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Old Feb 1, 12, 4:15 am   #1
 
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lodges in Kenya Ol Donya Don't Use the Water

This is a very pretty lodge but the manager Abby is a bit cold and mechanical. It just seemed like she was going through the motions and was tired of saying the same thing. She had no warmth and I felt if you asked for anything she would give you an attitude which she did. She wasn't rude and didn't say anything wrong but it was uncomfortable if you did ask. Her fiance was much nicer. The minute you walk in the waiver is practically shoved in your face to sign and then she showed everyone the same room instead of individually which for $1,000 you should at least be shown your own room. I felt I was in class as she showed us all the switches and must of said 10 times not to use too much water since they have to truck in the water everyday. Why they built a lodge where there is no water is beyond me but I don't want to be told over and over to be careful with the water. When I went to take a shower they even had a sign in the actual shower not to use too much water, yet they have a plunge pool, outdoor shower, huge tub and inside shower. The other thing that really bothered me is that she said several times to not disturb them unless it is a medical emergency, if there are animals, bats whatever don't wake them up. Well, of course the first night there was a huge cricket in my bed and I was not going to get it out so I had to use the flashlight to get help which they said there was someone at all times if needed. There wasn't and I waived my flashlight but woke up the guy that worked with the horses in his towel but he was nice.

You can have the most beautiful lodge but if the management dosesn't make you feel like you are really welcomed, it doesn't matter. I stayed at Lolida House where the rooms are very plain but it was my favorite because the manager was so genuine and made every guest feel important and did whatever he could to make them happy.
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Old Feb 1, 12, 1:07 pm   #2
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I'm almost afraid to ask. Why couldn't you remove the cricket yourself?
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Old Feb 1, 12, 4:08 pm   #3
 
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You seem to have a track record of unhappy experience in Kenyan lodges ... from what you've posted on FT. If you decide to stay in a lodge in a country where water is a scarse commodity it's only responsible to conservie it.

If you want to indulge in water use, perhaps you should consider staying somewhere where water is more plentiful ... and that probably means in a city in Kenya.

To avoid disappointment in future, might I suggest you research the country and area you are visiting more thoroughly before you visit. You don't say where you come from, but most of the 'civilised world' can learn from other societies and cultures ... and accept that this means seeing things we're used to in a different light and being able to act accordingly.
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Old Feb 2, 12, 4:32 am   #4
 
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I stayed in 5 lodges and Hogmead in Nairobi which I loved. Yes, there was one horrible experience, Ol Donyo was not bad by any means, I just felt the management was a bit cold and was just going through the motions. Whenever I said that I stayed at Ol Donyo, the water issue came up so I am not the only one to mention this. I was told that a South African firm did the refurbishing and that it was always a bad idea to build a lodge where you have to truck in water everyday and why in the world would you place a plunge pool in each room, an outside shower, huge bathtub and rain shower if you are trying to conserve water. I did research on these lodges and I loved 4 out of 6. I am happy to learn of other cultures but I don't like being told constantly to not use the water, once is enough and was very careful during my stay not to use much.
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Old Feb 2, 12, 4:36 am   #5
 
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I am not sure if it was a cricket because it was so big, but it was my first night and by the end of the trip, I had squirrels running all over my room, bugs, lizards when I showered and actually got use to them but I admit I was a bit of a baby that first night. Oh well, live and learn.
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Old Feb 2, 12, 4:48 am   #6
 
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Out of the 6 places I stayed I would have to say I loved Loldia House, Naivasha. Colin was brand new on the job and couldn't have been nicer and the staff was just amazing. I had come from Borano so this experience was the complete opposite and am sorry I only stayed 2 nights. Hogmead in Nairobi was so beautiful. I couldn't get a reservation at Giraffe Manor but am glad I didn't. I stayed here off and on for 6 nights and Venetia and Jay did absolutely everything they could to make you feel welcome. The food was the best and I ate more in one day there than I do in a week at home.

All in all, I am glad I went to Kenya because it was so nice to see the children and it was a joy to see their faces when I gave them school supplies and books. I loved spending the day with them, it was the highlight of my trip as well as seeing the beautiful animals. It was unfortunate to have that one horrible experience.
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Old Feb 2, 12, 4:54 am   #7
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alsacienne View Post
To avoid disappointment in future, might I suggest you research the country and area you are visiting more thoroughly before you visit. You don't say where you come from, but most of the 'civilised world' can learn from other societies and cultures ... and accept that this means seeing things we're used to in a different light and being able to act accordingly.
This.
I had a great experience when I was in Kenya, but of course nothing that vaguely resembles the levels of comfort, lifestyle, etc. that we have in the so called first- (or civilized-) world.

One of the great things of visiting far places is getting in touch with different mindsets, people, and habits. Of course this often requires getting out of your comfort zone, and if you're not ready for that, maybe it's better if you carefully consider where you're about to go and change destination.

Getting to central Africa and expect water as if it's always raining is like going to Greenland in december in swimsuit and look for sandy beaches.
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Old Feb 2, 12, 5:05 am   #8
 
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It rained everyday in Narobi, 6 days in all, as well as Mara Plains which was practically flooded, Lewa Wilderness and Borano so there actually is water. I never intended to go to Kenya for swimming but there is also no need to beat you over the head, 20 times a day about not using any water. I got it the first time and it is obvious that conservation is a must.
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Old Feb 2, 12, 5:25 am   #9
 
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It rained everyday in Narobi, 6 days in all
Even in Nairobi there are 365 days in a year, and 366 in 2012.

Johan
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Old Feb 2, 12, 8:53 am   #10
 
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It rained everyday in Narobi, 6 days in all, as well as Mara Plains which was practically flooded, Lewa Wilderness and Borano so there actually is water.
Kenya has two rainy seasons, which normally occur naturally, and, yes there was exceptionally heavy rainfall in the Mara this December. BUT .... Kenya has made the headlines in the last few months because of drought - along with Ethiopia and Sudan.

Water is a precious resource in Kenya. The number of people who risk bilharzia and being eaten by crocs and hippos because they have no running water and use nearby lakes or rivers is higher than you might ever believe 4halex. I know this from personal experience. Just because it rains twice a year does not mean that there is enough for the rest of the year.

Again, from what you've posted, having spent so much on your trip, it seems that you are still far from aware of real life in Kenya. Sometimes however a point needs to be made more than once or even more than ten times because communication doesn't flow between the person giving it and the person receiving it ... which may have happened to guests who had stayed before you, hence the manager having to 'rub it in'.

We all have to be aware of different standards of living and natural resources when we travel - and hopefully that knowledge and our experiences make us better travellers.
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Old Feb 2, 12, 12:00 pm   #11
 
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Originally Posted by 4halex View Post
why in the world would you place a plunge pool in each room if you are trying to conserve water.
It has been proven (by SANParks, who quantified the effects) that the provision of pools reduces water consumption, as guests take fewer showers.

Johan
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Old Feb 2, 12, 7:04 pm   #12
 
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I am not going to go over this again and again, I never said that water was not something to be conserved and how important it is to many countries that do not have an adequate supply. I was overly careful about the amount I used! I am only saying that there is a way to get a point across without being rude or condescending. I also don't need a lecture on where I should travel, this was simply an observation of one place that I stayed at.
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Old Feb 5, 12, 3:10 pm   #13
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The problem is that many western visitors do need those constant reminders as they are not used to thinking of water as a scarce resource. So do you risk upsetting a few guests who listen and remember, and end up with tonnes of water wasted as a result, or do you constantly remind to drive it home to the thoughtless people that there is a big issue?

Yes, I'm sure you might have found it annoying. But you can blame the other tourists for refusing to listen as you did, not the lodge itself.

Glad you learned to cope with bugs though!
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Old Feb 6, 12, 12:30 am   #14
 
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Yes, you are most likely right. Actually, one of the guests said to the manager how great the shower was and spent an hour in it. Abby, the manager's face was not a happy one and I did hear her reprimand her. I'm sure she wasn't in there for an hour but as you say, there are those who don't seem to listen or care.
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