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Old Jul 8, 08, 3:20 pm   #61
 
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Originally Posted by LeisureFirst View Post

I think this may have answered my question. You are saying that those born abroad are not US citizens until explicitly registered.
That's what he said but he is wrong. The registration is simply the recording of the birth. In essence, it is equivalent to a birth certificate. The certificate which is then issued after the "registration" is called something like "Notification of Birth Abroad of a Citizen of the United States."

The citizenship was obtained by birth, at birth, and the "registration" is simply the official recording of that birth. It does not make one a citizen.
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Old Jul 8, 08, 3:21 pm   #62
 
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I have two (Aust & UK), wife have one (US), so he gets three. Was quite an interesting logistical trip getting all the forms filled out after his birth. Mainly due to the annoyance that DK does not list place of birth on the birth certificate only the church parish, so needed the UK registration of birth first as that counts a birth certifcate for UK and USA. (the Aust and USA are more like a prize certifcate).

Incidentally, still lightly kicking myself that he could have had a fourth (Irish) as I am eligible but it cannot pass down to him if I apply after his birth. If this incorrect please send a PM...

Also would be quite silly of him if in years to come he renounces all three to get a DK passport...

Mark
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Old Jul 8, 08, 3:22 pm   #63
 
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Originally Posted by ANDREWCX View Post
And of course just to muddy things up certain areas outside the US are considered to be (or have been at various points) the US for citizenship purposes - the Canal Zone in Panama where John McCain was born is one that springs to mind.
John McCain is a citizen because of who his parents were, not because of where he was born. Panamanians who were born in the CZ were not citizens.
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Old Jul 8, 08, 3:32 pm   #64
 
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Originally Posted by Koru Flyer View Post
Also would be quite silly of him if in years to come he renounces all three to get a DK passport...Mark
On what grounds he would claim DK ? Denmark doesn't have jus soli concept for citizenship.
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Old Jul 8, 08, 3:32 pm   #65
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Then there is the issue of US nationals versus US citizens; people born in certain overseas territories are not citizens but nationals (i.e. they cannot vote, but I am sure the US government is happy to collect taxes), but they can become citizens rather easily (apparently).
I guess the District of Columbia is a U.S. territory where the residents are U.S. nationals and not full citizens because the have no effective federal representation and have to pay taxes to boot.

I'd imagine the nationals only have to move to the U.S.A. proper to get full citizenship rights.
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Old Jul 8, 08, 3:40 pm   #66
 
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Dual citizenship

I too have dual (UK/Swiss) citizenship. I tend to use my UK passport for the Western hemisphere + Japan, the Swiss for Eastern hemisphere and try and be consistent, so I don't end up confusing immigration officers. On top of that getting visas into my British passport can be tricky, when I'm resident in Switzerland and can't supply a resident's permit (which I don't need, as I'm a Swiss citizen.
One curiosity is the place of birth, which most countries have. Switzerland doesn't. It has a "place of origin", which basically is the place where your family comes from and generally doesn't change within a family. Can end up confusing immigration officers, but most of them don't spot the distinction. I've never dared entering the US with my Swiss passport, with my I94 giving a place of birth in the UK and my passport saying something totally different (though I guess relatively few Swiss are actually born in the place of origin).
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Old Jul 8, 08, 3:41 pm   #67
 
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Originally Posted by chgoeditor View Post
...but I'm wondering what kind of problems it would have caused yesterday if he'd dared to try to leave the UK (where he's a citizen) with French passport flying to the US (where he's a citizen). It might have thrown the BA agents off enough that they would have actually let him fly!
My cousin is born to a french mother and a British father in the UK so he is British and French. Whenever he travels he uses his french ID card or Passport and has even registered at IRIS with the French document. The UK does not really care what document you use but i could not understand for the life of me why somebody would want to live in the UK as a foreigner with limited rights when they could be exercising full rights as a British Citizen!!!

ive seen this scenario with a ton of people including Brit/Aussies, Brit/Americans and other Brit/EU citizens!

I guess its something for the kids to show off whenever they go on a school trip or something, im unique i got a different passport!
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Old Jul 8, 08, 3:47 pm   #68
 
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Originally Posted by catandmouse View Post
One curiosity is the place of birth, which most countries have. Switzerland doesn't. It has a "place of origin", which basically is the place where your family comes from and generally doesn't change within a family.
God, i just love Switzerland for things like this. Too bad they require ridiculously long settlement time for citizenship. Also, i wonder what does they wrote as a place of origin for naturalized citizens ?
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Old Jul 8, 08, 4:07 pm   #69
 
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Swiss citizenship

Actually the residency requirements to become Swiss aren't quite as bad as their reputation. It depends on where you come from, but I believe that for EU citizens and similar it's 5 years. For others, it's 10. Ideally you should remain in the same canton (Switzerland is horribly federalistic), otherwise the paperwork becomes horrendous.
As for the place of origin of new citizens, in my case I acquired my wife's. Others who don't have any connexions, usually acquire that of the place where they live. There are some communes who "sell" citizenship - notorious are some mountain communes with rapidly reducing populations.
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Old Jul 8, 08, 4:10 pm   #70
 
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Originally Posted by d3vski View Post
My cousin is born to a french mother and a British father in the UK so he is British and French. Whenever he travels he uses his french ID card or Passport and has even registered at IRIS with the French document. The UK does not really care what document you use but i could not understand for the life of me why somebody would want to live in the UK as a foreigner with limited rights when they could be exercising full rights as a British Citizen!!!
[Apologies - Drifting OT.]
If his parentage were the other way round (i.e. his father was French), he might be able to claim non-domiciled status for tax purposes. Much to the chagrin of many UK taxpayers, so-called non-doms have been able, in the right circumstances, to legally avoid paying UK tax on significant portions of their income. (As I understand it, this is in the process of being curtailed, but not so abruptly as to cause a mass exodus of the non-dom population.)

As for exercising rights as a citizen, apart from these being eroded faster than the arctic ice-sheet, surely the document you use to enter the country doesn't affect your entitlement in any way whatsoever?
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Old Jul 8, 08, 4:28 pm   #71
 
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Originally Posted by Xevus View Post
God, i just love Switzerland for things like this. Too bad they require ridiculously long settlement time for citizenship. Also, i wonder what does they wrote as a place of origin for naturalized citizens ?
you got to love the swiss for the following as well:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/programme...nt/1378320.stm

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/7427865.stm

can you imagine being able to vote and refuse citizenhip to the free loading benefit scrounging family down the road from you!

Gordon take a hint!!!
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Old Jul 8, 08, 5:35 pm   #72
 
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Originally Posted by thadocta View Post
Mine are somewhat different - my UK passport (issued in Canberra) lists my place of birth as PENRITH AUSTRALIA - my AU passport (issued in Sydney) lists my place of birth as PENRITH (nothing further added).

So it varies around the world.
thadocta, I think it also changes over time. As I said earlier, my old Australian passort said "City, USA" under place of birth. The renewal application I have now clearly indicates that it will only reflect "City" this time around.
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Originally Posted by ajax View Post
I quite like that the UK passport only lists the city, as anyone immediately looking at it wouldn't necessarily know I'm a US citizen as well (comes in very handy in certain parts of the world).

I agree with you that a US passport is a wonderful thing to have, all in all.
I second that ajax! I like my US passport and I also quite like having one that is completely non-US. Both are useful and have come in very handy.
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Old Jul 8, 08, 5:41 pm   #73
 
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oh, and another thing!
Let's talk about sexism here for a moment, shall we?

I believe, and I may be wrong, that if your FATHER is British, you can apply for 5 yr residency and eventual citizenship. But if you MOTHER is British, only 2 yrs residency for you and no citizenship.
(based on a number of Australians I have known - again, I could have misunderstood)
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Old Jul 8, 08, 6:43 pm   #74
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oh, and another thing!
Let's talk about sexism here for a moment, shall we?

I believe, and I may be wrong, that if your FATHER is British, you can apply for 5 yr residency and eventual citizenship. But if you MOTHER is British, only 2 yrs residency for you and no citizenship.
(based on a number of Australians I have known - again, I could have misunderstood)
Depends on when you were born. I think the magic date is sometime in early 1961 but something else changes in 1983 (less conditional, I think). I am pretty sure the citizenship is automatic, subject to provision of proof.
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Last edited by YVR Cockroach; Jul 8, 08 at 7:26 pm.
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Old Jul 8, 08, 6:49 pm   #75
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Well, no. Nor does the UK require "registration" as a citizen.
In a way, it does. Not everyone born in the U.K. is automatically a British citizen. There may be rather complicated rules even if neither parent is British or even if one parent is legally settled in the U.K. By contrast, just about anyone born in the U.S. unless the parents were posted in the U.S. on diplomatic/military grounds is a U.S. citizen, irregardless of the parent's status in the U.S.

http://www.bia.homeoffice.gov.uk/bri...yingterritory/
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