCHJ

Certain bulkhead seats are also marked as Extra Legroom Seats. Please consult Cathay Pacific's seat maps for further information. Extra Legroom Seats are marked with a + sign on Cathay's seat maps.


6.6 Do Economy Class seats have in-seat power and data ports?
The Olympus product was designed to feature in-built power. The plug is located at the head of each armrest. However, a design flaw has led to power interruptions. While a temporary fix has been enabled for FCL and JCL, Olympus YCL cabins currently remain without plug-in power. We understand Cathay’s systems engineers are working to remedy this problem.

Last edited by Top of climb; Jan 13, 13 at 10:24 am.
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Old Nov 28, 10, 3:45 pm   #9
 
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7. StudioCX

7.1 What is StudioCX?
StudioCX is just Cathay Pacific's brand name for its inflight entertainment system. Contrary to some beliefs, it is not Cathay's AVOD system.

It can be somewhat of a misnomer since all Cathay Pacific flights have PTVs, and ergo, StudioCX.


7.2 What's Cathay's inflight entertainment system like on long haul aircraft?
All passengers on flights operated by Long Haul Product aircraft can enjoy Audio Video on Demand (AVOD) aboard all long haul flights.

Noise cancelling headphones are provided in First, Business and Premium Economy Class.


7.3 What is Cathay's inflight entertainment system like in non-AVOD Economy Class/regional Business Class?
This FAQ applies to passengers on 330, 777 and 773 aircraft.

All Cathay Pacific aircraft have personal television screens (PTVs) fitted in all seats in all classes. There is a choice of approximately 20 video channels, featuring movies, comedy, documentary, kids and Asian movies. They operate on a cycle-system – not on demand.

In Economy class the PTV is on the back of the seat in front (or in the armrest if there is no seat in front). On all regional and most long-haul aircraft, the control headset is mounted on the armrest and is non-movable.

Although a regional product, the entertainment system fitted on regional Business Class is reasonably poor. A first-generation size PTV swings out from the centre armrest, offering the same channel loop/cycle system as in Economy class. Noise-cancelling headphones are not provided. The PTV size and quality is slightly better on RRBC aircraft, but frankly, not by much. If inflight entertainment is important to you, we suggest trying to book on a regional flight operated by a long-haul aircraft wherever possible.

However, good news for Regional flyers! AVOD will be installed on Regional aircraft together with the retrofit of NRBC. So if you are on a NRBC-equipped aircraft, you will also have AVOD.

Last edited by Top of climb; Jan 13, 13 at 10:15 am.
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Old Nov 28, 10, 3:46 pm   #10
 
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8. Upgrades

8.1 What are my chances at an operational upgrade (op-up)?
The general principle applied by Cathay is that passengers should be seated in the class in which they are ticketed. Upgrades should only be actioned where there is a commercial need to do so. In terms of operational upgrades, this means that these will only occur where there is overbooking in lower classes.

We understand that the ranking system which applies in determining who receives priority for an operational upgrade is as follows (with thanks to kchika):
  1. VIP (Heads of State, Government Bodies, or Canto Pop/Movie stars)
  2. CX Diamond Plus
  3. CX Diamond Invitation, Diamond
  4. CX Gold
  5. CX management staff on travel duty
  6. oneworld Emerald
  7. CX staff on duty nominees , other airline staff nominees, CX staff on personal travel
  8. oneworld Sapphire
  9. CX Silver
  10. oneworld Ruby
  11. CX Green
  12. Asia Miles
  13. Non status
In the event of a tiebreak being needed, the computer will generally parse by boarding sequence number (lower BN takes priority). Needless to say, the earlier you check in, the lower your BN.

Asking for an upgrade at check-in will not work, so don't. This is definitely one case of where "if you don't ask, you don't get", does NOT apply.


8.2 OK, so I think by virtue of my oneworld or MPO status I have a decent shot at an upgrade. Does fare class play a role as well?
Unfortunately we don't seem to have a definitive answer on this. Some propound that the most heavily discounted fares are not upgradable (by miles or otherwise). Others have said, and have had experience in getting op-ups even on an award ticket, that fare codes play no basis in getting op-ups.

The short and the long of it is that while being booked in a heavily discounted fare class may mean you miss out on an op-up, there is no definitive evidence that this is a hard and fast rule, especially given reports to the contrary.


8.3 How are upgrades processed?
Upgrades are generally processed within 24 hours of departure when CX's computer does a final sweep of the flight and determines the overall load factor. It will then do a search for all relevant MPC members and other qualified oneworld members for eligibility if it necessitates upgrade procedures. Note that operational upgrades will only apply if the flight is overbooked.

To have the best shot at operational upgrades, flights should be booked under CX flight numbers. Codeshared flights (e.g. under AA flight numbers) are not included in the op-up procedural 'sweep' as CX will not have control of the codeshare airline's inventory until much closer to departure.


8.4 When do I find out if I have scored an op-up?
At any point between online check-in when it opens 48 hours before departure (albeit rare) to actual physical check-in at the airport, to "please contact Reception" announcements in the CX lounge and even when the boarding pass reader beeps and rejects your boarding pass right at the gate! The latter is getting more and more common, so don't give up hope until you're on the plane and it's taken off.

Last edited by Top of climb; Feb 16, 12 at 3:55 am.
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Old Nov 28, 10, 3:47 pm   #11
 
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9. HKIA transit and lounges

QuickGlance at this section's questions
9.1 What lounges do Cathay Pacific operate at HKIA?
9.2 Should I use The Wing, The Pier, The Cabin or G16 Lounge?
9.3 Where do I transit?
9.4 Do I have access to the First Class lounge in HKG if connecting CX/KA First to CX/KA Business?
9.5 Can I use a CX lounge if I am not flying CX?
9.6 Am I entitled to use The Arrival?



9.1 What lounges do Cathay Pacific operate at HKIA (aka “what are my choices”?)
Cathay Pacific operate five lounges at HKIA: four departure lounges (The Wing, The Pier, The Cabin and the G16 Lounge), and one arrivals lounge (The Arrival). It is on track to open by Q3 2013 a sixth lounge, The Bridge, by gate 40. All four departure lounges are airside and are consequently only accessible by passengers who have an onward boarding pass and who have cleared security and passport control.


9.2 Which departures lounge should I used?
Following renovations that took place throughout 2012, The Wing has now re-opened in its entirety to First and Business Class passengers.

Generally use the lounge closest to your departure gate. However, you are free to choose whichever lounge you wish. Just remember to leave plenty of time to get to your gate if you choose a lounge further away.

Food
  • Food is generally the same between The Wing and The Pier, regardless of class of travel (i.e. both The Wing and The Pier have The Haven restaurant for First Class and the Noodle Bar for Business Class). The Wing has the new Coffee Loft concept offering freshly brewed coffee and freshly baked pastries.
  • The Cabin has a different food concept (The Deli and the Health Bar offer made-to-order hot sandwiches and antipasti, and fresh juices).
  • G16 offers a Noodle Cart (similar to the Noodle Bar).
  • All lounges feature the usual snack/pickings self service buffet.

Showers and relaxation facilities
  • The Wing, The Pier and G16 all have shower facilities. The Cabin does not.
  • The Wing (First Class) offers cabanas with shower, bathtub and chaise lounge. The Pier (First Class) does not offer cabanas but does have Dayrooms, which is a small room with a sleep chair and entertainment unit.

Technology
  • All lounges offer free wifi and desktop computers.
  • The Cabin has iPads and Blackberry Playbooks for lounge use.

Space and style
  • The Wing (Level 7) has a good view over the southern runway and apron, and is the most airy and spacious due to its open-air design. The Wing (Level 6) has a view over a carpark.
  • The Cabin looks out over the southern runway and apron and will offer an excellent view of whatever is parked at gates 23 and 25. It has a more enclosed/seclusive feel due to its position on Level 5.
  • G16 offers a good view over the northern runway and apron. It has an open-air design similar to the Wing.
  • The Pier (Business Class) looks out towards the northern runway and will offer an excellent view of whatever is parked at gates 62 and 64. It has an enclosed/seclusive feel due to its position on Level 5. The Pier (First Class) has no external view.

Opening hours
  • The Wing and The Cabin open at 5.30 am and stay open until last flight departure.
  • The Pier opens at 6 am and closes at 11.30 pm.
  • No one cares when G16 opens or closes.


9.3 What is a transit point "E1", "E2" and "W1"? What is the difference between them? Where do I transit?
Passengers in transit at Hong Kong International Airport do not need to clear passport control and uplift their checked baggage (assuming that such baggage has been tagged through to their final destination). They will, however, be required to re-clear transit security.

Hong Kong has three major transit points: E1, E2 and W1 (the E and W stand for East and West) and three minor transit points (unnumbered). Locations of transfer points are as follows: E1 is located near gate 15; E2 near gate 21 and W1 near gate 60. The three minor transit points are located at gates 27, 44 and 64 but these checkpoints operate limited hours.

All transit points are fitted with a security checkpoint but only the major transit points have airline transfer counters.

Therefore, if you do not have your onward boarding pass you will need to obtain it from whichever major transit point has a airline transfer counter of your onward carrier. Cathay Pacific is represented at both transfer points E2 and W1. You can then clear security at that transit point, immediately after collecting your onward boarding pass.

If, however, you already have your onward boarding pass, you may clear at whatever transit point (either major or minor) is most convenient for you. Usually this will be at the transit point closest to the gate of your arriving flight. However, we add the following caveats for certain passengers, who may find it more convenient to clear security at a transit point other than that closest to their arrival gate.

Connecting passengers entitled to lounge access
Recent changes to the Automatic People Mover concourse shuttle train at HKIA mean that it is now monodirectional by level. That is, departing passengers can only take the train towards gates 33-71; and arriving passengers can only take the train towards gates 1-19. In short, if you take the train to the Pier, you cannot take the train back to the Wing and will have to walk.

It therefore pays for passengers in transit to consider which lounge they would like to use before they clear transit security. If your flight arrives at (say) gate 69 and you want to use The Wing, it is more sensible to take the arrivals APM and clear security at transit point E2, rather than to clear at the closest transit point to your arrival gate (W1) and then have to walk all the way back on the departures level back to The Wing. For that same reason, if your onward connection has not yet been assigned a departure gate, it is usually better to take the Arrivals APM, clear at E2 and go to the Wing pending a gate assignment, rather than risk clearing at W1, going to the Pier and then discovering that your next flight departs from (say) gate 4.

Passengers who see a long queue at their closest transfer point
Particularly during the peak morning arrival period (0630-0800), with a lot of Cathay flights arriving, queues may build up at certain transit points due to their central location. Transit point W1, located at the junction of gates 35, 40 and 60 (where the terminal splits into the "Y" shape) is a particular offender. If you are transiting and see a particularly nasty queue at W1, we strongly suggest you walk down the central concourse towards gates 33 and 34 (i.e. towards arrivals/passport control, but do NOT follow the signs for arrivals as this will lead you to the Automated People Mover station - simply keep walking down the main concourse in line with the gate numbers decreasing) and clear security at the checkpoint by gates 27-29 instead. This will save you a lot of time.


9.4 I am arriving off CX First Class and connecting to a CX or KA flight in Business Class. Can I access the First Class lounge during my transit?
Yes. You will be issued with two lounge invitations when you check in for your flight, one for use at your outport and one for use in Hong Kong. Your Hong Kong lounge invitation will clearly display an invitation to "The Wing/Pier/Cabin/G16 Lounge - FIRST CLASS".


9.5 I am not a Marco Polo Club member. I am not travelling on a Cathay Pacific or Dragonair flight. Can I use the Wing, the Pier or the G16 lounge?
First and Business Class passengers travelling on oneworld operated flights are entitled to use any of the three departure lounges, irrespective of oneworld status.

oneworld sapphire and emerald members who are departing Hong Kong on a oneworld ticketed and operated flight are entitled to use any of the four Cathay Pacific/Dragonair lounges. They are not restricted to the lounge operated by their onward carrier.

Marco Polo Diamond members are entitled to use the Business Class lounge when not travelling on a Cathay Pacific or Dragonair flight.

If you do not fall into any of these categories you are out of luck.


9.6 Am I entitled to use The Arrival?
The Arrival is located in the passageway between Terminals 1 and 2 (landside). Cathay was only able to secure a small space from the airport authority for construction. Accordingly, the lounge is limited entry.

Passengers entitled to use The Arrival are First Class, Business Class, Gold tier and above Marco Polo Club members and oneworld emerald passengers arriving off a Cathay Pacific or Dragonair flight.

As the Arrival is landside it is available for Hong Kong-terminating passengers only (or passengers in same day transit exceeding four hours who have cleared passport control and customs). Eligible transit passengers are entitled to use any of the four departure lounges.

golfingboy has written a very comprehensive set of directions, complete with photos, to make it easy for people to find The Arrival (which is not well signposted).

The Arrival is open from 5 am and closes at midnight.

Last edited by Top of climb; May 13, 13 at 8:45 am.
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Old Nov 28, 10, 3:47 pm   #12
 
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10. Marco Polo Club and Asia Miles

The following classes are eligible for mileage accrual (thanks to pacificboot):

All First Class fares (A, F)
earn 150% Club Miles/Sectors and Asia Miles.

All Business Class fares (I, D, C, J) earn 125% Club Miles/Sectors and Asia Miles, and are mileage upgradeable.

Premium Economy Class fares W, R and E earn 110% Club Miles/Sectors and Asia Miles, and are mileage upgradeable.

Economy Class fares M, K, H, B and Y earn 100% Club Miles/Sectors and Asia Miles, and are mileage upgradeable.

Economy Class fares V, L and M earn 100% Club Miles/Sectors and Asia Miles, but are not mileage upgradeable.

The following classes are not eligible for mileage accrual:
First Class award code Z, Business Class award code U, Premium Economy award code tbd and Economy Class award code T.
Economy Class fare codes G, Q, N, O & S do not earn miles and are not mileage upgradeable. *Note however that N, O, Q & S fares on Cathay do earn mileage at 50% when credited to Finnair's MileagePlus programme.Or 25% when credited to BA's Executive Club.

For mileage earning opportunities on other partner airlines with Asiamiles and MPC, please see the Cathay Pacific website.


10.1 What is the difference between the Marco Polo Club and Asia Miles?
Unlike most airlines, which have tier miles and redemption miles under the same banner, Cathay Pacific has parsed them off into two separate programmes: the Marco Polo Club and Asia Miles respectively. This can be traced back to the days when Cathay only operated an elite loyalty programme (the Marco Polo Club) and not a redemption “earn and burn” programme (now Asia Miles). Note that the joining fee for the Marco Polo Club is US$50. Though if you have a good travel agent with a good working relationship with Cathay Pacific, he/she may be able to get the fee waived.

Mileage accrual rules are the same for both programmes. This means that if your fare is mileage accruing, you will earn both Club Miles (for tier qualification) and Asia Miles (for mileage redemption).


10.2 What is the difference between Club Miles and Club Sectors?
Eligible earning fares will earn both Club Miles and Club Sectors. As its name suggests, Club Miles is the number of miles flown on the particular flight (plus a 125% or 150% surcharge if travel was in Business or First Class respectively). Again, as its name suggests, Club Sectors are earned per sector flown on an eligible Cathay Pacific or oneworld flight. Passengers earn 1 Club Sector for every Economy Class sector, 1.25 for every Business Class sector and 1.5 for every First Class sector flown.

Tier qualification may be achieved by either Club Miles or Club Sectors but not both.


10.3 I do not have elite Marco Polo status but I will be flying over 120,000 miles in the next year. Does this mean I can leapfrog straight from no status to Diamond status?
No. The Marco Polo Club applies a stepped tier programme starting from Silver tier. This means that once you exceed the 30,000 miles (or 20 Club Sector) threshold, you are automatically granted Silver tier membership. At this time your mileage balance is reset to zero to reflect the fact that you are commencing a new membership year at Silver tier.

You then have another 12 months from the date of earning Silver tier to fly a further 60,000 miles to earn Gold, at which time you will again be reset to zero and your membership year reset to allow a further 12 months in which to earn Diamond tier. Effectively this means that you need to fly 30,000 + 60,000 +120,000 = 210,000 miles to jump straight from no status to Diamond tier (or the equivalent in Club sectors).
Note that your membership year runs from the day you attain a new tier until the end of that month plus 12 months. For example, if you earn Silver tier on 6 April 2009, your membership year will run from 6 April 2009 through to 30 April 2010.

Should you fail to advance to a higher tier, your membership year will be reset on the last day of the month in which you earned your current tier. Thus in the example above, if in the following membership year you earn 45,000 miles, you will be reset to zero at silver on 30 April 2011.


10.4 Huh? I still don't understand how qualification works.
cxfan1960 has kindly provided the following "flowchart for dummies":

(1) Join MPC - Start membership year -> go to (2)

(2) Green
* Minimum 30,000 Club Miles or 20 Club Sectors within membership year - qualify for Silver. Reset membership year -> go to (3), else;
* Renew Green at end of membership year for another membership year.

(3) Silver (oneworld Ruby)
* Minimum 60,000 Club Miles or 40 Club Sectors within membership year - qualify for gold. Reset membership year -> go to (4), else;
* Between 30,000 and 60,000 Club Miles or between 20 and 40 Club Sectors within membership year - renew Silver at end of membership year for another membership year, else;
* Back to Green at end of membership year for another membership year -> go to (2).

(4) Gold (oneworld Sapphire)
* Minimum 120,000 Club Miles or 80 Club Sectors within membership year - qualify for Diamond. Reset membership year -> go to (5), else;
* Between 60,000 and 120,000 Club Miles, or between 40 and 80 Club Sectors within membership year - renew Gold at end of membership year for another membership year, else;
* Between 30,000 and 60,000 Club Miles, or between 20 and 40 Club Sectors within membership year - back to Silver at end of membership year for another membership year -> go to (3), else;
* Less than 30,000 Club Miles, or less than 20 Club Sectors within membership year - back to Green at end of membership year for another membership year (subject to soft landing - see s 9.5) -> go to (2).

(5) Diamond (oneworld Emerald)
* Minimum 120,000 Club Miles or 80 Club Sectors within membership year - renew Diamond at end of membership year for another membership year;
* Between 60,000 and 120,000 Club Miles, or between 40 and 80 Club Sectors within membership year - back to Gold at end of membership year for another membership year -> go to (4),
* Between 30,000 and 60,000 Club Miles, or between 20 and 40 Club Sectors within membership year - back to Silver at end of membership year for another membership year (subject to soft landing - see s 9.5) -> go to (3), else;
* Less than 30,000 Club Miles, or less than 20 Club Sectors within membership year - back to Green at end of membership year for another membership year (subject to soft landing - see s 9.5) -> go to (2).


10.5 I am not going to earn enough miles to requalify at my current tier. Does Cathay do soft landings or will I be sent straight to the tier at which I have enough miles to qualify for?
Soft landings describe the process by which members are bumped down one tier at a time, even if they have not earned the necessary miles or sectors to qualify for that tier. As an example, a Diamond member who had only earned 34,000 miles in the current membership year would be soft-landed if she were bumped down to Gold tier (as opposed to the Silver tier which she has only earned enough miles for).

We have been unable to confirm a clear policy of whether soft landings are in place. We know of Diamond members who have been soft-landed to Gold. However, we also know of Diamond members who have been packing back to Green without being soft-landed through to even Gold if the qualifying flights/sectors are not met for requalifying. It may be that soft-landing is at the discretion of the Loyalty Manager who takes into account your current tier, the number of miles earned, your earning history etc.


10.7 I am going to be just shy of requalifying at a certain tier. Will Cathay let me have that tier anyway?
Anecdotal evidence suggests that if you are a couple of thousand miles short of attaining a particular tier before your membership year expires, you will be qualified at that tier on expiry date. The exact amount of miles you are short may be more flexible if you are shy of requalifying at your current tier, rather than shy of qualifying for the next tier up.

Alternatively, writing in to the Club to explain your circumstances may result in them extending your deadline for qualification.


10.8 Are there any unpublished benefits to being an elite Marco Polo Club member?
Marco Polo club members usually enjoy a personal welcome from the Inflight Service Manager on board their flight, although with the increasing number of members following the folding of Dragonair’s loyalty programme into the Marco Polo Club, members have reported that this does not always take place. Depending on the crew, members may enjoy priority meal choice or smuggled extras from higher cabins. We repeat that this is entirely at the discretion of the crew and is not a “right”. Obviously, the higher your tier status, the more informal recognition you can expect from Cathay staff.

Diamond card members are also given a buggy voucher to use at Hong Kong International Airport when their departing flight is parked at a gate higher than 40.


10.9 What is Green tier?
Green tier is the pre-qualification non-elite tier. It allows people to get a foot in the door, so to speak. It carries virtually no benefits of any use, except for access to the Marco Polo homepage on the Cathay Pacific website and priority check-in at designated Club counters (but not Business Class counters) where available.


10.10 What is Diamond Plus tier?
This is extended by Cathay Pacific to the top 1% of Diamond card holders based on revenue. Diamond Plus holders receive no official benefits to Diamond tier, but have a higher upgrade priority and can generally be expected to receive a warmer welcome by Cathay staff in recognition of their plus status. Though not officially publicised, we have heard that DMP members also get:
* Spousal DM
* Access to F lounges even when departing on non-OW flights.


10.11 What is Invitation tier?
This tier includes two groups of people. The first are those who prior to the revamp of the Marco Polo Club in the late 1990s had Lifetime tier, earned by flying a certain number of miles within a certain time period. Such members were transferred to the Invitation tier but essentially enjoy lifetime membership.

The second group are those which Cathay have targeted as desirable passengers. This group usually includes celebrities or those which they feel would be useful contacts. Invitation membership may be revoked from this group at the discretion of the Loyalty Manager.

10.12 Does the MPC ever status match ?
MPC generally does not status match to another carrier's elite FFP just because you want one. However recent reports seem to indicate that they are getting quite liberal in doing this but one may only be matched to MPC Silver. There has been very rare cases when one is matched right up to MPC Diamond, the highest level.

For more information , please read this thread: http://www.flyertalk.com/forum/catha...t=status+match

Last edited by sxc; Oct 29, 13 at 2:54 am.
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Old Nov 28, 10, 3:49 pm   #13
 
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11. cathaypacific.com

11.1 How do I view my CX itinerary online?
Go to the "Manage My Bookings" tab on the Cathay Pacific home page and enter your Asia Miles/Marco Polo Club membership number; or your booking reference if you are not a member.

The best way to change a booking or make seat selections is to call your local Cathay Pacific office, or if you are a Marco Polo club member to ring the toll-free international hotline. Generally ringing outside of Hong Kong business hours will minimise the waiting time.

Please note that advance seat reservation only opens 180 days out from the date of the flight.

11.2 How do I view CX award seat availability online?
You may view CX award seat availability by going to : https://www.cathaypacific.com/cpa/en_HK/RedemptionLogin

Make sure you have your Asia Miles / MPC number ready.


11.3 Who can check-in online?
You can check-in online if you are a Marco Polo club or Asia Miles member; or are travelling on an e-ticket. Online check-in opens 48 hours prior to scheduled flight departure. At this time you are able to select your seat on an interactive seat map; or if you have already selected a seat to confirm your chosen seat or to move to a free seat in the cabin.


11.4 Can I print my own boarding pass?
Self Print Boarding Pass is currently accepted at 13 outports plus Hong Kong. You will be advised during the course of online check-in whether your outport accepts Self Print Boarding Pass. Self printed boarding passes do not need to be validated at the airport and are accepted for direct entry into the secured zone and for boarding.

Please note that just because you use online check-in does not mean you need to utilise Self Print Boarding Pass. If you do not have a printer at the computer terminal where you are online checking in, or simply can't be bothered printing your own boarding pass, you can pick up a traditional boarding pass at the traditional check-in counter up to 45 minutes prior to flight departure.


11.5 Can I use mobile boarding pass?
Mobile boarding pass is currently available for one sector passengers departing certain ports only.

Last edited by Top of climb; Jan 12, 13 at 12:03 pm.
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Old Nov 28, 10, 3:49 pm   #14
 
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12. Dragonair

12.1 What is Dragonair, and how is it different from Cathay Pacific?
Dragonair is a full service, 100%-owned subsidiary of Cathay Pacific and an affiliate member of oneworld. Prior to Cathay assuming 100% ownership in 2007, Dragonair was a separate airline (in which Cathay had an approximately 19% stake) and was somewhat of a competitor on certain Asian routes. While in many respects, Dragonair's entry into the Cathay Pacific group has produced some synergies between the airlines at booking, loyalty club membership and lounge access, Dragonair holds a separate Air Operator's License to Cathay and is operated as a separate airline with its own crew and brand identity. Check-in for Dragonair flights is separate from check-in for Cathay Pacific flights at Hong Kong International Airport - passengers on Dragonair-operated flights should check in at aisle H.


12.2 What sort of aircraft do Dragonair fly?
Dragonair operate a mix of Airbus 320, 321 and 330-300 aircraft. There is a single two-class Business-Economy configuration of each of the A320 and A321 aircraft.

There are five different types of A330-300 aircraft, of which Dragonair have a total of 14 airframes. Five aircraft operate in a three-class First-Business-Economy configuration ("33R", "33Q"). Three aircraft operate in a regional two-class Business-Economy configuration ("33A"). Two aircraft operate in a regional two-class "ex-CX" Business-Economy configuration ("33C"). Three aircraft operate in a 'long-haul' two-class Business-Economy configuration ("33L"). We explain the seats available on these different aircraft below.

320 aircraft bear registrations B-HSD through HSQ.
321 aircraft bear registrations B-HTD through B-HTK.
33R aircraft bear registrations B-HYA, D, F, J and Q ("type 1" on the KA online seat map).
33Q aircraft bear registrations B-HYG, H and I ("type 1" on the KA online seat map). There is no difference between the 33R and 33Q configurations save for very minor discrepancies between bassinet positions and the position of the toilets.
33A aircraft bear registrations B-HWF, G and K ("type 2" on the KA online seat map).
33C aircraft bear registrations B-HLB, D and E. These are ex-CX birds which were transferred to KA.
33L aircraft bear registraionts B-HWH, I and J ("type 3" on the KA online seat map).

For those familiar with the Cathay A330 Zone A toilet layout, note that Dragonair's differs in that the port toilet in Zone A is located in front of the first row of portside seats and not behind the cockpit.


12.3 What lounges do Dragonair use in Hong Kong and elsewhere?
Prior to being amalgamated into the CX Group, Dragonair operated its own lounge opposite Gate 16. That lounge is still there, although it has been given a minor facelift to bring it in line with the general decorative scheme of CX lounges worldwide, and has been rebranded as the "G16 lounge". Lounge-eligible passengers may use any of the four Cathay Pacific lounges: the Wing, the Pier, the Cabin or the G16 lounge. Although not branded as such, the G16 and the Cabin lounges are generally regarded as Business Class equivalent lounges and Dragonair passengers with First Class lounge access are advised to use the First Class sections of the Wing or the Pier.

As an affiliate member of oneworld, Dragonair extends lounge benefits to oneworld elite members in line with the general oneworld/Cathay Pacific policy, which is outlined in the Lounges section below.


12.4 What is Dragonair First Class like? Is it worth it over Business Class?
(1) 33R/33Q
The seat
The ten A330-300 three-class aircraft feature two rows of First Class in a 2-2-2 configuration. The type of seat is similar to the lie-flat seats used by many airlines prior to the introduction of full-flat sleepers. They are similar to CX's previous-generation "New Business Class" or SQ's Spacebed. The best description of the seats can be found on the Dragonair website.

Inflight entertainment
Each seat is fitted with a 10.4" PTV, but has an extremely poor (by today's standards) selection of programming. There are only five channels, and there is no AVOD. Generally, one channel will show a current blockbuster movie (the same as on the main screens in Business and Economy class), one channel will show an Asia movie (Indian movie on flights to and from Bengaluru), and the remaining three channels will show a pre-programmed loop of short features. Headphones provided are similar to those in Cathay Pacific regional Business Class, i.e. non-noise cancelling. A three-prong jack is used.

Meals
Dragonair First Class usually offers a choice between a 'western meal' and a 'Chinese meal'. Although the menu delineates the two options, crew are generally happy for you to mix and match, e.g. if you wish to have a Western appetiser but a Chinese main course. Basically, the menu provides for a choice of a Western or Chinese appetiser, a Western or two Chinese main courses and a Chinese dessert or Haagen-Dazs ice cream. Dragonair typically partners with well-known restaurants in Hong Kong, Beijing and Shanghai to offer 'special' main courses.

As to whether the premium of First Class is worth it over Business Class, that is a question only you can answer. There is not a huge difference between catering and service in F, compared to J, anywhere like the difference that you would find on a long-haul CX service. The main advantages are having a lie-flat sleeper, and having access to F lounges in Hong Kong.


12.5 What is Dragonair Business Class like?
All of Dragonair's fleet is being retrofitted with the New Regional Business Class product that is also being fitted on Cathay Pacific aircraft. KA currently fly 6 aircraft with NRBC with retrofit proceeding at a clippy pace (in fact more clippy than the CX fleet!)

As for the non-retrofitted fleet, although it seems like that there are five different types of Business Class seat, there is really only one type of seat (that fitted on the 33L) which is dramatically different from those fitted on the rest of the KA fleet.

(1) 33R/33Q
The seat
The Business Class cabin on these aircraft is split across two cabins, forward and aft of doors 2. The seats are in a typical Airbus 2-2-2 configuration and are very similar to Cathay's regional Business Class product, i.e. a cradle recliner with 45" seat pitch. Please see the description on the Dragonair website.

Inflight entertainment
These seats do not have PTVs. There is main screen programming, and a choice of audio programmes. Headphones provided are similar to those in Cathay Pacific regional Business Class, i.e. non-noise cancelling. A three-prong jack is used. We suggest you bring along your own inflight entertainment and headphones.

(2) 33A
The seat
The Business Class cabin on these aircraft is basically an updated version of the cradle seats found on the 33R and 33Q. Please see the description on the Dragonair website.

Inflight entertainment
Each seat is fitted with a 10.4" PTV, but has a comparatively poor (by today's standards) selection of programming. There are ten channels, and there is no AVOD. Headphones provided are similar to those in Cathay Pacific regional Business Class, i.e. non-noise cancelling. A three-prong jack is used.

(3) 33L
The seat
These aircraft are fitted with lie-flat electronically-controlled sleeper seats similar to the pre-flat bed generation seats on other airlines. The seats have a 63" seat pitch and recline within a hard shell. Please see the description on the Dragonair website.

Inflight entertainment
Each seat is fitted with a 10.4" PTV, but has a comparatively poor (by today's standards) selection of programming. There are ten channels, and there is no AVOD. Headphones provided are similar to those in Cathay Pacific regional Business Class, i.e. non-noise cancelling. A three-prong jack is used.

(4) 321
The seat
These seats are typical regional cradle seats, with a 42" seat pitch. They are similar to a Oceanic/North American regional premium class product (and not like an European regional product) in that they are not convertible Economy seats but are arrayed in a permanent 2-2 configuration. Please see the description on the Dragonair website.

Inflight entertainment
There is overhead main screen programming and a choice of sixteen audio channels. Headphones provided are similar to those in Cathay Pacific regional Business Class, i.e. non-noise cancelling. A three-prong jack is used.

(5) 320
The seat
These seats are typical regional cradle seats, with a 42" seat pitch. They are similar to a Oceanic/North American regional premium class product (and not like an European regional product) in that they are not convertible Economy seats but are arrayed in a permanent 2-2 configuration. Please see the description on the Dragonair website.

Inflight entertainment
Dragonair's own website says that inflight entertainment on the A320 is "newspapers and magazines", which is entirely truthful. There are no audio or video programming facilities on board the A320. We strongly suggest that if you are in the market for inflight entertainment, you bring on board a good book, a laptop or an ipod, or an eyeshade and earplugs.


12.6 What is Dragonair Economy Class like?
Descriptions of seats on each aircraft type can be found on the Dragonair website. (For Economy Class products on aircraft other than the 33R/33Q to which the link redirects, please click on the relevant aircraft type on the left hand menu and then click 'Economy Class' on the box on the right hand side of the screen, that appears for each aircraft type). Basically, there are PTV's in Economy Class only on the 33A and the 33L, main screen video and audio programming on the 33R, the 33Q and the 321 and nothing at all on the 320.


12.7 Why do Dragonair and Cathay fly some of the same routes? Which airline should I choose?
Beijing, Shanghai, Taipei and Manila are served by both airlines. The reason why both airlines operate these sectors is largely a matter of history and market forces. Historically, the Hong Kong Airline Transport Licensing Authority granted route licenses under a system of "one route, one airline". When this was abolished, Cathay immediately applied to recommence services to Beijing, Shanghai and Xiamen; an application that was granted in 2003. Simultatenously, Dragonair applied to commence services to Bangkok, Seoul, Taipei, Tokyo and Sydney.

Upon Dragonair’s amalgamation into the CX Group, this route duplicity was reduced to some extent. Schedules between the two airlines were adjusted to allow for better hub synergies. CX took over two Dragonair frequencies to Shanghai, and withdrew from Xiamen. Dragonair withdrew from Bangkok and Tokyo, discontinued its plans to launch Seoul and Sydney, and added a narrowbody five-weekly flight to Manila to supplement a widebody two-weekly service operated by Cathay (CX912/3 + KA912/3).

As to which is preferable, that is largely a matter of determining what factors are most important to you as a traveller. Mileage-earning privileges on both airlines are effectively the same under Marco Polo/oneworld rules. Passengers on both airlines have access to the same lounge facilities in Hong Kong, Beijing, Shanghai, Taipei and Manila. If the seat is important to you, Cathay sometimes rotates long-haul aircraft on to its regional routes, and these will generally be of a superior quality to Dragonair's regional aircraft. On the other hand, Dragonair's 33L Business Class product is superior to Cathay's regional Business Class. Anecdotal evidence has been received that catering and Economy Class service is slightly better on Dragonair, but again, this is largely a matter of personal perception and preference. As a general rule, it is generally not worth deliberately choosing one airline over the other if by doing so you are required to take a flight that is at an inconvenient time for you.

However, if you are indifferent to the time of your flight, we suggest the following priority cascade for Business Class flights:

Beijing/Shanghai/Taipei
  1. CX 33G/77G/77H
  2. CX 34B/34J/74A/74K
  3. KA 33L
  4. CX 77Z, KA 32Z or KA 33Z (i.e. New Regional Business Class)
  5. KA 33C and CX 330/773/777
  6. KA 33A
  7. KA 33R and KA 321
  8. KA 320

Manila: CX > KA

Passengers in Economy Class who are indifferent to inflight entertainment, and who have checked baggage, may prefer KA narrowbody flights as the smaller capacity of the aircraft will result in speedier (on average) hold baggage delivery times.

Last edited by Top of climb; May 13, 13 at 8:48 am.
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Old Dec 8, 10, 6:52 pm   #15
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 943
13. Interline agreements with Other Airlines :

I'm connecting from CX / KA to xxxx airlines. Will they check my bag through?

CX/KA has interline agreements with the following airlines. This means that baggage may be checked through to final destination if travelling on same or seperate tickets. CX has no control , however at airports that do not allow overnight storage/connection of flights even if through check-in is availble. CX will advise you of this when checking in. Note that unless its on the same ticket, CX generally cannot issue you onward boarding passes. This is the same whether its a Oneworld alliance or not.


ELECTRONIC INTERLINE CARRIER AGREEMENTS-CX
INTERLINE CARRIER CODES :
MAY CHECK BAGGAGE TO

AA AB AC AE AF AH AI AM AS AT AV AY AZ BA
BD BG BI BL BP BR BT B6 B7 CA CI CM CO CZ
DL EI EK ET EY FI FJ FM GA GF GN HA HG HM
HR IB IC IG IR JC JJ JL JO JP JQ JU KA KC
KE KL KM KQ KU KW LA LG LH LO LP LR LX LY
MD ME MF MH MI MS MU MX NF NH NU NX NZ OA
OK OM OS OU OZ PG PK PR PS PX QF QR RA SA
SB SC SK SN SQ SU SV S7 TA TG TK TM TN TP
UA UL UN US UU VN VS VX WS WY W5 XL ZH 4M
9W

Please note that for the reserve , you need to check with THAT individual airline if they can thru check your bags to CX.

Last edited by Guy Betsy; Nov 21, 12 at 11:46 am.
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